New Airflo V2 Fly Fishing Reels In Stock

We recently had some exciting new fly reels land in our warehouse – the new Airflo V2’s. These reels are the follow up to Airflo’s successful V-Lite range of fly reels, which we sold in high volumes for many years.

Nicely finished in silver, red and black, they are a fully machined fly reel range, made out of a solid aluminum block that has been cut to exacting standards.

Airflo V2 fly eel full set

Airflo V2 fly reel full set

On first impression, they are a fantastic looking range of reels and appear to be incredibly well built with a solid disc drag. The drag itself is completely sealed, allowing them to be used in saltwater environments with no danger of failure. Construction wise, while a fraction heavier they are just as robust and well screwed together as the old V-Lite’s, and like their predecessor provide plenty of backing space thanks to the deep V shaped recess found on the spool.

Surprisingly, the prices are pitched lower than the V-Lite, offering a way into the premium quality reel market for anglers on a lesser budget.

Prices start at just £109.99 for the 3/4 size. Other models include the 5/6 at £119.99, the 7/8 at £129.99 plus a 9/10 and 10/11 for the double hand and switch fly rod users priced at £139.99 and £149.99 respectively.

The Airflo V2 fly reel has a fully sealed disc drag

The Airflo V2 fly reel has a fully sealed disc drag

As an introductory offer, they also come supplied with a FREE Airflo fly line – the Super Dri Elite in the case of the trout models and a Scandi head for the double handed sizes. This makes the package as a whole incredible value for money.

With a model for everyone, the Airflo V’2’s quite simply represent the best value fly reels we have seen for many years! Get yours today.

 Premium performance and good looks
 Fully machined aluminium construction
 V cut spool for extra backing capacity
 Strong, fully sealed saltwater proof drag
 Sizes: 3/4, 5/6, 7/8, 9/11 & 10/11
 Prices from £109.99 to £149.99
 FREE Airflo fly line included

AIRFLO V2 REEL TROUT MODELS ARE AVAILABLE HERE

AIRFLO V2 REEL DOUBLE HAND MODELS ARE AVAILABLE HERE

Airflo V2 fly fishing reel

Airflo V2 fly fishing reels represent brilliant value for money

Fly Tying Gear – Hardwear Fly Tying Tool Range

With the winter months on the horizon many anglers now begin fly tying over the cold, dark months so their fly boxes are well stocked in time for the start of next season.

If you are thinking of starting, or need a budget conscious set of quality tying tools then the Hardwear range could be the answer. Here, Trout Fisherman magazine talk us through the range.

Fly-tying gear: Robbie Winram brings you news and reviews of the latest materials and tools to hit the market.

Tools to get you started

These ‘entry level’ Hardwear tools will get your fly-tying journey off to a good start without breaking the bank.

1 Rotary hackle pliers £3.49
The revolving feature of these pliers ensures the hackle doesn’t twist out of line when you wrap it around the hook shank. The sprung-metal jaws holds materials firmly and the knurled aluminium handle ensures a comfortable and reliable grip.

2 Dubbing brush £3.49
The wire brush is fairly stiff so when you are picking out dubbing and other fibres just tread carefully. It is set into a knurled aluminium handle which makes it easy to grip and comfortable to use.

3 Deluxe whip finish tool £2.99
While it is possible to create a whip finish with your fingers, if you’re not that nimble fingered or have rough skin you might find a whip finish tool an easier solution. Once you get used to how it works it is very easy to use and produces a neat and secure head (visit www.troutfisherman.co.uk and search for ‘the whip finish’ for a demonstration).

4 Hackle pliers £2.50
These traditional English-style spring-loaded hackle pliers have a set of long jaws and two finger pads to depress for opening and closing. The inside face of the jaws are not ridged or raised so I would add a little bit of silicone rubber tubing on one jaw to give extra grip on slippery materials.

5 Bobbin holder £2.99
A traditional spring-arm design with a stainless steel tube and brass feet. It will take a range of small and large bobbins. While the thread tube is very smooth it is not ceramic lined so don’t overwork your thread in one place or you could weaken it.

6 Four-inch scissors £3.99
These have 1.25-inch blades and are non-serrated, giving a clean cut on a range of
materials.

7 Arrowpoint spring scissors £4.99
These are five inches long and being spring loaded are ideal for repetitive cutting strokes. Just depress the handles between thumb and forefinger to cut, then release the pressure to open the blades. The scissors have three quarter-inch long blades with extra fine points, ideal for close in, accurate cutting.

8 Fly-tying scissors £3.99
The same size as the four-inch scissors, but these have extra-large open finger loops. They would be a good choice if you have chunky fingers, but my personal preference is for the standard loops as I find them more comfortable. The fine point blades are super sharp for an excellent close cut.

Hardwear fly tying tools are available here.

 

Fly Tying for Beginners Part 3: The Beaded Hare’s Ear

The Hare’s Ear fly

The Hare’s Ear fly
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

Scruffy, weighty and darned useful for river and stillwater fly fishing alike, the Hare’s Ear is one of the truly indispensable patterns in any angler’s box. It’s also an absolute piece of cake to tie, even if you’re all thumbs at the vice. In fact, you could argue that the scruffier the finish, the better the fly. In his new series of step-by-step fly-tying guides, Dom Garnett shows you how to tie the Beaded Hare’s Ear.

Tying your own flies

The Hare’s Ear will bring bites all year round, on still and running waters alike.

The Hare’s Ear will bring bites all year round, on still and running waters alike.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

So far in this series, we’ve shown you a dead simple dry fly, along with an equally straightforward hackled wet fly. As we move into autumn, though, our next fly is going to be a slightly weightier affair. Quite literally, with the addition of a small brass bead.

The practice of adding small metallic beads to flies seems to have been going on since Izaak Walton was in nappies, but to this day it remains a really simple way of adding extra mass and attraction to all sorts of different flies. Few are more universally effective than the Hare’s Ear.

Scruffy does it

Like all the flies in this series, the Hare’s Ear (sometimes abbreviated to GRHE –“Gold Ribbed Hare’s Ear) is not an incredibly realistic creation. It’s suggestive or “general fit”. It’s not origami or master craftsmanship – it just looks seriously edible in the water. Don’t be fooled into thinking its rough simplicity makes this fly inferior to the amazing little works of art you see in glossy magazines and tying shows. Does it resemble a shrimp? Or perhaps a caddis larva? The fish seem to care even less than we do, because more often than not they’ll try to eat it.

In fact, my older brother and I experimented over many seasons comparing different flies. He got the tying bug bad, making Rhyacophila, Heptagenids and the rest (typical scientist, he gets off on this stuff). But the more we fished, certainly on our wild streams at home, the more apparent it seemed that a scruffy fly, finished in five minutes flat, would routinely outfish some incredibly accurate little work of art. And when you cast that scruffy five-minute fly into a tree, there’s less wailing and gnashing of teeth.

What am I driving at here, then? Well, I don’t want to denigrate realistic fly tying. It’s beautiful, creative and clever. It’s like painting a wonderful portrait, rather than just quickly taking a selfie. If you fish on rivers where the fish are very selective or see a lot of angling pressure, it can be useful, too. But for most of your fly fishing, the Hare’s Ear is a simple, brilliant pattern you just have to have!

What you need to tie the Hare’s Ear

A very simple recipe: hooks, beads, fur, wire and thread… and that’s it.

A very simple recipe: hooks, beads, fur, wire and thread… and that’s it.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

There are loads of variations on the classic Hare’s Ear fly. You can mess about with different dubbings, beads and the rest. You can add fancy tails or a thorax. Once you’ve sussed it, go ahead and knock yourself out. For now though, we’re going to make this most basic of fly patterns seriously easy to tie with a few basic tools and ingredients.

One notable main material is the namesake “hare’s ear” dubbing. Yes, you can substitute this for modern dubbings, but do try it with the real hare’s fur first. Nothing is quite so beautifully spiky and full of life. Buy yourself a full, natural “mask”. Yes, it’s a bit grim. If you live with any vegetarians, you might want to hide it so they don’t freak out.

Take a look at the material though, and marvel at it for yourself. There are lighter and darker coloured bits of fur. There are softer and spikier parts too. All of this can be used- if you pinch firmly with thumb and forefinger and tear out in little pinches. Less is always more with dubbing!

Here’s what you need:

Hook: Nymph or grub hook, size 12-18
Head: Brass or coloured bead, to suit (typically 2mm-3.5mm)
Thread: Tan or Brown
Rib: Silver or gold wire
Body: Dubbed hare’s mask, natural

Tying the Hare’s Ear, step by step

Pass a suitable sized bead onto the hook. run some thread onto the hook just behind in close turns. Pinch in place at first, before overlapping until it catches tight.

STEP 1: Pass a suitable sized bead onto the hook. If you catch the hook in the vice at a slight slope it should stay put. Now run some thread onto the hook just behind in close turns. Pinch in place at first, before overlapping until it catches tight.

STEP 2: As you proceed down the hook shank in tight, touching turns, bind in a length of gold or silver wire as you go. This will form your “rib” (which gives the fly a segmented look and also helps keep the body neatly secured so you don’t end up with a dog’s breakfast when a few trout have savaged the thing). Stop just above the barb of the hook, or just beyond the point on a barbless hook.

STEP 2: As you proceed down the hook shank in tight, touching turns, bind in a length of gold or silver wire as you go. This will form your “rib” (which gives the fly a segmented look and also helps keep the body neatly secured so you don’t end up with a dog’s breakfast when a few trout have savaged the thing). Stop just above the barb of the hook, or just beyond the point on a barbless hook.

STEP 3: Prepare your dubbing. Pinch and tear off a few fibres as shown. You can pick light or dark as you please. I try to get a mix of soft and spiky bits, to give the fly suitable “bugginess” (if that’s even a word). Don’t go too bonkers, as you only need a little to make a single fly.

STEP 3: Prepare your dubbing. Pinch and tear off a few fibres as shown. You can pick light or dark as you please. I try to get a mix of soft and spiky bits, to give the fly suitable “bugginess” (if that’s even a word). Don’t go too bonkers, as you only need a little to make a single fly.

STEP 4: Add the dubbing to your thread – you might need to have the bobbin a bit lower under the hook to give room. Do this by spreading out the dubbing material between your thumb and index finger and “roll” on the thread, as above. It can take practice to get perfect, so keep at it. If you resolutely fail to get the dubbing to stick to the thread, treat the thread with a touch of hair gel. We won’t tell anyone. You may end up with not enough or too much dubbing on the thread. This is quite normal! You can always pinch off a little or roll a tad more as you go.

STEP 4: Add the dubbing to your thread – you might need to have the bobbin a bit lower under the hook to give room. Do this by spreading out the dubbing material between your thumb and index finger and “roll” on the thread, as above. It can take practice to get perfect, so keep at it. If you resolutely fail to get the dubbing to stick to the thread, treat the thread with a touch of hair gel. We won’t tell anyone. You may end up with not enough or too much dubbing on the thread. This is quite normal! You can always pinch off a little or roll a tad more as you go.

STEP 5: Once you have the dubbing on the thread, apply it to the body in nice even turns so that you get a tidy profile. That said, we want plenty of those wiry fibres sticking out, so don’t panic if there’s a bit of mess.

STEP 5: Once you have the dubbing on the thread, apply it to the body in nice even turns so that you get a tidy profile. That said, we want plenty of those wiry fibres sticking out, so don’t panic if there’s a bit of mess.

STEP 6: Now for the rib. Bring the wire from back to front, in nice even turns, trapping the dubbing in place. It’s easiest to do this by changing hands as you go up the hook. When you reach just behind the head, trap the wire with a few tight turns of tying thread. Notice I’ve left a little gap behind the bead.

STEP 6: Now for the rib. Bring the wire from back to front, in nice even turns, trapping the dubbing in place. It’s easiest to do this by changing hands as you go up the hook. When you reach just behind the head, trap the wire with a few tight turns of tying thread. Notice I’ve left a little gap behind the bead.

STEP 7: Now, if you wiggle the wire back and forward, it will neatly break clean off. Much better than knackering your scissors trying to trim wire!

STEP 7: If you wiggle the wire back and forward, it will neatly break clean off. Much better than knackering your scissors trying to trim wire!

STEP 8: Now take another, smaller pinch of dubbing, and apply to the thread. Use some of the darker fibres from the hare’s mask, to create a bit of contrast. You could also go for a touch of bright colour such as red or orange though.

STEP 8: Take another, smaller pinch of dubbing, and apply to the thread. Use some of the darker fibres from the hare’s mask, to create a bit of contrast. You could also go for a touch of bright colour such as red or orange though.

STEP 9: Build up just enough dubbing to finish the fly, before whip finishing just behind the bead

STEP 9: Build up just enough dubbing to finish the fly, before whip finishing just behind the bead (this is easier watched than described, so take a peek at Peter Gathercole’s online tutorial).

TOP TIP: Your fly is ready to fish. However, many fly tyers like to liven it up a bit by picking out the fibres with a bit of velcro. This isn’t a pretty, faultless fly – those straggly bits all help to add life! Whether the fish take them for legs, feelers or little breathers, they move in the water and suggest life.

TOP TIP: Your fly is ready to fish. However, many fly-tyers like to liven it up a bit by picking out the fibres with a bit of velcro. This isn’t a pretty, faultless fly – those straggly bits all help to add life! Whether the fish take them for legs, feelers or little breathers, they move in the water and suggest something edible.

Further Hare’s Ear tips and variations

Variations and twists on the Hare’s Ear fly.

Variations and twists on the Hare’s Ear fly.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

If you fished little other than the fly I’ve just shown you, you could catch plenty of fish from streams and small stillwaters alike. In fact, the trout won’t begrudge your lack of artistry one bit. Keep your flies nice and scruffy and fish them where the trout expect to find things like shrimp and hog lice (i.e. the weedy margins of a small lake, or the bed of the stream) and you won’t go far wrong. On rivers, this tends to mean trundling along with the speed of the current, whereas on small stillwaters I like a picky figure of eight retrieve.

The simplest of Hare’s Ears will catch plenty of fish. That said, it’s fun and useful to add some extra touches to your Hare’s Ear flies. My favourite twists are:

  • Use a different type of bead. Try hot orange for dirty water, for example, or tungsten for extra weight.
  • Hackles and tails aren’t strictly necessary, but can add extra attraction. Partridge fibres or Coq de Leon make lovely tails and legs. Or add a CDC hackle for extra, wispy movement when wet.
  • Dubbings are also wide open for experimentation. Original hare’s mask is excellent, but you can get sparkly substitutes that are easier to dub. You could even add some brighter colour, such as red or orange, just behind the bead as a bit of a “hot spot”.
  • Of course, different hooks will also give different effects to your fly. You can tie a Hare’s Ear on any straight nymph hook, but a curved shrimp hook gives a lovely effect too.
  • But perhaps the biggest change for many anglers has been the switch to “jig hooks” (like the right-hand fly in the shot above). This design of hook will make the fly fish “point up” and seems to reduce snagging the bottom on rivers, while many believe it also leads to more hook-ups when fish bite.
  • Don’t forget to tie your flies in a good spread of sizes, too. I find a size 12 ideal for rainbows, especially for trying the edges of smaller, weedy lakes. Meanwhile, a size 16 with a smaller bead is ideal for most small to mid sized trout and grayling fishing on the river. That said, weeny little Hare’s Ears in sizes right down to a 20 can be superb for roach and dace.

Wherever you fish, you’d be hard pressed to find a more useful all-round fly pattern than the good old Hare’s Ear. Happy tying and fishing!

Read more from Dom Garnett

Regular Fishtec blogger Dom Garnett can also be caught every week in the Angling Times, while you can also find more on his site www.dgfishing.co.uk and the Angling Trust’s Lines on the Water blog.

The Sunray Shadow; versatility and simplicity personified

The sunray shadow is an immensely useful and versatile fly, often provoking a reaction when nothing else will. It can work throughout the season and under almost all river levels and conditions.

They work well for salmon, of course, but also work extremely well for sea trout, becoming a ‘must-have’ pattern on the likes of the Rio Grande in Argentina but also on rivers closer to home. Brown trout will often attack them too, provoking a cannibalistic reaction from fish of all sizes.

The Sunray Shadow fly

The Sunray Shadow fly – useful and versatile!

They are, as a rule, easy to dress. Indeed, in the most simplistic form they can literally be a stack of black fur over white fur! However, as a rule we are content with something a little more aesthetically pleasing, which is often when and why patterns evolve from their original state.

A myriad of different dressings exist for the pattern and no doubt it has ‘evolved’ over the years to suit certain situations, different imaginations or even access to materials. The following is my interpretation and has served me well when dressing smaller sizes and, in particular, when dressing onto hooks rather than tubes.

For salmon, sea trout and even brown trout the Sunray Shadow is an effective fly

For salmon, sea trout and even brown trout the Sunray Shadow is an effective fly

TYING INGREDIENTS

Hook: Partridge Patriot up eye double – sizes 6-14

Body: Silver holographic flat braid tinsel. Place some superglue on the thread base before wrapping over the braid. This will help protect the body from unravelling.

False Hackle: White arctic runner – loose/fine underfur removed

Wing 1: White arctic runner – loose/fine underfur removed. To stop the wing wrapping around the hook, you may also support this finer fur with a few white bucktail fibres if you wish.

Wing 2: Silver holographic lite brite

Wing 3: Black arctic fox – loose/fine underfur removed. Or, my personal favourite, especially for smaller sunrays, is American opossum. Draw out some tips before tying in, which will help taper the wing.

Wing 4: 3-4 peacock herl tips

Cheeks: Jungle cock – optional

Do dress them in different lengths, and vary the one being fished according to colour and water temperature. Don’t be afraid to fish them from 1 inch long through to 8-10 inches on tube versions. Do also make some with a gold body and gold lite brite underwing, then replace the white arctic runner with yellow or chartreuse, this can be a great pattern, especially in coloured/peat-stained water.

A sea trout that fell for the charms of the Sunray Shadow

A sea trout that fell for the charms of the Sunray Shadow

Steffan Jones has fished for sea trout all over the world, but the Teifi and Towy Rivers in West-Wales are his home waters and where he honed his skills. These rivers became his laboratories on which to test theories and fine-tune fly patterns. He has guided people onto sea trout for over twenty years and recently released a book on sea trout fishing – for more information please contact book@sea-trout.co.uk

Sea Trout Surface Lures; Striking the Perfect Balance

When it comes to sea trout flies the ones I tend to adapt and experiment with the most are undoubtedly surface lures. The reason why is simple; they are the hardest ones to get right, but, more importantly, the ones that need to be right in order to maximise their effectiveness and hooking efficiency.

The ultimate sea trout surface lure?

The ultimate sea trout surface lure?

Surface lures are deadly. If you enjoy night-time fishing for sea trout then chances are you already have a handful within your arsenal. If you do not, then that is something you really need to rectify as soon as possible as they can often get a reaction or save a blank night when nothing else provokes a reaction. They can work throughout the year and are worth trying no matter what the conditions. However, as a rule, they do work better when the water has warmed up and also tend to work better later in the season.

Without getting too technical, the most important attribute of a surface lure beyond creating a wake is to fish ‘in’ rather than ‘on’ the surface. This may sound simple, but it is actually difficult to achieve this critical balance. However, achieving it can mean the difference between a reaction to the fly and a secure hook-up. For those looking to cover the science of the surface lure more in-depth then please do refer to the surface lure chapter within my book, which was released in February 2018 (Sea Trout Tips, Tricks & Tribulations).

Material choice is paramount. Different properties will achieve different results. Too buoyant and the sea trout will push the surface lure away when attempting to intercept, too heavy and the fly will sink, negating its purpose and application. For me, to achieve this perfect balance you need to use a combination of materials, some being more buoyant than others, securing the equilibrium.

Hook placement is also worthy of careful consideration. Ideally the hook/s ride under the water’s surface, which helps anchor the overall fly in the surface film whilst also making them easy for the sea trout to intercept. Also on the hook front; have confidence in single hooks. I firmly believe they give the best hook-hold of all, but also make for easier release of the fish with minimal damage – they are too precious to be caught just once, especially given their multi-spawning nature.

After much trial and error I believe the following pattern is as close to perfect as I will achieve. It rides well in the surface, the hooks are placed strategically from a hooking perspective and the overall dressing still has a nice thick, fussy profile but remains relatively aerodynamic as there is minimal bulk. The use of shrink tubing for the mount ensures the best chance of landing the fish once hooked, as it moves with the fish rather than hinging, yet is not too malleable that it doubles back on itself.

Deer hair is used partly for its buoyancy, but more for its messy profile and silhouette. It is cut flat on the top and bottom, retaining the length on both sides – the part that will cast the silhouette. Clipping the deer hair closely on the bottom helps the fly ride low in the surface but also allows clear access to the hook point for the fish. The main buoyancy comes from black plastazote foam. However, this buoyancy is stacked high on the fly, keeping the hooks and main dressing low; either in or below the surface film. This is perfect, as you get the main wake from the deer hair, but the major buoyancy from the foam – best of both worlds. Also, the positioning of the foam accentuates the fishing angle, forcing the body and tail of the fly to break the surface film. This, again, helps create a perfect presentation; easily intercepted and engulfed by the sea trout.

Dress them in different lengths. Some nights a smaller surface lure will be required and will be taken far more confidently than a larger one, which may only be splashed at. If the water is cooler or if there is a lot of mist on the water where very little seems to be provoking a reaction then much larger surface lures need to be deployed for a reaction – an overall dressing of three inches would certainly not be excessive.

Sea trout surface lures - tied to catch more fish!

Sea trout surface lures – tied to catch more fish!

TYING INGREDIENTS

Front hook: Wide gape, mid shank – Partridge Attitude Extra is a good option; size

Trailing hook: Partridge Nordic Tube Single; size 6-8

Link:
30lb+ braid with 2.4mm black shrink tubing over – make sure not to damage the braid when heating the shrink tubing.

Body:
Holographic silver flat braid

Wing 1: Black bucktail

Wing 2: Pearl crystal hair

Head 1: Black deer hair

Head 2: 4-6mm black plastazote foam sheet

As an optional extra; you may place a dab of superglue on top of the black foam then dip this part into glow-in-the-dark powder, which is charged by torchlight. Place this on the back section rather than the front lip. You will be able to see the surface lure track across the pool, which is very exciting. You see the glow, but the fish just see the silhouette.

Steffan Jones has fished for sea trout all over the world, but the Teifi and Towy Rivers in West-Wales are his home waters and where he honed his skills. These rivers became his laboratories on which to test theories and fine-tune fly patterns. He has guided people onto sea trout for over twenty years and recently released a book on sea trout fishing – for more information please contact book@sea-trout.co.uk

Fly-tying For Beginners Part 2: The F-Fly

Classic, traditional dry flies can give even experienced fly-tyers nightmares. However, the good news is that one of the deadliest of all modern floating flies is an absolute cinch to tie, even for beginners. In this new mini series of step-by-step fly-tying guides, fishing author Dom Garnett shows you how to tie the F-Fly.

Tying your own flies

The F-Fly is easy to tie, even for beginners

The F-Fly
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

For anyone who has inspected beautifully tied trout flies, it can be both an inspiring and deflating experience. All those perfect little wings and legs, insanely accurate proportions and elegant touches.

As a lump of a man with hands as delicate as garden shovels, I’m living proof that even the less dextrous among us can create neat, effective flies with the right equipment. When you’re just beginning, things like realistic wings can wait. Lovely though they are, you don’t need such details to catch fish. In fact, you could happily catch more than your fair share with just a small number of very basic flies. The F-Fly is definitely one on my shortlist.

The simplest of dry flies ever!

The F-Fly will work on just about any river with trout and grayling.

The F-Fly will work on just about any river with trout and grayling.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

So how basic are we talking? Well, clever old stick Marjan Fratnik must have got very few ooohs and ahhhhs when he first hit upon his excellent dry pattern, the F-Fly. In fact, the more likely response was probably “um… is that it?” or “have you been getting your five-year-old nephew to tie your flies again, Marjan?”

The F-Fly is a simple combination of thread or dubbing body, with a really basic wing made of CDC feathers. It’s the latter that are the real secret. Not only do the natural oils and structure of the feathers from a duck’s backside float beautifully, they also look lovely and move well.

Of course, being less complicated than a Eurovision song contest entry also has its advantages. With such a simple blueprint, you can tailor the sizes and colours really easily. And you can tie them so quickly you’ll have loads of spares and can spend even more time fishing. Complete win!

Here’s what you need:

Hook: Dry fly size 12-22
Thread: Black or colour of your choice
Dubbing: Fine dry fly dubbing
Wing: Natural CDC

How to tie the F-Fly: step-by-step

The F-Fly is a very versatile pattern indeed. It works in many sizes and colours. Perhaps the most useful sizes are 14 to 18. Practising your first efforts with a hook no larger than a 14 makes sense though, as you can always get finer as you get the hang of it.

As for the ingredients, you don’t need to stock up on many materials. You can by Cul-de-canard feathers in various colours, but you could do just fine with standard, natural CDC (a greyish beige colour). The only other colour I usually bother with is white. As for body colours, you could use any fine dubbing. Stripped quill also looks lovely – or you could simply use thread for smaller flies. I’ve chosen natural CDC, with a black body, because “smallish and black” is such a universally useful blueprint on both rivers and stillwaters.

STEP 1: Run some thread onto the hook, overlapping a few turns until it catches tight.

STEP 1: Run some thread onto the hook, overlapping a few turns until it catches tight. Trim off the loose end to keep things tidy.

STEP 2: Run the thread along the hook shank in tidy, touching turns, until you reach a point just above the hook point or barb.

STEP 2: Run the thread along the hook shank in tidy, touching turns, until you reach a point just above the hook point or barb.

STEP 3: Take a tiny pinch of dubbing and pull it apart between your fingers. Between thumb and forefinger, rub it evenly along the thread. With practice, you should be able to get it fairly even. Again, less is more with most flies!

STEP 3: Take a tiny pinch of dubbing and pull it apart between your fingers. Between thumb and forefinger, rub it evenly along the thread. With practice, you should be able to get it fairly even. Again, less is more with most flies!

STEP 4: Run the dubbing-laden thread back towards the eye in even turns, keeping the body as even as you can. Stop just before the eye, leaving a little gap so there’s space for the wing. You might need to carefully pinch or pull off a little excess dubbing at this point.

STEP 4: Run the dubbing-laden thread back towards the eye in even turns, keeping the body as even as you can. Stop just before the eye, leaving a little gap so there’s space for the wing. You might need to carefully pinch or pull off a little excess dubbing at this point.

STEP 5: Pick out some CDC. For a small fly (size 16-20), two feathers will often be enough. For a larger fly, you might use three or four feathers of roughly the same length. Pinch them together so that the tips are level.

STEP 5: Pick out some CDC. For a small fly (size 16-20), two feathers will often be enough. For a larger fly, you might use three or four feathers of roughly the same length. Pinch them together so that the tips are level.

STEP 6: Now pinch the feathers in place above the hook and secure with 3-4 turns of thread. Make a slightly lighter turn first, followed by a tighter wrap or two is best. Don’t worry if you get it wrong, just undo and try again – no harm done. The right proportion of wing is subject to taste, but just beyond the end of the hook looks about right.

STEP 6: Now pinch the feathers in place above the hook and secure with 3-4 turns of thread. Make a slightly lighter turn first, followed by a tighter wrap or two is best. Don’t worry if you get it wrong, just undo and try again – no harm done. The right proportion of wing is subject to taste, but just beyond the end of the hook looks about right.

STEP 7: Take a sharp, fine-tipped pair of scissors and trim off the CDC as tight as you can. This is where good quality scissors will serve you well – treat yourself to a decent pair!

STEP 7: Take a sharp, fine-tipped pair of scissors and trim off the CDC as tight as you can. This is where good quality scissors will serve you well – treat yourself to a decent pair!

STEP 8: Once you’ve trimmed off the CDC, cover the leftover stumps with a few tight, tidy wraps of thread and form a neat “head”.

STEP 8: Once you’ve trimmed off the CDC, cover the leftover stumps with a few tight, tidy wraps of thread and form a neat “head”.

STEP 9: Now all that remains is to finish the fly. A whip finish tool gives the best result (take a peek at an online tutorial such as this one by Peter Gathercole). Failing that you could just add a spot of varnish and trim when the head’s dry. You’ll find a dubbing needle handy to apply varnish. Once the varnish dries, the fly is ready to fish! With practice you can easily tie one in just 5 minutes.

STEP 9: Now all that remains is to finish the fly. A whip finish tool gives the best result (take a peek at an online tutorial such as this one by Peter Gathercole). Failing that you could just add a spot of varnish and trim when the head’s dry. You’ll find a dubbing needle handy to apply varnish. Once the varnish dries, the fly is ready to fish! With practice you can easily tie one in just 5 minutes.

Further F-Fly tips and variations

Variations are simple, whether it’s a larger, livelier sedge fly imitation, or right down to a size 20 for days when the fish are feeding on the tiny stuff.

Variations are simple, whether it’s a larger, livelier sedge fly imitation, or right down to a size 20 for days when the fish are feeding on the tiny stuff.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

This fly is so universally useful, it’s hard not to love it. Just keep it simple and tidy, and you can’t go wrong. That said, it can be tied in various sizes and colours for different scenarios. It’s a belter for trout and salmon, but in smaller sizes I also love this fly for dace and other small-mouthed coarse fish. The materials are so soft that even delicate feeders will suck it in with ease!

My favourite twists are:

  • Step up to a size 12 or even a 10 and use rougher dubbing (such as hare’s ear) and you have a lovely, simple but lively caddis fly.
  • Or, for low, clear water or where you find tiny insects, the F-Fly is simple enough to dress a 20-24 hook! Dark colours are great for gnats, while a tiny green-bodied fly is superb as a greenfly.

Happy tying and fishing!

Read more from Dom Garnett

Regular Fishtec blogger Dom Garnett can also be caught every week in the Angling Times, while you can also find more on his site www.dgfishing.co.uk and the Angling Trust’s Lines on the Water blog.

Fly-tying for beginners part 1: The Black & Peacock Spider

If you’ve just started learning to tie flies, take heart, you needn’t be an expert to create really effective fish catchers! In this new mini series of step-by-step fly-tying guides, fishing author Dom Garnett shows us a handful of his favourite “simple but deadly” flies.

Tying your own flies

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The black & peacock spider.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

The world of fly-tying can seem a pretty bewildering place these days. From the starting point of a hook and thread, the possibilities and sheer range of materials are vast. Some anglers can tie incredible works of art or amazingly detailed insect replicas. But there’s nothing wrong with keeping things simple.

If you’re after fly-tying tips for beginners, the patterns in this series should prove nice and easy to tie. That said, there’s no harm in more experienced tyers getting back to basics. I’ll also show you how, with just a little tweak here and there, some really simple, quick flies can be incredibly versatile – and well worth a second look!

What is a spider fly?

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The simple ingredients: you just need a hook, thread, peacock herl and hen feather.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

For those new to fly-tying, spiders are simple, soft-hackled flies with a rich tradition in the UK. They’re not perfect insect replicas (and in spite of the name, they don’t copy actual spiders), but suggestive creations, often with just a thread body and “legs” fashioned from feather fibres. Perhaps this is why they’re so useful?

The Black and Peacock Spider has to be one of the most classic, versatile flies of all time. No other fly has caught me such a huge variety of fish, from wild brown trout to rudd, roach and carp. It’s also lovely and simple to tie. With a bit of practice you can turn one out in less than five minutes. Just as well, because I get through dozens every season.

Here’s what you need:

Hook: Wide gape nymph, grub or buzzer, size 12-16
Thread: Black
Tag (optional): Contrasting tinsel or wool of your choice
Body: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Black hen

How to make the black & peacock spider: step-by-step

making a black and peacock spider fly - Run some black thread onto the hook, leaving a little gap behind the eye. Pinch in place, until a few turns of thread catch in securely.

STEP 1: Run some black thread onto the hook, leaving a little gap behind the eye. Pinch in place, until a few turns of thread catch in securely. Trim the loose end if necessary.

making a black and peacock spider fly - Run the black thread in neat, touching turns down the hook shank. If you want to add a “butt” or “tag” of brighter colour at the rear, now is the time to catch it in. I’ve used red UV tinsel here.

STEP 2: Now run the black thread in neat, touching turns down the hook shank. If you want to add a “butt” or “tag” of brighter colour at the rear, now is the time to catch it in. To keep the body even, use a long strip of material and trap all the way down the back. I’ve used red UV tinsel here.

making a black and peacock spider fly - Pick out a couple of strands of peacock herl. Pick finer pieces for a tiny fly, or go thicker for a bigger, bushier number. Stroke the fibres back with your fingers so they fluff out

STEP 3: Pick out a couple of strands of peacock herl. Pick finer pieces for a tiny fly, or go thicker for a bigger, bushier number. Stroke the fibres back with your fingers so they fluff out, as above.

making a black and peacock spider fly - tie in the peacock herl, clamping down right the way down the back of the hook shank to keep things nice and even.

STEP 4: Now tie in the peacock herl, clamping down right the way down the back of the hook shank to keep things nice and even. If you tie just by the “tips” you get an uneven less secure body, so go right down the hook and bring the thread back to the rear of the fly.

making a black and peacock spider fly - wrap the thread around the peacock strands to trap the peacock in place and make it secure.

STEP 5: Next, we wrap the thread around the peacock strands. You don’t absolutely have to do this, but doing so traps the peacock in place better and makes for a much more secure fly, that won’t unravel after a fish or two.

making a black and peacock spider fly - wrap the thread and peacock from back to front in even turns. Once you’re a short distance from the eye, trap the peacock in place tightly with 2-3 turns of the black thread as shown. Leave a little gap here and don't crowd the head of the fly

STEP 6: Wrap the thread and peacock from back to front in even turns, like this. Once you’re a short distance from the eye, trap the peacock in place tightly with 2-3 turns of the black thread as shown. It’s important to leave a little gap here, because we don’t want to crowd the head of the fly (or it will be difficult to tie onto our leader).

making a black and peacock spider fly- trim off the peacock as tight as you can.

STEP 7: Trim off the peacock as tight as you can. If you’re new to fly-tying I can’t over-emphasise the need for a quality, sharp pair of scissors here! Don’t be a skinflint, because fine-tipped scissors are a fly-tyer’s best friend and make the job much easier.

making a black and peacock spider fly - Now take a black hen feather. Fibres that are 2-3 times the width of the hook gape look about right. Gently tease out the feather fibres and strip a little at the front with your thumb nail, so it’s easy to tie in

STEP 8: Now take a black hen feather. A small pack of feathers should tie several flies without breaking the bank. Choose a feather where the fibres or “spikes” are in proportion to the hook size. Fibres that are 2-3 times the width of the hook gape (the gap between the hook point and the shank above) look about right. Prepare it by gently teasing out the feather fibres and stripping a little at the front with your thumb nail, so it’s easy to tie in, as above.

making a black and peacock spider fly- tie in place as shown , with two or three nice tight turns of thread, just behind the eye.

STEP 9: Tie in place as shown, with two or three nice tight turns of thread, just behind the eye.

making a black and peacock spider fly - Holding the end of the feather, wrap it around in two neat, tight turns, so that the feather fibres splay out like the spokes of an umbrella. Hackle pliers make the job easier. Just make two wraps and trap the feather in place with another 2-3 turns of thread. Trim off the excess.

STEP 10: Now for the slightly trickier part. Holding the end of the feather, wrap it around in two neat, tight turns, so that the feather fibres splay out like the spokes of an umbrella. Hackle pliers (a tool which keep the feather pinched in place) can make the job easier if you’re struggling.
It’s tempting to make loads of wraps, but just make two before carefully trapping the feather in place with another 2-3 turns of thread! So often in fly tying, less is more because sparser materials move better and won’t crowd the fly. Once you’re happy, you can trim off the excess.

Easy_Flies_Black_&_Peacock_FINISHED_FLY

STEP 11: All that’s left to do is finish the fly. A whip finish tool is the tidiest way to do this – it’s not easily explained in words, so take a look at one an online tutorial, such as this one by Peter Gathercole. If you’re struggling, or don’t have the right tool, you could always just varnish, leave to dry and then carefully trim off with scissors (the fish won’t mind and we won’t tell anyone).

There we have it, job done! One of the easiest flies to tie for beginners, but also one that experienced anglers still swear by.

Further ideas and useful variations

black and peacock spider fly

Three useful variations.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

So, hopefully with a bit of practice, you’ll be tying these simple flies quickly and your efforts will get tidier. Don’t worry if your first few attempts are a bit messy – the fish don’t mind a great deal as this isn’t a super “fussy” or accurate fly. Whether you fish it gently, just letting it swing round in the breeze, or pull it like a loch style fly, it’s a great pattern.

Once you’ve cracked the basic tying, you might like to experiment with some simple variations. Try different models and sizes of hook. Small, fine hooks and sparse dressings can be useful for low, clear water and finicky feeders. Bigger brutes, on the other hand, are great for blustery days and aggressive fish. Of course, different weights and sizes of hook will also give you very different sink rates.

My favourite twists are:

  • Add a small bead (above left) for a faster sinking fly.
  • Tie a little sparser with a red tinsel rib and lighter hook (above middle), which works excellently for trout feeding in the upper layers.
  • Tie more boldly, with a red tag and perhaps a thicker body (above right) which is great for loch style fishing.

Above all, have fun and, I repeat, don’t worry if your early efforts are a bit unkempt. I guarantee you’ll still catch fish! Happy tying and keep an eye out for more patterns this summer. Next time, I’ll show you a simple but brilliant dry fly to tie yourself.

Read more from Dom Garnett

Regular Fishtec blogger Dom Garnett can also be caught every week in the Angling Times, while you can also find more on his site www.dgfishing.co.uk and the Angling Trust’s Lines on the Water blog.

Return to Still Water By Rene’ Harrop

For a trout fisherman, it would be difficult to picture a region with more choices of water than Yellowstone country. Flowing from its hub, which is the National park, are the Yellowstone, Snake, and Madison, and the Henry’s Fork lies just outside its boundaries. Smaller but no less attractive are the Fire Hole, Gallatin, and a host of diminutive spring creeks.

Hauling On Henry's

Hauling On Henry’s lake

Through the decades I have left boot prints on some of the world’s finest trout streams and my professional identity has been shaped mostly by moving water. But in recent years a different type of fishing has begun to challenge a dedication to the rivers and streams that have historically dominated my attention.

Because of elevation that rises well over a mile above sea level, the lakes and reservoirs that lie within convenient distance can remain ice-covered well into May. With most rivers open and spring hatches well underway, I do not suffer for lack of fishing opportunity but I confess to a sense of anticipation as the time draws near for a return to still water.

Sheridan Kamloops

Sheridan lake Kamloops trout

I’m not sure if the influence of my friend, Gareth Jones is a curse or a blessing, but it is certain that he is largely responsible for the distraction represented by Henry’s, Hebgen, and Sheridan Lakes. From this point forward, at least thirty percent of my fishing days will be occupied by the mysteries of still water, and this will end only when the lakes are again frozen over in late fall.

Following a master’s lead to considerable extent, a sizable portion of the flies tied in winter for my personal use are still water patterns, and I am excited to test the new ideas that come during the season of contemplation.

Why Still Water?

Why Still Water?

Though the mind state of fishing still water is in contrast to the more familiar mental requirement of fishing a river, it is no less satisfying or rewarding. I view my time on the lakes as a companion rather than competition to my loyalty to moving water and my life as a fisherman is made richer by having such a wide diversity of choice. How lucky can a man be?

Dom Garnett’s Top 6 Winter Flies

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A trout hooked on a ‘Satanic Buzzer fly’, so called because of the red flexible ‘horns’
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

As the days get shorter, some of us fish a good deal less. A shame, reckons Dom Garnett, because there’s excellent and varied sport to be had for those willing to brave the winter chill. Here are six of his favourite winter fly patterns to keep catching in the cold.

When it comes to the whole fishing year, you could probably separate most of us into two camps. There are those, like my father, who tend to stop when it’s cold. Some folks just don’t relish frosts or alternative targets. But then there are also those of us who truly love the winter and get genuinely excited by pike and grayling on the fly.

Of course, the arsenal of patterns can change quite drastically with winter fly fishing. Here are six of my most successful winter flies:

1. Micro Beaded Pink Shrimp (grayling, roach & dace)

TOP_6_MicroPinkShrimp

A Micro Beaded Pink Shrimp
Image courtesy of Dom Barnett

Hook: Turrall Barbless Grub (size 16-18)
Bead: Brass 2mm-3mm
Thread: Pink 8/0
Tail: Partridge fibres/ hint of flash material
Rib: Clear Mono
Shellback: Clear nymph skin or cut polythene strip
Body: Pink sparkle dubbing
Legs: Partridge fibres

This is a grayling classic, but also a fly I like to use for river roach and dace in smaller sizes. Don’t feel like you need to tie it big and OTT for grayling though. When rivers are clear and icy cold, a smaller fly can be more effective than a larger version – and will certainly spook fewer fish.

Tip: Rather than upping the size of your weighted bugs, try tungsten beads to achieve the sink rate you want. In clear or pressured waters, smaller flies can be vital.

2. Quill Buzzer

TOP_6_Quill_Buzzer

A Quill Buzzer
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

Hook: Turrall Grub Hook (size 10-14)
Thread: Black
Body: Stripped peacock herl
Cheeks: Yellow goose biots
Cover: Strand of UV Multiflash

Buzzers will hatch even in the winter across our smaller fisheries, and this one is always a convincing little pattern. However, I’m also including this on my list because it’s such a nice pattern to tie. If you buy it stripped, peacock quill is so easy to use and gives a cracking effect. Add a pinch of CDC to the head and use a lighter hook, and it’s also easy to make this fly into an emerger.

Tip: Learn to tie this fly on the Turrall Flies blog.

3. Satanic Buzzer (rainbow trout)

TOP_6_Satanic_Buzzer

A Satanic Buzzer
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

Hook: Buzzer or grub (size 10-16)
Thread: Black, with red for head and butt section
Rib: Fine silver wire (or UV tinsel)
Butt: Red thread
Body: Black thread
Horns: Two strands of red flexi-floss

This brilliant little pattern was shown to me by Scottish fly tyer Leon Guthrie, a fiendishly creative tyer of some truly wild patterns. This one is practical and deadly, crossing the best bits of a standard buzzer with those flexible bloodworm “horns” (hence the devilish name). It’s a real get-out-of-jail-free fly for rainbow trout on small waters.

For anyone curious about Leon, he was the subject of my “Fly Life on Mars” article, that features in my book Crooked Lines. Anything but conventional, he ties everything from tiny garden birds through to miniature aeroplanes, fried eggs and even a tiny Dyson vacuum cleaner (no kidding, it even has a little plug!).

Tip: For smaller flies, try using a fine pair of scissors to separate your flexifloss into finer strands. This fly is also terrific in a size 16 or even smaller if the fish are fussy.

4. Marabou Montana (rainbow trout)

TOP_6_Montana

A Marabou Montana
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

Hook: Longshank nymph, size 10-12
Bead: Brass 3mm
Thread: Black 6/0
Tail: Black marabou
Rib: Fine wire
Body: Black chenille
Thorax: Chartreuse fritz
Hackle: Black cock

The original Montana may have been a nymph, but this is more like a mini lure. I find a marabou tail is much more effective than the stiffer original. A gold bead also makes it much more practical to fish on a standard floating line.

Tip: Try retrieving this one a little slower with a picky figure of eight retrieve, rather than always stripping.

5. Kennick Killer (rainbow trout)

TOP_6_Kennick_killer

A Kennick Killer
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

Hook: Longshank lure (size 10)
Bead: 2.5mm brass bead
Thread: Red 6/0
Tail: Olive and Sunburst marabou, with hint of Krystal Flash
Body: Trimmed down UV Killer Fritz (olive)
Head: Tapered thread, well varnished

This is such a brilliant pattern – often the one I will give a complete beginner to fish – it’s that reliable. It originated on Kennick Reservoir, near my home in Devon, but is equally deadly on smaller winter waters. You can creep it or strip it; in fact it’s quite hard to fish wrong! Whether the key is in the two tone body or the addition of UV reflective materials I can’t say, but it’s a brilliant fly.

Tip: If you see a fish following your lure, don’t slow down or stop. By speeding up you are usually more likely to provoke a reaction!

6. Savage’s Baitfish (pike)

TOP_6_Savages_Baitfish

A Savage’s Baitfish
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

Hook: Turrall Pike (2/0 – 4/0)
Thread: Kevlar
Body: Savage Hair in at least 2 colours, with UV tinsel mixed in
Cheeks: Jungle cock or pinch of hot orange synthetic fibres (optional)
Eyes: 8-12mm 3D eyes, held with epoxy resin or UV cure glue

I tie and fish with stacks of different pike flies through the cooler months. This is probably still my go-to design though, just because it’s so versatile and hassle free. You can tie these in any hue you like, but I always think two colours are better than one and I’m never without a good pinch of UV tinsel.

The original is the work of Rutland warden Nigel Savage, who has also caught zander on these using fast sinking lines. Tying the head part-way down the shank (third to half way down) helps avoid the body fibres tangling round the hook bend on the cast.

My favourite colour combos for this fly include yellow and white, pink and white and black and silver. The version pictured is a perch though, using white, yellow and green hair, and given some stripes with a Sharpie marker or laundry pen.

Tip: Never be too quick to lift a pike fly out of the water at the end of the cast. Count to three slowly at the end of each retrieve, just to make sure there isn’t a pike following.

TOP_6_WINTER_FLIES - 1

An icy day on Simpson Valley, one of my favourite winter fly fisheries in Devon

Further Tips and Fishing Tales from our blogger…

Dominic Garnett is a West Country based fishing guide and author of several books including Amazon bestseller Flyfishing for Coarse Fish and the acclaimed collection of fishing tales Crooked Lines. He also designs flies for Devon based company Turrall. You can read more from him at www.dgfishing.co.uk and http://www.turrall.com/blog

Last but not least, if you enjoy fly fishing through the whole year, you might also enjoy Dom’s YouTube film featuring action from Bratton Water, North Devon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KJPi8CYIM4

An Emerger For All Seasons – by Steffan Jones

Large Brook Duns are a big meal and one that any self-respecting trout would reluctantly refuse, as each morsel provides substantial sustenance.

The Large brook dun

The Large brook dun.

As a rule, they do not hatch in the middle of the river and you are more likely to find them in greater numbers closer to the bank or in back eddys. Should you have a current deflection from a stone however, then this will often push the duns out into the stream and towards the trout. The trout will often locate themselves around such deflections, becoming known as likely ambush points and strong feeding lanes. The brook duns will also bring up the wiliest of trout that often hide underneath banks or bankside vegetation, as the trickle of duns may be strongest and most concentrated in such areas; always pay attention for small, unenergetic rises as they are often the largest fish.

The duns often try and scurry across the water’s surface towards the bank after hatching, often climbing up onto rocks after doing so. As such, the adults themselves can be a problematic food source to hone onto for the trout, as they escape before interception. This makes the emergers or cripples a securer meal and a better food source, often favoured as a result.

Signs of Brook dun emergance

Signs of Brook dun emergence.

No need to get complicated with a pattern to cover such eventualities. Indeed, the same pattern dressed in different sizes will cover a myriad of different olives and will see you right throughout most of the season. The important of the pattern to me is that is signals to the trout ‘eat me; I’m not going anywhere’. If they invest energy into intercepting an object they want to be rewarded as a result, so don’t make them question the investment in the first place in order to maximise your chances of interception.

No need to get complicated

No need to get complicated.

For this, I prefer to fish my emergers with the buoyancy placed out the front of the fly; fished over and beyond the eye, rather than up and over the body. This allows more of the fly to be fished in and under the surface, with only part of the thorax and ‘wing’ fished on and over the surface. I understand and appreciate that this does not follow the natural, as the wings to not emerge first nor do they protrude forward. However, outside of this observation I have not found the trout to question this unorthodox style and I believe the benefits outweigh such semantics.

An emerger for all seasons

An emerger for all seasons.

Tying instructions/ingredients

Hook: Partridge K12ST for the large patterns as it’s a longer hook, then Partridge K14A for the smaller patterns

Thread: Veevus olive (C12) in 12/0

Tail: Coq de leon; don’t go crazy, 6-8 fibres will be ample. Take the thread behind the tail once to help prop and elevate it slightly, preventing the tail from getting wrapped and hindered on the hook bend.

Body: Stripped peacock quill; colour to suit. Golden olive here. Or, try the Magic Quills, which are transparent, adjusting the colour of the base thread accordingly. UV resin over to help protect the fragile quill.

Body2: Between the quill and the thorax place two turns of oval mirage tinsel. UV resin over this too, to protect the tinsel from the trout’s teeth. I believe this tinsel provides a little strike point, but also emulates the air pocket created during the emerging sequence of the natural. It is worth, however, dressing a few without this, just in case you find  some particularly picky fish.

Thorax: Fox squirrel; this can be thick to dub. Chop the fibres a couple of times to shorten the fibre length then dub onto the thread after adding some tacky wax to aid the process.

Wing: x3 plumes of natural CDC (adjust amount and plume size according to hook size). Pulled over the thorax and tied shuttlecock style. Make sure to dress a thread base between the eye and the plumes at the head, to help prop and elevate the plumes somewhat, which, in turn, helps counterbalance the fly and force the body subsurface. Also, when drawing the cdc over the thorax do so by drawing from the tips; this will allow a few loose fibres to escape and trail back over the body of the fly.

A victim of the Steffan Jones emerger

A victim of the Steffan Jones emerger.

Steffan has been guiding at home and abroad for well over twenty seasons now. If you would like to arrange a guided trip please visit www.anglingworldwide.com for more details.