Fly of the Week – Hares Ear Grub

Fly of the week - Hares Ear grub

The Hares Ear is probably one of the most used flies within the fishing community, here’s we’ve tied a variant which lends itself perfectly to river fishing and ideal for targeting trout and especially grayling in the winter months. The heavy tungsten bead gives it added weight to get to the bottom quickly into the fishes feeding zone. Hares ears are very versatile patterns, try changing the colour of the thorax and bead, this will change the fly completely.

Start off by threading a tungsten bead onto your hook. Here I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph hook, it gives a great grubby look to any pattern and is also a great pupa hook. Secure the bead in place by butting up a few turns of lead and fully securing with thread wraps. Cover the lead body to ensure it doesn’t slip down the hook follow the hook shank down around three-quarters of the way around the bend.

Take a length of gold wire and tie in at the back of the hook. Take a decent pinch of Hares ear and create a tight, tapered dubbing rope which will reach the thorax of the fly. Wind in touching turns and secure in place with the gold wire rib. For the thorax I like to use a contrasting colour such as black, orange or yellow. Dub a small amount of dubbing to the thread and wind towards the bead, securing with a whip finish at the head.

Scruffy Hares ear for Grayling 

Hook: Fulling Mill Czech Nymph Size 10
Thread: Black UTC thread
Bead: Gold Tungsten bead 3mm
Underbody: Medium Lead Wire
Rib: Hares Ear
Thorax: Spectra Dub Glister
Varnish: Veniard Clear

Fly of the Week – Pink Glister Bug

Fly of the week - Pink Glister Bug

Everyone who’s ever caught grayling, know that they absolutely love pink. It’s one of those colours that really stand out when anglers talk about what fly they caught on, if it’s a hotspot, or a fully blow pink grub, pink is usually in there somewhere. This glister bug has proven it’s worth in any grayling fishers fly box, this fly pattern has counted for numerous amounts of fish for myself and others I fish with. I wouldn’t be without it.

I tie this fly with many colour tungsten beads but silver has to be my favourite. Take a bead and thread it onto a hook. Here’s I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph size 12. Runa layer of thread onto the shank of the hook, securing the bead in place and bulking up the thorax. Wind your thread onto the hook and cover the lead to ensure it’s securely in place. The pink UTC thread creates a great underbody for the dubbing. Tie in a strip of Large width pearl mylar for the shellback and a silver rib.

Take a decent pink of dubbing and dub into the thread to create an even ‘rope’, tapering slightly thicker towards the head. Wind the glister towards the eye – in touching turns – leaving enough room to tie in the rib and shellback. Pull the pearl over the back keeping it taught and secure in place with the silver wire rib. I’ve added a small piece of pink UV dubbing at the head of the fly to give it a small colour change. And that’s it! Simple, effective and efficient.

 

Fly of the Week – Grayling Pink Tag

Fly of the week - Pink Tag for GraylingPink, as most fly fishermen will know is a well re-known colour for grayling. The lady of the stream is partial to any fly incorporating a spot of pink whether it’s a floss tail, pink glister thorax or a pink wire rib. These pink bugs seem to work particularly well once the Salmon make an appearance and start their spawning habits. The fixation on pink may be due to the amount of  ‘pink’ eggs being released by the female salmon. Or, in many cases, because a lot of anglers use it!

Slide a tungsten bead onto your hook, here I have used a silver bead; 3mm paired with a Kamasan B170 size 12. Secure your thread onto the hook and butt up against the tungsten bead to ensure it stays in place. Run the thread down the hook until the bend in the shank and prepare the tail. Cut a length of Glo-Brite floss and create a plump tail. I like to wrap the floss around my two fingers 8 times to get a good consistent thickness. You can get 4/5 flies out of each length so don’t throw away the off cuts!

Tie the tail in securely and take three strands of peacock herl for the body. The grayling like a mouthful so don’t skimp on the peacock. Tie the herl onto the hook and wrap around the thread, this will ensure durability of the herl as it is very prone to breakages. Wind towards the bead and tie off at the head. Take a brown hen feather, or in this case, a brown grizzle hackle and secure onto the hook. Two or three turns onto the hook and tie off. The hackle gives a lot of movement and helps the fly fool both trout and grayling in fast, medium or slow paced water.

Fishtec stock a full range of fly tying materials and hooks.

Tying Material List

Hook: Kamasan B170 Size 12
Thread: Black UTC 70
Bead: Silver Tungsten
Tail: No 2 Glo Brite
Body: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Brown Hen

Fly of the Week – CDC Red Tag Jig

Fly Of The Week - Red Tag Jig
The Red Tag Jig has been a firm favourite amongst river anglers, both competitive and pleasure, right across Europe and the UK. This pattern is a variation of Martyn Flynn’s ‘red tag’ dry fly which was meant for grayling. Still a very successful fly in it’s dry fly form, the Red Tag has been adapted and varied to create a killer all-round fly pattern. Here’s Kieron Jenkins’ favourite variation.

Take a Fulling Mill Barbless Force Jig Hook and attach a suitable sized bead, here I have used a 3.5mm slotted tungsten bead. Attach the thread – here I have used UTC Thread in black – just behind the bead and build a layer of thread to secure it in place.

Take the thread down to the end of the hook shank and stop just where it bends round. Double up a few strands of Glo-Bright No5 floss and tie in as the tail. Cut, but leave generous amount of floss as the tag, grayling and trout love colour! The length can be varied depending on the attitude of the fish. It’s always good to have some long and some short depending on the pressure the fish get.

Take a large CDC feather and tie in half way along the stalk, with the thick end in hand. Secure in with a few wraps of thread and then pull the feather back so that the tips are tied in. This should give you a generous length of feather to use as the body. Simply latch the hackle pliers onto the end of the CDC feather and wrap in touching turns up the body. The CDC produces a lovely tapered effect as the stalk gets thicker towards the head, and also a very buggy looking profile  as the CDC feathers act as legs.

Tie the feather off and cut the spare stalk away. I like to leave the CDC messy at this stage and run some dubbing through the ‘hackle’ at the head. Dub some glister onto your thread and wind between the CDC and pull any stray fibres back over the fly and tie off the thread. Et-Viola.

Red Tag Jig Tying Materials

Hook: Fulling Mill Force Jig Hook Size 12
Bead: Slotted 3.5mm Gold Tungsten Bead
Thread: Black UTC 70 Denier
Tail: Glo Bright No 5
Body: CDC (wound)
Hackle: CDC
Thorax: Hendz Glister No45

Red Tag Jig Fly

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Grayling Fishing Tackle

Some of the most fun fishermen have in the Winter is chasing the ‘ladies’. Now, this can be taken one of two ways – but I think we’ll stick to the fishing sense.

It is fair to say that winter is fast approaching, October has been the impact of Autumn with leaves falling from the trees and the steady but very noticeable decline in air temperature. With the development of seasons it’s lead to us changing out fishing quarry. Moving away from the Brown and Rainbow trout which inhabit the rivers and lakes, onto the shoals of Grayling of the runs, riffles and glides.

Grayling are predominately a bottom feeding fish, with the down turned mouth making it easier for them to feed from the small and juicy morsels of the river bed. Although, I’ve had some of my best fishing with Grayling on dry flies!

Most angling gear used for river fishing would no doubtingly suffice for Grayling. Tippet strengths will vary with methods, something like 5-6x nylon for nymphing, and 8x for dries.

One of the most important pieces of fishing tackle for Grayling in my opinion is the fishing rod. A hard, fast actioned rod will be a great casting tool for the heavy nymphs, but unfortunately will result in countless numbers of lost fish.

Grayling, big ones especially, like to burrow down onto the bottom, stick their sail like fin up and kite through the flow ‘nodding their heads’ trying to free themselves of the hook. Usually with a stiff rod, the hook will pull out. A softer rod has more play, more forgiveness if you happen to pull to hard, and eventually will tease the fish around into the net (not to say they don’t come off!). A fly rods in the region of 3/4/5 weights will have enough ‘give’ to play the fish easily and allow you to hold the rod out at arms length to get maximum distance with ease whilst European Nymphing.

Recommended Tackle & Flies

One of my most favourite fishing rods for the river in general is the Airflo Streamtec XT Fly rods be it a long 10ft rod for all styles of nymphing, or a shorted 8 or9 ft version for the Dries or Klink and Dink.

My favourite Grayling flies over the past 3-4 years have been all of the same style. Mostly Jig type patterns, with tungsten beads on the head which the fly fishes upside down causing less snags and a better hook up rate.
‘Normal’ nymphs sometimes out-fish these though. Jigs seem to sink too quick when fishing the Klink and Dink, a nymph suspended by a dry fly. Some of my favourite trout flies are tied on straight hooks, probably because they fish with a more natural manner compared to the jig.
As you can see between these two nymphs, there isn’t a lot that changes, just the colour of the bead and the collar. Both Very effective, both have their day it all depends on what sort of mood the fish are in. Give them both a try!

Written by Kieron Jenkins