Airflo at the Glasgow Angling Open Weekend!

Glasgow Angling Centre Open Weekend

The Glasgow Angling Centre is host to yet another open weekend, just in time to celebrate the new fishing season. This year the brilliant 3 day event is being held over the 5-6-7th March – With some of the biggest names in the sport on hand to offer advice on all aspects of fishing, from the most effective fishing tackle to technique.

Open Weekend Opening Times

  • Friday 6th – Open 8am – 6pm
  • Saturday 7th – Open 8am – 6pm
  • Sunday 8th – Open 9am – 5.00pm

Colin Thomas and Kieron Jenkins will be on hand at the Airflo tackle selection at the GAC open weekend, they’ll ensure you’ll get the best service and knowledge of any Airflo product stocked at the Fishing Megastore.

What to expect over the 3 days

  • Loads of help and advice to help you become a better angler
  • Meet the biggest names in fishing, including: Stevie Munn, Paul Proctor, Billy Buckley, Mike Thrussell, Hywel Morgan, Paul Young and many more.
  • Huge discounts on all the biggest brands: Airflo, Hardy, Greys, Daiwa, Savage Gear, Simms, Patagonia and Shakespeare to name just a few.
  • Fly tying demos, fishing advice, presentations and loads more
  • Casting Competition with fantastic prizes on offer
  • Learn and improve your Lure fishing with our exclusive lure tank
  • Learn all about outboard engines, motors and related services, courtesy of Clyde Outboard Services
  • Free Parking
  • On-site Food & Refreshments
  • Snack/Sitting Area
  • Clean customer Toilets
  • Casting Pool to try before you buy on fly rods and to see demos of new and exciting rods for 2015

You won’t want to miss it!

The Open Weekend has such a unique atmosphere. People from far and wide flock to the 30,000 square foot fishing superstore to rub shoulders with the biggest names in fishing. However it also gives anglers the opportunity to share experiences, meet new faces and to express their passion for the great outdoors and love for the sport.

For more information on the Glasgow Angling Centre Open Weekend, click here: blog.fishingmegastore.com

Fishing the Bung with Super-Dri fly lines

The Bung is a very controversial method of fly fishing, but, who am I to judge what anglers use to catch fish? In my eyes it’s a method used to catch fish. It’s also a method I use on small-waters and occasionally the river when conditions dictate.

This method is basically a float which suspends a fly beneath, giving the angler immediate indication when a fish has then their fly. It’s a superb method on small-waters where fish are heavily pressured. Suspending a fly top, mid or bottom of the water column to intercept fish is an ingenious idea – especially when it’s fished properly – and accounts for many of the larger fish which are captured on small-waters.

A typical bung would be an indicator made out of foam, polystyrene or yarn, just like these fulling mill fish pimps. All these materials have great floating properties to suspend un-weighted or weighted flies. Another alternative would be Airflo Float-Do, a floating ‘dough’ like material which can be easily moved along the leader section to alter the depths.

How the Bung works

An idea of how the bung works

As you can see from the illustration above, there is a fairly steep angle between your fly line and fly, if a fish takes that fly, there is a lot of slack between the fly line, so a decent strike is needed to set the hook firmly. When using the bung you will see some anglers strike and not register a pull or feel the fish at all. This is due to the depth of the fly and the angle between the fly line.

One little tip I can give is use one of the new Airflo Super-Dri fly lines. The advantages of using one of these new floating lines from Airflo is the ability to lift so much more line off the water, this is due to the revolutionary Super-Dri coating. It repels water and sits extremely high on the surface, allowing less tension when lifting the line off the water than all other fly lines. This, in turn, allows for better hook up rates when compared to standard floating lines, from any manufacturer.

On my recent trip to Garnffrwd Trout Fishery it became apparent to me how good the Distance Pro from the Super-Dri family actually was. It’s a line I’ve been playing around with for a while, but it hasn’t really set itself apart from any other Super-Dri line I have used. Not until this trip anyway. For those of you who have been to Garnffrwd you may know of the ‘weed patch’ out on the far right of the lake – A submerged patch of weed, which sits just 3ft below the surface – just out of reach of most decent casters. This line has a 45ft head, and an extremely supple running line, which lets the line be cast an impressively long way.

Casting big distances with a bung is not only tough because of it’s mass, but it hinders hook up rates at distance because of the amount of line needed to lift from the surface to actually hook the fish. The Super-Dri coating eliminated this problem and hooking into fish at range becomes child’s play. The ability to throw such long distances and fish basically ‘un-fished’ water can change your day drastically, fishing over the top of this island I was lucky enough to hook and land a double figure rainbow trout on a bloodworm pattern! Check out the video footage below:

Fly Tying Tips – How to Strip Peacock Herl

A lot of fly tiers, especially novices, have trouble stripping peacock herl. Some describe it as an art, to get all the tiny herls free from the stalk, ready to tie your favourite buzzers and nymphs with very realistic bodies. 

As a tier I get asked ‘How to strip peacock herl?’ fairly often – there are many different ways fly tiers have come up with, from using the blades of scissors to an eraser. Personally I like the old fashion approach:

Need any fly tying materials? Find what you need in Fishtec’s range of fly tying kits, tools and accessories now.

Fly of the Week – Pink Glister Bug

Fly of the week - Pink Glister Bug

Everyone who’s ever caught grayling, know that they absolutely love pink. It’s one of those colours that really stand out when anglers talk about what fly they caught on, if it’s a hotspot, or a fully blow pink grub, pink is usually in there somewhere. This glister bug has proven it’s worth in any grayling fishers fly box, this fly pattern has counted for numerous amounts of fish for myself and others I fish with. I wouldn’t be without it.

I tie this fly with many colour tungsten beads but silver has to be my favourite. Take a bead and thread it onto a hook. Here’s I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph size 12. Runa layer of thread onto the shank of the hook, securing the bead in place and bulking up the thorax. Wind your thread onto the hook and cover the lead to ensure it’s securely in place. The pink UTC thread creates a great underbody for the dubbing. Tie in a strip of Large width pearl mylar for the shellback and a silver rib.

Take a decent pink of dubbing and dub into the thread to create an even ‘rope’, tapering slightly thicker towards the head. Wind the glister towards the eye – in touching turns – leaving enough room to tie in the rib and shellback. Pull the pearl over the back keeping it taught and secure in place with the silver wire rib. I’ve added a small piece of pink UV dubbing at the head of the fly to give it a small colour change. And that’s it! Simple, effective and efficient.

 

The Super-Dri Xceed performs at Rutland Water

As new stock of the Super-Dry fly line range finally rolls out of the warehouse and anglers are putting them to the test, it’s great to see that the technology behind these lines are performing as we expected and the Super-Dri family is gaining some respect among floating line fishermen.

Kieron Jenkins, our Online Marketing Manager spent two days fishing at Rutland Water testing our floating fly lines in search of some of Rutland’s specimen trout.

Reports have been saying Rutland Water has been fishing it’s socks off with plenty of good size fish being stocked, caught and returned back to the water – practically throughout the whole lake. Most fly fishermen would have seen by various sources that large brown trout caught from Rutlands north arm just a few weeks ago, if that alone wasn’t enough to tempt me im unsure what is!

I arrived at Rutland water around 9am Saturday morning to a gentle ripple and high, thick cloud. “Ideal conditions for surface feeding fish!” said one of the rangers. The temperature was fairly high after a few days of standard Autumn weather, so I chose to fish a team of dry flies from the off. From past experience it can take some time for fish to switch onto dries, especially now we enter the cooler months of the year.

My line of choice for this particular session was a WF7 Super-Dri Xceed, a fly line which has been developed to create high line speed, perfect for quickly covering rising fish or casting into a strong headwind, keeping your loops razor sharp and your flies turning over each cast.

Motoring from the jetty to the top of the north arm it was like driving into dry fly heaven. A gentle ripple and perfect light to spot your dry flies, the kind of thing anglers dreams are made of. This time of year you would be silly not to tie on a daddy long legs pattern, any sort of heat and a gentle wind will always get the daddies tumbling along the water surface.My cast consisted of two amber dry flies, one a sedge pattern and a bits pattern on the middle dropper, with a foam daddy on the point. For dries, tippet materal is always Airflo’s Ultra Strong Co-polymer, it sits low in the surface film but isn’t so heavy to drag the flies beneath the surface.

Due to the lake being low for bank-side maintenance, the top of the north arm is choked with weed – most, a foot or so below the surface. As we motored close to the bank in the shallow water the motion and sound of the boat spooked three or four fish sitting close to the surface, one, we actually watched swim along side of the boat as it tried to bolt away. A good sign for a dry fly fisherman!

Parking the boat on the edge of the weed beds with some visible weed below the boat I took the time to degrees my leader to ensure there was zero flash from the nylon. Second cast I spotted a fish push water, not even breaking the surface around 20 yards down wind, the perfect opportunity to test the casting ability of the Xceed. Stripping a few extra yards of line from my fishing reel, I cast the flies with perfect turn over at the fish now around 2 yards closer than previous. As the flies landed gently on the water, a head emerged and engulfed my middle dropper. With a standard floating line it’s a challenge to hook a fish at distance, the drag from the surface slows down your reaction time and can sometimes lead to missed fish, but the way the Super-Dri range seems to repel water, I could set the hook almost instantaneously to the strike.

The fish took off well in the shallow water, lunging for the submerged weed and getting the nylon caught in the string like matter. Some side-strain was all it took to drag it free from the weed and the fight continued. What I love about Rutland and especially the north arm, is that you never know what you’re going to hook into, it could be a run of the mill stocky, or a fully overwintered torpedo. I was fortunate enough to slip the net under this fish, a beautiful mended stocked fish of which I estimated just over three pounds in weight and in perfect condition for this time of year, a great start to the day and the ideal opportunity to test the Super-dri Xceed.

Kieron Rutland Rainbow

Kieron Rutland Rainbow

 

Fly of the Week – Sedge Hog

Fly of the week - sedgehog

The Sedge hog was devised as a pattern to convert sedge feeders into fish on the bank. This pattern can be fished dry, pulled just on or in the surface or below the surface to attract fish feeding on sedges and other large insects. Part wet fly, part muddler. A very buoyant fly, this pattern gives some great disturbance to attract fish to other flies on your cast. competition bots use these as point flies regularly when other foam or buoyant flies need to be removed.

Attach a strong, but lightweight hook into the vice and run a layer of thread down the hook, here i’ve used a Kamasan B175. Take a pinch of natural deer hair, sort the longer fibers from the shorter fibers and put into a hair stacked. Repeat this proccess three times for the tail and two wings. Tie in one pinch of deer hair as a tail and secure in place.

Tie in a length of FlyBox Hackle in black for the first third of the body. After each turn, pull the fibers back so they don’t get trapped down and create a full sectioned body. Take the second bunch of deer hair and tie in as a wing, the same length as the tail. Take another colour of fritz , here i’ve used red to create a bibio style pattern. A great colour combination and fly for targeting heather fly feeders!

Take another amount of deer hair and tie in over the middle section of fritz. To finish off, neaten up the head with thread and make a few turns with the remaining black hackle at the head and tie off. Apply a small amount of varnish and the fly is read to use.

Fly of the Week – KJ Red Spinner

Fly of the week - KJ red spinnerWith this not so fish friendly weather, most anglers stay in doors until the temperature drops enough not to get blistered by the sun. This usually means fishing into the evening until darkness falls, a magical time of day if you ask me. As the Dunns return to the water to lay their eggs (the end stage of the dunns life) it releases it’s egg sacks on the surface of the river, the Dunn becomes lifeless and is an easy target for any trout and can provide some of the BEST fishing you can ever find.

More commonly known as a sherry spinner, this pattern has proved deadly for me over the last few weeks, helping secure a team Gold in the Rivers International late June. 

Select a favourite dry fly hook, here I’ve used a Kamasan B170 hooks, a light-wire hook which boasts good strength, especially with the chance of hooking a monster. Run a layer of thread down the shank of the hook and stop just as the hook bends into the gape. You need a strong and reliable thread when tying this fly, try using UTC Thread 70 in brown, it gives a flat spread and practically disappears on the hook.

Select four red game feathers and tie them in as the tail. You can play around with the lengths of the tail to achieve the look that you want – I usually opt to make the tails the same length of the body. Tie in a pearl rib, here I’ve used a small pearl strand from a hank of krinkle flash. For the body, dub a rope of coppery/red dubbing onto the thread, just enough to cover 2/3rds of the hook shank.

Wind the dubbing in touching turns leaving sufficient room for a thorax. Run the rib in evenly spaced segments over the body and tie off.

Take a few strands of brown antron for the thorax cover, you can use any colour you like, but I prefer to keep things colour coordinated. For the wings, take two prime CDC feathers, strip the side of each one and remove the ‘crap’ at the bottom. Position on the top of the hook and secure with the thread. Repeat this three more times using each side of the two CDC feathers.

Dub more dubbing onto the thread and wind around the wings, covering the thorax. Pull the antron thorax cover through the bunch of CDC tips to split, this gives the impression of a spent dunn and allows you to see it at distance. You can also add a white CDC post over the back if you like to give it more visibility into darkness.

Fly of the Week – Red Holographic Sea Trout Tube

Fly of the week - Red Holographic Tube
Red is another favourite for sea trout here in the UK, as well as blue (see last weeks fly of the week here), red has a massive following especially on certain rivers where Sewin seem to prefer a specific colour. This fly is one of our favourites here at Fishtec and has produced some of our best catches when we have time away from the office to get on the river! Give this combination a go, you may just be surprised of the results…

Start off by sliding an aluminium tube onto a tube fly needle and push tightly into the adapter. Here I have used the Eumer Tube Fly Vice, the perfect tool for tying tube flies. Run your thread onto the top of the tube and create a platform to tie the wing onto. This layer of thread will ensure the wind stays firmly in place and not slip through the thread.

Take a pinch of black bear and offer it up to the top of the tube, securing directly to the top side of the tube. Strip off a few strands of red Schlappen and tie in as a throat hackle. Remove the excess over the end of the tube and tie in two strands of Red holographic flash on each side

Take two jungle cock eyes, I prefer packed jungle cock as you get consistently sized feathers. Remove the excess and tie in over the same area of the blue holographic. Remove the waste and whip finish off. Varnish the head to secure the tying in place and you’re done!

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Wales take Gold at Rivers International 2013

Back in 1991, there was a proposal from Geoff Clarkson that the International Fly Fishing Association (IFFA) hosted a ‘Rivers International’ which would be held once a year and rotate around the four countries, with a team of five competitors from each country. The proposal was accepted at the AGM and the first rivers international was decided to be fish on the River Dee, here in Wales in 1992.

How does the Rivers International work?

The match venue is divided into five beats with a competitor from each team competing on each section. Prior to each match a draw takes place to dictating where an angler starts and what sections they are fishing throughout the day.  The match itself consists of four hour and a half sessions throughout the day with the angler changing sections dinner time. The day before the actually competition day the rivers are usually angler free to give the water a rest, but anglers are allowed to walk the river to see what sections they’re fishing once the draw is out.

11 years after the first Rivers International the international came back to Wales, this time down south on the River Taff. Four years previous the competition was fished on the same stretch of the river Taff where Wales took Gold! So there was much pressure on the current Welsh team to follow up with the results.

The Welsh team consisted of three previously capped river international anglers and two new caps, a strong team with a number of great results from all competitors in different competitions.

Rivers International Team Wales

Welsh Team – Paul, Allen, Sean, Neil, Terry, Sion, Kieron

The competition officially started Wednesday 26th June, but being so close to home for the Welsh boys we fished almost every weekend leading up to the competition to give us more of a feel for the river and learn what methods fish best on each section of the river. Most of the teams turned up the Saturday before to get the most out of the weekend and practice on the river. Most other teams wouldn’t have fished here before unless they were in the 2009 team.

Personally I use my practice sessions to refresh my mind of the competition system, taking a controller along with me on pleasure days to measure the fish and record on a score sheet. It’s also a great way of locating the head of fish and learning what sort of numbers you’ll need in each session from each area. The problem is there’s only a handful or river comps throughout the year and it’s difficult to get your head around the system without doing it a few times previous to refresh the mind.

Monday and Tuesday of the competition week was spent strung up in our chest waders walking the whole section of the river, chatting among us describing where each of us has caught fish and on what method. It’s a great way of creating a plan between us all just in case one of us is drawn on a section of river we haven’t recently fished or struggled on previously.

The draw for the beats takes place two days before the competition, giving the anglers time to think about their draw and also walk their beats the day before, usually at the same time they’ll be fishing that section. Terry and I both drew section B1, I was following him onto that section after the interval so we traveled to that beat early Thursday morning for a look. Unfortunately it was a tough section of the river and we failed to see any activity the time we were there. But we were confident to get fish there from the information we’d gathered from our practice days. My other section was the lowest section of river, right at the bottom of the competition water, a couple of pools which in previous comps proved successful.

Thursday night was coming to a close, as a team we were called into the captains room for a final team meeting and a small presentation to the manager and captain for all their hard work. Allen the team captain, presented the team with a set of TF Gear fishing tops to fish in during the international. As a team we were also lucky enough to be sponsored with fly lines from Airflo at trade price and Atom Six fly rods.

Competition day come and we were all set, everyone had their fishing tackle set up and waders on, raring to hit the river for the first session. Each session is an hour and a half long, one of the quickest hour and a half sessions of a competitive anglers lives, not much is remembered as all most are interested in is getting the next fish in the net.

As we approached the interval at dinner time, I couldn’t wait to get back to see how the rest of the team had fared. Personally my sessions went very well. I managed to land 5 fish in both of the morning sessions which put me in 1st position for each session. Turning up at the car park it was clear that Wales were the leaders so far, clear of England by 8 place points. Welsh Team member Terry Bromwell was said to have taken a 64cm Brown Trout which looked almost certain to be biggest fish of the competition!

Terry measuring the biggest fish

Terry measuring the biggest fish

The team was doing well, with the fishing only set to get better in the next few sessions as the fly usually come on and the fish look to the surface for food. After lunch we all set off back to the river ready for the last two sessions.

Terry managed to take 2 in the first session and 3 in the second session from section B1, so I was in for a tough last couple of hours. The fishing was certainly tough, and I managed to take a respectable 2/2 in each session. Coming 3rd in the third session and 1st in the last.

Throughout the competition my best method was certainly dry flies, delicately presenting small flies in calm water using the Airflo SuperDri Elite. For the past few weeks my best fly had been the baby sun fly, a cracking pattern which works well in fast and slow water, along with a red spinner pattern for the tricky fish.

Me and my controller headed back to the hotel in earnest of hearing the rest of the boys results. I was hoping that we’d all taken first or second positions to keep us ahead of the other teams. As each angler came in the results seemed to be getting better and better with talks of 1st’s and 2nd’s in each session. Last to come back was Terry, we’d heard rumors that he had a 2nd and a 1st in the last two sessions, but couldn’t count on it until we’d spoken to him. Terry was certainly in line for top individual rod.

As Terry arrived back he confirmed his positions and it seemed we had climbed the table, keeping us in 1st position taking the Gold! The team was over the moon with the result, along with Terry taking both Top Rod with 5 individual placings and largest fish. Well Done Terry and The Team!

Quick overview of the results:

1. Wales        43 fish  2010 points  36 placings

2. England    25 fish  1249 points  55 placings

3. Ireland     20 fish  1031 points  60 placings

4. Scotland   19 fish   907 points  61 placings

Top Individual: Terry Bromwell (Wales) 5 placings

Largest Fish: Terry Bromwell (Wales) 63.4cms

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FULL RESULTS

At the presentation the teams and trophy winners were all presented with their medals and trophies. Terry taking most of them!!

top-team

Top Team Wales

Terry Collecting Trophies

Terry Collecting Trophies

Fly of the Week – Green Apps

Fly of the Week - Green AppsThis green apps bloodworm is a simpler version of the Red Apps Bloodworm tied last week. This fly consists of just two materials excluding the hook and takes just a couple of minutes to complete. Preferably used on small stillwaters on the dropper of a multiple fly cast, the un-weighted green apps bloodworm will fish well under the bung or as a single fly. Kieron Jenkins shows how to tie his favourite version of this deadly fly pattern – Tie them in a variety of colours and see for yourself!

Take a strong hook and attach it in the vice. Here I have used a Kamasan hook, the B170 Size 10 and Flu Green UTC Thread. You can match the colour of your thread to the flexi floss legs you’ll be adding or contrast the colours to give the fly more attraction.

Run the thread down the hook creating a nice layer of thread on the hook, stop just short of opposite the barb and take a strand of flu green flexi floss. Double the floss up and tie in the looped end, securing along the length of the body ensuring that the all the floss is tied down. Make your way back to the eye and take another strand of flexi floss, double it up and tie off in the same way.

Run the thread over the body a few times to create a neat and even body. Simply whip finish when you’re happy and superglue the body to add extra durability.

Hook: Kamasan b170 Size 10
Thread: Flu Green70 UTC
Body: Thread
Tail: Flexi Floss
Front Legs: Flexi Floss
Glue: Airflo Stik-IT super glue

See more fly tying video on Fishtec TV

Written by Kieron Jenkins