Fly of the Week – Rhyacophila Caddis

Fly of the Week - Rhyacophila CaddisThe Rhyacophila Caddis is found in almost all rivers around the UK. It’s a free-living caddis, meaning it doesn’t build a ‘house’. The Larvae like caddis favours shallow riffles and often gets caught in the current and drifts freely downstream, this making them ideal food for trout and grayling. The ‘Rhyacs’ hatch later in the afternoon and the adults can provide some great dry fly action when they return to the water. Tying a Rhyac caddis can be complicated, but here’s a simple little pattern we’ve been using for the grayling this winter.

Attach your favoured hook into the vice, here I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph hook. Run your thread along the body to the extreme bend in the hook. Wind a layer of lead into the shank of the hook to add some weight. A tungsten bead can be used but I like these on dropper so a lead underbody is usually enough weight. With your thread, make sure you taper the body to give a slim, streamline effect and ensure you cover the lead with the thread, once the dubbing gets wet, you will get a green glow from the underbody, if you forget to do this, the lead will dampen the colour of the body.

For the rib I’ve used the tag end of thread where I first tied onto the hook. Attach two sides to the fly, FlyBox bleach dyed peacock herl is a great material to imitate the legs. Dub a TIGHT rope of dubbing onto your thread ensuring you get a thin from and back end with a slightly thicker abdomen. In touching turns wind the dubbing towards the eye and pull the side legs along the length of the hook. Secure the body and legs in place with the rib with evenly spaced turns. Tie off and add some black pen to the head of the fly to imitate the Rhyacophila’s wing bud cover.

Fly Tying Materials

Hook: Fulling Mill Czech Nymph 12
Thread: Glo Bright No12
Underbody: Medium Lead Wire
Rib: Glo Bright No12
Body: Rhyac Green Dubbing
Sides: Bleach Dyed Peacock – Chart
Colour: Black Pen

Fly of the Week – Hares Ear Grub

Fly of the week - Hares Ear grub

The Hares Ear is probably one of the most used flies within the fishing community, here’s we’ve tied a variant which lends itself perfectly to river fishing and ideal for targeting trout and especially grayling in the winter months. The heavy tungsten bead gives it added weight to get to the bottom quickly into the fishes feeding zone. Hares ears are very versatile patterns, try changing the colour of the thorax and bead, this will change the fly completely.

Start off by threading a tungsten bead onto your hook. Here I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph hook, it gives a great grubby look to any pattern and is also a great pupa hook. Secure the bead in place by butting up a few turns of lead and fully securing with thread wraps. Cover the lead body to ensure it doesn’t slip down the hook follow the hook shank down around three-quarters of the way around the bend.

Take a length of gold wire and tie in at the back of the hook. Take a decent pinch of Hares ear and create a tight, tapered dubbing rope which will reach the thorax of the fly. Wind in touching turns and secure in place with the gold wire rib. For the thorax I like to use a contrasting colour such as black, orange or yellow. Dub a small amount of dubbing to the thread and wind towards the bead, securing with a whip finish at the head.

Scruffy Hares ear for Grayling 

Hook: Fulling Mill Czech Nymph Size 10
Thread: Black UTC thread
Bead: Gold Tungsten bead 3mm
Underbody: Medium Lead Wire
Rib: Hares Ear
Thorax: Spectra Dub Glister
Varnish: Veniard Clear

Fly of the Week – Pink Glister Bug

Fly of the week - Pink Glister Bug

Everyone who’s ever caught grayling, know that they absolutely love pink. It’s one of those colours that really stand out when anglers talk about what fly they caught on, if it’s a hotspot, or a fully blow pink grub, pink is usually in there somewhere. This glister bug has proven it’s worth in any grayling fishers fly box, this fly pattern has counted for numerous amounts of fish for myself and others I fish with. I wouldn’t be without it.

I tie this fly with many colour tungsten beads but silver has to be my favourite. Take a bead and thread it onto a hook. Here’s I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph size 12. Runa layer of thread onto the shank of the hook, securing the bead in place and bulking up the thorax. Wind your thread onto the hook and cover the lead to ensure it’s securely in place. The pink UTC thread creates a great underbody for the dubbing. Tie in a strip of Large width pearl mylar for the shellback and a silver rib.

Take a decent pink of dubbing and dub into the thread to create an even ‘rope’, tapering slightly thicker towards the head. Wind the glister towards the eye – in touching turns – leaving enough room to tie in the rib and shellback. Pull the pearl over the back keeping it taught and secure in place with the silver wire rib. I’ve added a small piece of pink UV dubbing at the head of the fly to give it a small colour change. And that’s it! Simple, effective and efficient.

 

Fly of the Week – Sedge Hog

Fly of the week - sedgehog

The Sedge hog was devised as a pattern to convert sedge feeders into fish on the bank. This pattern can be fished dry, pulled just on or in the surface or below the surface to attract fish feeding on sedges and other large insects. Part wet fly, part muddler. A very buoyant fly, this pattern gives some great disturbance to attract fish to other flies on your cast. competition bots use these as point flies regularly when other foam or buoyant flies need to be removed.

Attach a strong, but lightweight hook into the vice and run a layer of thread down the hook, here i’ve used a Kamasan B175. Take a pinch of natural deer hair, sort the longer fibers from the shorter fibers and put into a hair stacked. Repeat this proccess three times for the tail and two wings. Tie in one pinch of deer hair as a tail and secure in place.

Tie in a length of FlyBox Hackle in black for the first third of the body. After each turn, pull the fibers back so they don’t get trapped down and create a full sectioned body. Take the second bunch of deer hair and tie in as a wing, the same length as the tail. Take another colour of fritz , here i’ve used red to create a bibio style pattern. A great colour combination and fly for targeting heather fly feeders!

Take another amount of deer hair and tie in over the middle section of fritz. To finish off, neaten up the head with thread and make a few turns with the remaining black hackle at the head and tie off. Apply a small amount of varnish and the fly is read to use.

Fly of the Week – Red Holographic Sea Trout Tube

Fly of the week - Red Holographic Tube
Red is another favourite for sea trout here in the UK, as well as blue (see last weeks fly of the week here), red has a massive following especially on certain rivers where Sewin seem to prefer a specific colour. This fly is one of our favourites here at Fishtec and has produced some of our best catches when we have time away from the office to get on the river! Give this combination a go, you may just be surprised of the results…

Start off by sliding an aluminium tube onto a tube fly needle and push tightly into the adapter. Here I have used the Eumer Tube Fly Vice, the perfect tool for tying tube flies. Run your thread onto the top of the tube and create a platform to tie the wing onto. This layer of thread will ensure the wind stays firmly in place and not slip through the thread.

Take a pinch of black bear and offer it up to the top of the tube, securing directly to the top side of the tube. Strip off a few strands of red Schlappen and tie in as a throat hackle. Remove the excess over the end of the tube and tie in two strands of Red holographic flash on each side

Take two jungle cock eyes, I prefer packed jungle cock as you get consistently sized feathers. Remove the excess and tie in over the same area of the blue holographic. Remove the waste and whip finish off. Varnish the head to secure the tying in place and you’re done!

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Black and Blue Holographic Sea Trout Tube

Fly of the week - black and blue sea trout flyBlack and Blue is one of the most favoured colours for sea trout here in the UK. Sea trout or Sewin anglers choose their fly colours wisely depending on the location of the river, it’s height, how light the night may be, whether it’s cloudy or clear or if the fish are fresh or not. Sewin anglers have their theories why certain flies work and as nearly all fishing, it’s down to what you have confidence with. This fly is one of our favourites here at Fishtec and has produced some of our best catches.

Start off by sliding an aluminium tube onto a tube fly needle and push tightly into the adapter. Here I have used the Eumer Tube Fly Vice, the perfect tool for tying tube flies. Run your thread onto the top of the tube and create a platform to tie the wing onto. This layer of thread will ensure the wind stays firmly in place and not slip through the thread.

Take a pinch of black bear and roll it around the tube to give a splayed effect around the tube to give plenty of movement and very sandeel like type fly. Remove the excess over the end of the tube and tie in two strands of blue holographic flash on each side

Take two jungle cock eyes, I prefer packed jungle cock as you get consistently sized feathers. Remove the excess and tie in over the same area of the blue holographic. Remove the waste and whip finish off. Varnish the head to secure the tying in place and you’re done!

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Fly of the Week – Zig Bug

Fly of the week | Zig Bug

Zig bugs have been the downfall for many carp over the last few months, specifically designed to look like natural insects or bugs, these flies have the power to seduce carp from almost any lake. Tied to represent beetles, grasshoppers, tadpoles and more, you won’t use anything more realistic than a zig bug. The Zig Rig – which this fly is fished on – lets the angler set the depth very accurately, putting the fly exactly where they want, hopefully in front of feeding fish.

Tying a zig bug couldn’t be simpler, simply take a hook which will withstand the pressure from a large carp, here I have used a Kamasan B980 size 6 as it has a large gape and a very strong hold. Run a layer of thread down the hook to create a solid thread platform, a strong thread is recommended for pulling down onto the foam back.

Take a booby eye cylinder and cut at a 45 degree angle from the one edge, creating a tapered cut along the length of the tube. Tie the the ‘shallow’ side ensuring to securely trap the edge under the thread.

For the body I have used FlyBox.co.uk Small Crystal Hackle, remove some excess fibers to reveal a bare core and tie in at the back end of the hook. Run the thread back towards the eye of the hook and form the body. Wind the fritz along the length of the body, here I have doubles back over the fritz to give it more volume. Tie in and cut off when you’re happy with the mass.

Pull the foam back over the fly towards the eye and simply tie in where you’re happy. Cut the excess foam into a ball shape so it resembles a beetle more closely. Whip finish the thread off and the fly is now fishable.

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Fly of the Week – Red Apps Bloodworm

Fly Of The Week - Red Apps Bloodworm

Kieron Jenkins shows how to tie the deadly, but simple red apps bloodworm. Tied with just two materials excluding the hook and the thread, this pattern is one of the quickest, most effect stillwater flies to ever grace our fly boxes. The red apps was designed to imitate bloodworm balling in silt, making a very easy meal for hungry trout. Used as a nymph, under a bung or as a lure, this fly has taken many specimen trout from waters all around the UK including many stillwater records!

Start off by threading six glass beads onto a hook. Here I have used a Kamasan B170 size 10 hook as it gives enough room on the hook to comfortably position six glass beads. Attach your thread just behind the eye of the hook and tie in two strands of flexi-floss. Taper the thread and apply a dab of super glue ensuring to thread the first bead tightly to the eye. The glue will secure the thread and lock the bead in place.

Repeat the process at the back of the hook with another two strands of red flexi-floss. Apply more glue to ensure both the bead and threads security.

Tie an overhand knott in a length of flexi-floss and pass over the front of the hook positioning the knot between the middle of the 6 beads. Pull tight and glue in place, cutting the flexi-floss at your preferred length. You could even leave the middle lengths out if the fly seems too big.

One thing to note with this fly is the beads may twist around the hook, but this isn’t an issue as the two at each end should hold them in place if glued and tied in correctly. Ensure these ‘stoppers’ are secured correctly before fishing with.

Hook: Kamasan b170 Size 10
Thread: Red 70 UTC
Body/Beads: 6x Red Glass Beads
Tail: Flexi Floss
Middle legs: Flexi Floss
Front Legs: Flexi Floss

See more fly tying video on Fishtec TV

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Fly of the Week – UV Crystal Hackle Damsel

Fly Of The Week - UV Crystal Hackle Damsel

The Damsel is one of the most prolific insects which inhabit our lakes here in the UK. This is reflected in what anglers prefer to fish on small waters and reservoirs with most anglers ‘go to’ fly being a damsel of some sort. Variants consist of chain eyes, gold heads or leaded bodies with marabou tails either woven or stacked, both of these additions add the most possible movement. Kieron Jenkins shows how to tie one of the more modern variants using UV Crystal hackle fritz for the body.

Simply start off by attaching a bead of choice to your favourite hook. Here I have chosen the Fulling Mill Grip Gape Hook size 10, with a 3.8 silver brass bead. Attach your UTC Thread to the hook, building up a section of thread behind the bead to stop any slippage then run the thread down the hook creating a solid platform to latch your marabou tail onto.

Take an inch or so of olive marabou from a turkey feather and trim away the end waste. This makes tying the marabou in easier and it also adds less bulk to the body. Run the thread over the marabou to the bead to form a smooth, flat body then take the thread back down to the bend of the hook. Offer up a strand of crinkle flash to each side of the tail for added sparkle and tie in.

For the body I have used FlyBox UV Crystal Hackle in olive colour. The UV adds some extra sparkle in low light conditions, primarily what we get this time of year in the UK! Take the front end of the fritz, the tip where the fibres fall back down the hank. This ensures that each time you wind the fritz each turn falls perfectly into place and sits right. Latch the fritz to the hook and wind – in touching turns – back towards the bead, pulling the fibres back after each turn. Simply tie in, build a little hot spot with the bright coloured thread and tie off.

This pattern can also be tied in many different colour combinations, all black, black and green, white and green, all white… A great versatile pattern for grown on or stocked fish.

UV Crystal Hackle Damsel Tying Materials
Hook: Fulling Mill Heavyweight Champ Barbless Size 10
Thread: Orange UTC 140
Bead: Silver 3.3mm
Tail: Olive Marabou
Flash: Crinkle Flash
Body: Olive UV Crystal Hackle

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Fly of the Week – Chain Eye Cats Whisker

Fly Of The Week - Chain Eye Cats Whisker
Ever wondered how to tie the Chain Eyed Cats Whisker, one of the deadliest patterns on the fly fishing scene since anglers ever cast a line? Have a look at our fly of the week. Designed to catch recently introduced stocked fish, this pattern has proven its effectiveness time and time again. This, however, is a ‘new age’ variation which incorporates some up to date material and additional movement.

Start off by attaching a long shank hook into the vice. Here I have used one of the Fulling Mill range of hooks, the special nymph, size 8. Lay two or three short layers of thread at the head of the hook, this will act as a platform to tie the chain eyes on to. Offer the chain eyes to the hook and tie in with strong thread. Figure of eight your thread around the eyes making sure they are tied in securely, add a dab of super glue if you need too, here I’ve used the new Airflo Stic-IT Anglers Glue.

Once you’re happy with the eyes take the thread to the bottom of the hook, just opposite the barb and peal off a decent amount of white marabou. Cut the waste from the ends and thin out. Tie this onto the hook and secure in place. Tare the ends of the marabou to desired length and then add some additional flash. Two strands of pearl crinkle flash.

For the body I’ve chosen the Flybox Crystal Hackle in Chartreuse. This adds volume and movement to the fly. Simply attach the end to the back of the hook and wind in touching turns – pulling the fibres back each time – towards to head of the hook. Secure in with one or two turns of thread and attach the Flexi Floss legs.

Tying Materials for the Chain Eyed Cat

Hook: Fulling Mill Nymph Special Size 8
Thread: Orange UTC 140
Eyes: Gold Chair Eyes
Glue: Airflo Stic-IT Anglers Super Glue
Tail: White Marabou
Flash: Crinkle Flash
Body: Chartreuse Crystal Hackle
Legs: Chartreuse Flexi Floss