Overnight on the Ouse

7th/ 8th June 2011

It was again the search for big tench that saw me back on the banks of Horseshoe Lake for a two day coarse fishing session. This time, I decided on my first session on Summer Bay for three seasons and elected to fish peg 66 which had, apparently, yielded a few nice fish on the recent Tenchfishers event. In fact, there is little to report. For the two days, I was buffeted by an unseasonably cold wind full in my face and the only action I had was from a very scraggy male tench of about 5lb that put in an appearance just after dawn on the second morning. That was taken on two imitation red maggots fished on a short hair pop up presentation to beat the bottom weed.

I did have a very pleasant interruption on the second day, when Neil Wayte and Dean Macey stopped by for a chat. It was the first time I’d met either and we passed a very pleasant hour talking about matters piscatorial. They then went off to fish the opposite bank of Summer Bay, with the wind at their backs, where it was probably ten degrees warmer than where I was positioned. I found out later from Dean that they had both blanked and had evidence of both the tench and carp busily spawning, so that goes some way to explaining my lack of action.

21st/ 22nd June 2011

After a frustrating carp blank at a difficult syndicate water the previous week, I was on the banks of the Ouse for my first overnight carp and tench session. I love river carping, but have done far too little of it in recent seasons. The previous year, I’d had a couple of autumn sessions, taking nice bream and barbel, but no tench or carp. In the past, however, I’ve had good tench to well over 7lbs as well as carp over 25lbs, so the big fish potential is undeniable. I know of a genuine 9lb plus tench and a good friend took a 33lb mirror last season. Unlike a lot of carp waters, river carping still retains an air of mystery.

Upon my arrival, I spent a fair bit of time finding a suitable area with a little extra depth, good cover in the form of rushes and lilies, but little bottom weed to annoy me. In the end, I settled on a lovely little swim with about seven feet of water in mid river that had a nice clean gravelly bed. Under my bank was weedy, and the far bank was also carpeted in dense lilies, so I put in half a kilo of 14mm boilies along each weed fringe. One fishing rod would fish the far fringe straight across river, while the left hand rod was positioned further downstream adjacent to the near bank weed fringe. I also made up a method mix, mixed with natural water shrimps and lobworm juice, and moulded this round my rig on every cast. Hookbait was a 14mm boilie wrapped in matching paste.

I only fished from early evening until two hours after dawn on each night, grabbing some sleep during the second day, and when I packed up to come home I’d had seven tench to a top fish of 6lb 8ozs plus seven bream to 8lb 10ozs. No carp had put in an appearance but the session was great fun. I’m off there again tomorrow for more of the same. I’ve heard that the stretch has produced bream over 12lbs, very big indeed for flowing water, so that’s another exciting target to complement the tench and carp.

I’ll keep you posted.

 

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Tony Miles

About Tony Miles

Tony Miles, now sadly deceased, hailed from Coventry, and first rose to prominence as a respected specimen hunter in the 1970s. He was a prolific writer for the angling press, and authored a wealth of books including The Complete Specimen Hunter, Elite Barbel, Quest for Barbel, My Way With Chub, and The Carp Years, to name but a few. Famous for his barbel fishing exploits, he also caught huge carp, chub, perch, pike, and bream, in a fishing career spanning many years. Sadly missed by the fishing community, Tony was a true gent and a wonderful angler.

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