Fly of the Week – KJ Red Spinner

Fly of the week - KJ red spinnerWith this not so fish friendly weather, most anglers stay in doors until the temperature drops enough not to get blistered by the sun. This usually means fishing into the evening until darkness falls, a magical time of day if you ask me. As the Dunns return to the water to lay their eggs (the end stage of the dunns life) it releases it’s egg sacks on the surface of the river, the Dunn becomes lifeless and is an easy target for any trout and can provide some of the BEST fishing you can ever find.

More commonly known as a sherry spinner, this pattern has proved deadly for me over the last few weeks, helping secure a team Gold in the Rivers International late June. 

Select a favourite dry fly hook, here I’ve used a Kamasan B170 hooks, a light-wire hook which boasts good strength, especially with the chance of hooking a monster. Run a layer of thread down the shank of the hook and stop just as the hook bends into the gape. You need a strong and reliable thread when tying this fly, try using UTC Thread 70 in brown, it gives a flat spread and practically disappears on the hook.

Select four red game feathers and tie them in as the tail. You can play around with the lengths of the tail to achieve the look that you want – I usually opt to make the tails the same length of the body. Tie in a pearl rib, here I’ve used a small pearl strand from a hank of krinkle flash. For the body, dub a rope of coppery/red dubbing onto the thread, just enough to cover 2/3rds of the hook shank.

Wind the dubbing in touching turns leaving sufficient room for a thorax. Run the rib in evenly spaced segments over the body and tie off.

Take a few strands of brown antron for the thorax cover, you can use any colour you like, but I prefer to keep things colour coordinated. For the wings, take two prime CDC feathers, strip the side of each one and remove the ‘crap’ at the bottom. Position on the top of the hook and secure with the thread. Repeat this three more times using each side of the two CDC feathers.

Dub more dubbing onto the thread and wind around the wings, covering the thorax. Pull the antron thorax cover through the bunch of CDC tips to split, this gives the impression of a spent dunn and allows you to see it at distance. You can also add a white CDC post over the back if you like to give it more visibility into darkness.