To Infinity And Beyond – Simon Crow On Carp Fishing Gadgets!

There are lots of gadgets in carp fishing today which divide opinion, but I’m one of those anglers who embraces change, making use of the latest products if I think they are going to help me catch a few more fish.

I’m a short session angler whose time is very precious so I don’t see the point in making hard work of something if there’s a new tool which will make life easier.

Bite alarms

Bite alarm

It might seem hard to believe, but many years ago bite indicators were frowned upon by lots of anglers

When I was a lad I remember the older guys looking at my bite alarms and giving them a right slating. Now buzzers are viewed as an essential part of the carper’s kit, and there are upwards of a dozen companies making more than one model each.

Bite alarms now range from the very basic type which clip onto the line, to ones which operate with digital technology. We can now get different coloured LEDs on our alarms, vibration modes to assist deaf anglers, high and low pitch tones, as well as remote boxes which sound when we’re several yards away.

Bait boats

Bait boat

Bait boats aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, but they will certainly help you catch more fish

If I had a pound for every time I’ve heard someone slag off bait boats, I’d be a rich man. One of the best excuses I hear from the moaners is that anglers use them to put baits in unsafe areas. Well the same could be said about line in trees and carp towing cracked off rigs because someone has just gone for the ‘big chuck’!

Who’s right and who’s wrong? My advice is to embrace them both. Casting allows us to use our judgement to ‘feel down’ a lead to the lake bed, while bait boating gets rigs quietly into position without excessive casting.

Echo sounders

Echo sounder

Echo sounders are brilliant for checking the depth but not so good at finding the fish

Echo sounders get a bit of stick because, apparently, they take away the skill of watercraft. I know where the detractors are coming from with this one because the day we’re told where our target fish is swimming is the day we become trappers not anglers.

But today’s echo sounders aren’t even very good at deciphering whether an echo is a snag or a fish, let alone capable of picking out individual carp, so we’re a long way off them being a substitute for traditional watercraft skills.

I use echo sounders for depth finding and looking for clear spots, mainly because they reduce the amount of casting (aka carp spooking) needed. They’re also great when I’m on a big water where boats are allowed and even the best casters in the world won’t get beyond the margins.

Underwater cameras

Underwater camera

Life below the marker float, what a great way of checking your baited spot

This moves me onto the underwater camera, a piece of kit which is fast becoming a common sight at venues where the water is nice and clear. You can attach them to bait boats or normal boats and even floats like FishSpy which then send the image back to your smartphone.

Using them for finding fish is a hassle, so their main advantage lies in helping you check out the bottom, especially once you’ve cast out and want to know that your hookbait is sitting right.

I really rate the cameras on floats although their cost needs to come down a bit before they turn into ‘must have’ items. Just the thought of cracking off with £150 on the end is enough to stop many an angler from becoming a convert. (Editors note: FishSpy underwater camera’s are now £129.95)

Droning on

drone

A bird’s-eye view without climbing a tree
Image: Shutterstock

Last but not least we come to the latest craze – drones. Yes folks, believe it or not, carp anglers are starting to use drones with cameras to help them find fish, as well as to identify features. Climbing trees to get a good view is a thing of the past as nothing quite compares to getting a proper bird’s-eye view.

You can even leave your drone hovering in the air while you cast out, keeping an eye on your phone screen to check that the cast has landed ‘spot on’. A decent drone with a camera and smartphone app will cost about £500 and believe me it’s worth every penny, unless that is, you end up dumping it in the lake when the connection cuts out!

So there you have it, a look at a few of the latest carpy gadgets on the market. You can take or leave them – fishing will always be a sport which leaves the choice entirely up to you.

Simon Crow

Thank you to Simon Crow for permission to use these images.

Introducing Hodgman Fly Fishing Products

Fishtec are pleased to announce we are stocking Hodgman fly fishing products for the 2017 season.

Hodgman are an American firm that have been producing premium fly fishing gear since 1838; renowned for their fly fishing clothing, breathable waders and innovative wading boot design, Hodgman offer first class fly fishing gear.

New to the UK for spring 2017, Fishtec have cherry picked a full range of Hodgman products that we feel offer tremendous value for money, with superior quality that only an American brand can offer.

What makes Hodgman garments so special in our opinion is attention to detail. Every product has been carefully thought out with the fly fisherman in mind. Packed full of features, we are sure this brand is going to be a major hit in the UK alongside the likes of Simms and Patagonia. Hodgman equipment isn’t low budget orientated, it’s quality. You really do get what you pay for when you invest in Hodgman equipment and their stuff is clearly built to last.

The following videos are a ”must watch” – our key Hodgman products are explained in detail!

Hodgman product videos:

Hodgman H5 Stocking Foot Wader

Hodgman Aesis Sonic Stocking Foot Wader

Hodgman Aesis Sonic Zip Front Stocking Foot Waders

Hodgman Core INS Wader Liner

Hodgman H-Lock Interchangeable Sole Wading Boots

Hodgman Aesis Shell Fly Fishing Jacket

Hodgman Aesis 3-In-1 Jacket

Hodgman Aesis Sonic Wadelite Jacket

Hodgman Aesis Hyperdry Down Jacket

Hodgman Aesis Softshell Fleece Jacket

The full range of Hodgman fly fishing equipment can be found here.

“Marmite” Fishing Tackle

marmite

Dividing opinion. What’s your “marmite” fishing tackle?
Image source: David Hunt

For every angler who loves having the latest kit, another will be busy shaking their head at it. Fishing tackle innovations are seldom embraced equally by everyone in the angling community. Dominic Garnett takes us on a quick tour of the fishing gear that divides opinion  – the “Marmite” of the fishing tackle world.

The Bite Alarm

Bite-alarm

Bite alarms – Love or hate?

Many years after their widespread adoption by anglers, these little boxes of joy (or disturbance) continue to provoke debate.

It was none other than the great Richard Walker who invented the electronic bite alarm. The idea wasn’t to promote “lazy” fishing though, but to detect runs at night. 

Have we become hooked on them? Many specimen hunters wouldn’t be without theirs and sadly, not everyone seems to know where the volume control is.

Centrepin Reels

centrepin-reel

Is old-school best or should the centrepin reel be consigned to history?

Old-school romantics love them and in the hands of a master, a centrepin reel can be poetry in motion. But for the less skilled, not so silky smooth; we’re talking long trotting or a tangle every five minutes!

Fish Finders

Fish-finder

Fish finder – the ultimate cheat?

Struggling to get a bite? Worse, have you no idea where the fish even are? A fish finder could be the answer. On large waters, a lot of us use them to help us identify features we can’t otherwise see.

But more and more anglers are also using fish finders on rivers and lakes where they’re much quicker than traditional methods for plumbing the depth. But is using a fish finder to locate your prey a clever tactic or does it show a lack of watercraft? After all, just because you know where the fish are, doesn’t mean you’ll be able to persuade them to bite.

The Bait Boat

Bait-boat

Are you a bait boater or do bait boats give you a sinking feeling?

Faced with long distances and awkward casts, some clever so-and-so wondered if he might use a radio-controlled boat to place his bait and rigs to the exact inch. A few years later we have high-tech devices and a debate that just won’t lie down. Are bait boats genius or cheating?

Dropshot Gear

Drop-shot-gear

Drop shot gear – best thing since sliced bread or pastime for the brain dead?

Who saw the whole dropshot trend coming? In the past three years or so it’s become all the rage. But are you a convert or just plain confused? The technique does take some getting used to, that’s for sure. It takes a lot more patience than standard lure fishing, nor is acute concentration and vertical jigging for small perch everyone’s cup of tea.

Underwater Fishing Cameras

Fishing-camera

Fishing cameras: innovation or intrusion?

What exactly goes on under the water while you fish? Not content with centuries of crackpot theories, some clever clogs decided to cast out a little film camera to take away the guesswork.

Unlike many of angling’s more high-tech trends, the British did it first with the FishSpy camera, a product purely designed for carp anglers. But is this understanding the water better, or killing any remaining mystery?  

Split Cane Rods

Split-cane-rod

Split cane: old-world charm or obsolete?

“Simply wonderful,” the traditional angler sighs. “Look at that old-world craftsmanship; lovely to play a fish on too.” But split cane rods are also pretty heavy and slow-actioned.

Where you stand on vintage tackle is a very personal thing and while split cane certainly has its romance, would you really favour it over carbon? Is it a joy to use, or more akin to replacing your new car with a horse and cart?

Further Information

What’s your take on “Marmite” tackle? Tell us what fishing equipment you love or loath via Twitter and use #MarmiteTackle

For more talking points on a weekly basis, check out Dominic Garnett’s column “The Far Bank” in the Angling Times, or discover his books and regular blog at www.dgfishing.co.uk

Float Tube Fishing

Float tubes can open a whole world to the fisherman, whether you are a flyfisher or a predator specialist. In this blog we take a look at the world of float tubing and the advantages they can bring to your fishing.

Float tube fishing - a great way to fish!!

Float tube fishing – a fun way to fish!!

What are they?

A float tube (aka belly boat) is an inflatable fishing craft originally based on a tractor tyre inner tube. These early ‘donut’ designs have long been replaced with much better U or V shaped hulls designed to cut through the water efficiently. Float tubes typically have an integrated seat and a bar across the lap with a mesh tray designed to keep you from slipping out.

You propel yourself about the lake by using a pair of fins attached to your fishing waders. These fins are much like those used by scuba divers, although specialist types are available. The paddling motion required is very much like cycling a bike – but backwards.

float tube with fins

Float tube, fins and life jacket – the essentials!

Are they safe?

Float tubes in our opinion are even safer than a boat. They feature multiple inflation bladders and a thick cordura covered hull; which when taunt is very resistant to punctures. Once inside the tube it is almost impossible to flip yourself out or go into the water.

There are however a few common sense safety concerns to address:

  • Ensure the tube is fully inflated and the valves securely tightened.
  • Never walk to the water with the flippers on, put them on at the edge.
  • Enter the water slowly backwards so you do not trip over head first.
  • Choose a gently sloping bank to access the water.
  • Wear an inflatable life jacket as a back up.
  • Wear warm waders – e.g neoprene, or a thermal undersuit even on summer days.
  • Be aware of sharp objects including your own hooks.
  • Stick to stillwater – never tube in a flowing river or the sea.

Float tube techniques – the advantages they bring.

Float tubes allow complete freedom of movement, giving you a huge advantage if a boat is not available on the venue. They allow you a silent, stealthy approach – for whatever reason fish simply do not fear float tubes like they do a boat or wading angler. This allows you to get very close to them and  fish shoreline shallows where bank angling would instantly spook fish. As well as conventional casting, float tubes allow you to troll your flies or lures allowing you to cover a vast area easily.

A wild brown trout caught on a float tube.

A wild brown trout caught on a float tube.

Float tubes are most popular for fly fishing for trout –  a 10 foot long fly rod will help keep the line off the surface on the back cast. A floating line is the best option, a short headed 6 or 7 weight is ideal. Although for trolling with flies a full sinking line like an Airflo Di5 or Di7 will really come in handy.

Float tubes are also becoming ever more popular with the pike and predator community, for pike fly fishing or lure fishing with spinning rods. Float tubes can give you access to areas pike love that are often inaccessible from the bank – for example outside edges of weedbeds, off thick reed banks and on drop offs where treading water allows you to hover in position, and present your lures effectively.

A pike caught from a float tube

A pike caught from a float tube.

Where can I use one?

It would be great if you could use one anywhere, but you should always check fishery rules before you launch one. Generally natural venues such as the Lochs of Scotland, Pike loughs in Ireland and the Welsh mountain lakes are places where you can freely use a tube. For stocked trout fisheries the BFTA (British Float Tube Association) has a great list of float tube venues on their website. For predator anglers wherever you can use a kayak or launch your own boat to fish it should be a safe bet.

It’s great fun!!

Above all, the main draw with a float tube is the enjoyment factor. Nothing beats being out on the lake, fishing from what is essentially a comfortable armchair but with free mobility. For those who try, there is simply no looking back. So get out there and tube!

Fishtec stock the Ron Thompson Max float tube and also matching float tube fins. A great combination to help get you started on float tubing – available for just £164.98.

The HD Sports Action Camera on test

Capture the action for a fraction of the price of a GoPro! The new HD sports Action camera is ideal for capturing fishing footage. Available for just £34.99 it really is a bargain.

Perfect for fly, coarse and carp angling this HD action camera can be used to get underwater and action fishing shots.

The HD Action camera is £34.99 - complete with all the extras shown here.

The HD Action camera is £34.99 – complete with all the extras shown here.

The HD action camera is supplied complete with a waterproof housing case, as well as a variety of mounts and accessories. There is also a comprehensive additional accessory pack available for just £19.99 – this includes a head strap and chest harness, ideal add-ons for active fly and lure fishing situations. All mounts and accessories use the same universal system you will find on a GoPro.

The camera has a 120 degree wide angle lens, just like a GoPro. It records video in 1080p, 720p and 480p. 720p and 480p are recorded in 30 frames per second, and 1080p at 25 frames per second. It has a full LCD screen at the back, so you can review your footage right there on the bank. To get the footage, it’s a simple case of plugging it into a computer and dragging the files off it.

To see whether it was any good, we decided to take the camera fishing on a foggy, dull December day on a grayling river in South Wales.

The camera was set to 720p, the best compromise for frame speed, quality and storage room. A 8 GB micro SD card was inserted (not included) – this will give about 40 minutes of footage at 720p. The camera was very intuitive to use – no fiddling about, and easy to turn on/off even with cold, wet hands.

Firstly, after finding a few fish we did some close up under water fish shots, which you can see below. To film these, the camera was simply held in the hand with no attachment used.

As you can see, the footage is decent even in poor light conditions.

Moving on, a large shoal of grayling was located allowing filming of fish captures using a fly rod. The chest harness supplied with the accessories pack was fitted, to give point of view action footage.

This part of the river was surrounded by sunken banks, with a tree canopy overhead. With the sun going down as well it was quite dark and dismal. Despite this the camera picked up some great footage – proving the camera works well in low light conditions.

We will update this review with some more footage from a brighter day soon.

We are sure these cameras will be popular with our customers and become a best seller – after all, they are just £34.99! You can buy the HD action camera and accessories here.

5 Great Wader Repair Tips

Waders are a valuable bit of your fishing tackle arsenal, but like all good things they always come to an end – usually on a barb wire fence or bramble patch.

All is not lost however – should your waders develop a leak (let’s face it they ALL do!) there are some wader repair tips you can use to save them. Our 5 wader repair tips explain how.

Leaking waders ready for a repair!

Leaking waders ready for a repair!

1. The torch

Turn your waders inside out. Get hold of a very bright torch, then find a dark room (darker the better!) Shine the torch inside, close up to the material. Look for pin holes – they usually show up as a small, brighter white spot. Mark them with a pen or chalk as you find them. Repair with a blob of wader glue. This method can work well, especially if you are patient and thorough with your inspection.

Remember after using your wader glue put it in the freezer for next time – this will stop it setting, and all you need do is heat in a cup of warm water before you use again.

2. Fill with water

This ‘old school’ method involves finding a safe spot to hang your waders, and fill with water using the garden hose. Look for drips and damp spots to locate the leaks, mark with chalk as you find them. You can then repair once dry. Be aware water testing can place strain on seams.

3. Air pressure testing

The idea is to inflate your waders as tightly as possible, and them immerse the leaking area in a large tub of water while still under pressure and look for bubbles. You can also ladle wader on the areas you suspect of leaking and look for bubbles as you apply the water. Mark the suspect areas with chalk or pen, allow to dry then apply glue.

To get air into your waders under high pressure, a bouncy castle blower is just perfect. Another way is to find a vacuum cleaner you can set in reverse or use a leaf blower. Air pressure testing is best done as a two man job – get somebody to keep the wader top firmly closed and keep the pressure up while you test.

Some wader repair essentials

Some wader repair essentials.

4. Alcohol spray

This method is very effective on Simms Gore-tex waders. Turn inside out, spray with Block-it wader repair or isopropyl alcohol mix. Gore-tex reacts to the alcohol, and black spots appear. Then, as the alcohol dries daub some wader glue on the dark spots. This test also works for non Gore-tex breathables to some extent. Have the wader inside out, spray the suspect area, then quickly turn the wader back the right way. Dark spots should then be visible on the outer shell of the wader where it seeps through the holes.

We have heard it said WD40 can be spayed on the inside of all kinds of breathable waders, and because it penetrates the fabric pinholes will show up. However WD40 is very greasy, smells, and is hard to remove after the test. But if you don’t mind that, it could work.

An alcohol spray test revealed pin holes in a very awkward place!

An alcohol spray test revealed pin holes in a very awkward place!

5. Professional repair

Lets face it even the best DIY job can still miss leaks, or in the case of seam leaks be very hard to fix. Sometimes it is simply easier and less time consuming to get the waders repaired for you by an expert.

Simms offer a ‘lifetime’ warranty/repair service where you can return your Simms wader for assessment, with wader repairs done for free if considered warranty or charged if not.

We recommend the services of the UK’s leading wader repair specialist, Dave Gordon aka Diver Dave. We can 100% vouch for Diver Dave’s service and effectiveness – this gentleman can work his magic on even the most ancient, leaky pair of waders, and for a very reasonable fee too!  So, if you think your waders are ”written off” – think again, and drop Dave an email.

Remember looking after your waders can help prevent them leaking in the first place! Read our 5 wader care tips here.

Fishing Tackle Review – The RidgeMonkey Bivvy Light

 

The RidgeMonkey duo bivvy-lite

The RidgeMonkey duo bivvy-lite.

I have had my RidgeMonkey bivvy lite Duo for over 5 months and used it most nights when out fishing. I don’t use it to read by or keep it on for hours, just to bait up and do a spot of cooking.

This clever bit of kit has two light settings. I tend to use the brightest setting, not the red, as I am not sure about that one yet. I have been fishing at least one night a week, if not more and used this light most nights.

There are two light settings.

There are two light settings.

The battery power has proved to be wonderful – I have still yet to charge it up! This is just brilliant and the fact that it would be quite a simple process, as I carry a power pack for my phone. So when I finally have to charge up the light, I will be able to do it on the bank.

Attach anywhere you wish using a magnetic strip.

Attach anywhere you wish using a magnetic strip.

It has a  handy magnetic strip you can attach it to your bivvy or brolly

There are two cords either end which enable you to hang it from brolly spokes or a magnet hook.

I have attached a clip to mine which makes it a bit easier for me to attach.
This allows me to clip it on quick over the brolly spoke and I can just slide it up and down depending on where I need the light to be under the brolly.

I have also found a use for those old pva tubes! A perfect place to store the bivvy Light when not in use.

This is a great bit of kit and I believe I have finally found a bivvy light that is simply perfect for the job. Full credit to RidgeMonkey for doing a great job here – carp anglers have been waiting for something as good as this for a long time!

Regards Richard.

Weird and wonderful fishing: The bizarre ways anglers make their catches!

bizarre fishing

Image source: shutterstock
Waiting for a bite?

When was the last time you challenged your tried and trusted angling techniques? Here to inspire you, we’ve put together some of the weird and wonderful ways fishermen around the world catch their fish! A collection of the the mad, the bad and the ludicrously dangerous

You wouldn’t necessarily want to try any of these methods at home.

Sewer fishing

Bait a hook with a chunk of hotdog sausage, poke it down a hole in the storm sewer cover and wait. That’s what this American lad did. Would you eat a fish caught in a drain? This is an ingenious fishing method that brings new meaning to the term, “foul hooked”.

Video: The Fish Whisperer

Drilling for fish

We promise we’re not winding you up with this clip which shows just how inventive anglers can be. A battery powered drill replaces a traditional rod and reel, and takes all the effort out of bringing in the catch. Sounds to us like it also takes all the fun out of it.

Video: The Fish Whisperer

Use the family linen

Here’s a traditional Middle Eastern way of catching bait fish. All you need is a friend, a headscarf, a stream or shallow pond and some slight of hand to help you sieve out your quarry. Probably best to avoid trying this with the family tablecloth, though!

Video: niceman69100

Current fishing methods

Here, a group of sparky Australian biologists whose fishing technique is literally electrifying. The fish are briefly stunned for the purpose of environmental monitoring.The UK Environment Agency uses the same method to track the fish populations in our rivers over time.

Video: Tim Young

A handy way to make a catch

No rod? No worries! These fisherman in Guyana don’t let a lack of fishing tackle stop them. They get into the water fully clothed and chase the Tarpon that swim nearby, using their bare hands to make their catch. No mean feat considering some of these fish can weigh anything up to 280lbs.

Video: LuckiRam

Strictly cod dancing

If it’s too cold to stand around – dance! Not only will it you warm up, you’re likely to make a speedy catch too. Here, anglers leap about on the edge of the ice bordering a river. The fish respond to the thumping of the anglers’ boots which agitates the water beneath, literally leaping into the net! Ice cool or what?

Video: JefferyRPeoples3

Cormorant and get it

Feeling peckish? Using birds to catch fish is a technique that goes back a thousand years in the Far East. An ingenious fishing technique – is this a case of man and nature working in harmony or humans exploiting the hell out of a flock of birds? We’ll let you decide.

Video: Hans A. Leupe 

What weird and wonderful fishing techniques do you have to share? We’d love to hear from you! Tell us all about it on our Facebook page!

The angler’s guide to sharing FishSpy video

FishSpy - see what you're missing!

FishSpy – see what you’re missing!

The FishSpy camera is capturing the attention of anglers out there, and many of you are using it to help make better catches. Did you know how easy it was to edit and share the videos you take?

Here’s the lowdown on exactly how to do it, and we’ve got plenty of hints and tips to help you on your way.

To give you an example of what you can do with the FishSpy footage and VideoPad Editor (we’ll show you how to use that), here’s a video made from raw footage supplied by our FishSpy testers. Enjoy, and then learn how to do it yourself!

Transferring footage

fishspy connectivity

Fishspy is made for connectivity

Taken some great footage, but unsure how to show the world? If you can upload photos from your digital camera, you’ll be able to do the same with your FishSpy footage.
Take the flight off the FishSpy, and find the USB port

fishspy connected

Plug in, and you’re good to go

Plug your FishSpy into your computer with a USB cable. It’ll show up in your file explorer, where you can navigate to the FishSpy files. The footage can then be dragged, dropped and saved to your machine.

finding fishspy

Finding the FishSpy

fishspy files

All your favourite FishSpy moments

The FishSpy Manual also shows you how to get rid of any film you don’t want:

‘Delete footage from FishSpy using your computer or using Wi-Fi by pressing the X button’

Basic Editing

Want to edit a short section from a longer piece of footage? VideoPad Editor by NCH is free to download and easy to use. It’s compatible with Windows and Apple machines, and their ‘how-to’ guides on YouTube are incredibly helpful.

To upload and edit in VideoPad, click ‘add media file’ icon on the toolbar. This will open up your files. Browse to find your clip, select and click ‘Open’. This drops it into the Media List.

Importing files

Cutting out duller stretches of recording between more interesting snippets is easy. VideoPad lets you set ‘in and out points’ in your film. Select your video clip in the media list so it appears in the clip preview window.

Play the file and drag your cursor to the point you want to start, and click the red flag. This will set the ‘in point’. Mark the ‘out point’ by dragging the cursor to where you want the film to end and click the blue flag. This will set the end of the clip. To set it you click the green arrow.

Setting in and out points

If you’re not content with shorter clips, try compiling all your best moments from different trips into one blockbuster ‘Cream of the Carp’ movie.

Adding transitions to your film

Give your film a professional touch by adding in transition sequences. Transitions are smooth ways to move between clips. Fade to black, crossfading between clips and sharp cuts can give your film a more polished look. Select the film clips you want to move between and click the ‘Transitions’ tab on the toolbar. You’ll see a number of different effects to experiment with. Once you’ve found one you like, select it and add a duration time. About one second is usually plenty.

Adding text to your movie

Add interesting titles or snappy comments to your film by using the text editor. Use the ‘Overlay’ tab on the left hand side toolbar. Type your text into the ‘Add overlay text or image’ box. The text is added at the ‘in point’ on the film clip. You can move this to feature in a different place by simply clicking and dragging the little box and dropping it in the position you’d like.

Saving and exporting your film

It’s easy to save your film as a work in progress. Select ‘File menu’ and ‘Save file project as’. Give it a name, and choose a location on your PC to save it to. Files from VideoPad are always saved as .vpj files, but you can choose to save as .avi which is a better format for sharing on social media,.

Once it’s finished, export it! Find the ‘Save movie’ button at the top of the screen. There are a few options for saving your movie. Save to a disc or to your computer first. Then you can choose to save the film in a format that will be easy to send to YouTube or to your portable device such as an iPhone or other smartphone. Select which option you want to use, give each file a name, and then hit ‘OK’.

Social media sharing

Now your FishSpy film is looking great, what better way to show off your skills than to share it with your angling buddies on social media? Here’s how!

Uploading to YouTube:

Log in to YouTube and use the Upload tab in the top right hand corner. Drag and drop your exported movie into the box, or search your PC for the right file. Click the file and choose ‘Open’, and it will send it to YouTube.

You have options to personalize the film, so give it a title, add tags and a description. It can take a little time to upload the film, but when it’s finished and you’ve edited the boxes, click ‘Done’ and it will appear.

Uploading to Facebook:

Uploading directly to Facebook is a great way of achieving wider views and shares of your film than if you simply link to the YouTube video you created.

On your Facebook profile page, go to the status update box. Find the camera icon in the ‘What have you been up to?’ section. It will open up your PC files and you can select and add your film clip.

Depending on the size of your file, upload time varies, but you’ll get a notification to let you know when it’s complete. Add in a snappy or catchy title for your film, and let all your friends know where to find it online.

Sharing more privately

If you prefer to share your film clips with just a few select angling buddies, then why not try applications like Dropbox or Google Drive? You need to sign up for an account to use them, but it’s very quick and easy to do and it gives you more control over who you allow to see your videos

Using Dropbox to share files:

One great advantage of using Dropbox is that it allows you to find uploaded files on any computer, anywhere, any time! Use the ‘upload’ tab, select and it will ask you to ‘Choose files’. This will open your file explorer and you can select the FishSpy footage you want to send. Click ‘Open’. You have the option to add more than one file. Once you get a green tick on the right hand side of the upload box, you know your files are uploaded. Click ‘done’ and your file appears in your Dropbox folder.

To share your film, go to your Dropbox folder and search for the file you’ve uploaded, click the link and it will turn light blue. At the top of the screen is a tab labelled ‘Share link’. Type in the email of the person you want to share it with and hit send.

Using Google drive to share files:

Head to the Google home page and click the ‘sign in’ button at the top right hand corner. Log in, and find the apps tab in the top right hand corner. This will show you your Google Drive page. Select ‘New’, and then ‘File Upload’.

Choose your FishSpy clip and select ‘Open’, and it will add it to your Drive. To share, right click the file, add in the email(s) of the people you want to send it to. Then simply choose ‘Shareable link’ and ‘Done’. Easy!

Sending files to friends

wetransfer

Wetransfer’s easy, quick form

Another great way to share your films with friends is to just send it to them! Wetransfer is a service which provides a really easy, free way to do that. Using their simple form, just upload your clip an enter their email address and your own. Include an optional message, hit ‘Transfer’. It’s that simple – they’ll get an email with a link to download the file. No logging in, no account to set up, nothing. You can even choose to send the link via Facebook if you sign up to a premium account!

Now you’ve seen just how easy it is to record and share your footage from FishSpy, why not have a go yourself and show us your results? We’d love to see what you can come up with, so share away on our Facebook page!

Tackle up for Early Season River Fly Fishing

The 2016 river trout fishing season is soon to be upon us! Here in Wales it begins on March the 3rd, with the rest of the country soon to follow suit. We simply cannot wait to get out on our local rivers and start fishing again.

But first make sure you tackle up! For your larger freestone river fishing, you need the appropriate fly fishing gear in order to make the most of harsh early spring conditions. Here we have picked out six essential tackle items for your early season trout fishing forays, and explain why you need them.

An Early season wild brown from the river Ebbw.

An Early season wild brown from the river Ebbw.

1. Thermal underwear suit. In early March the water temperatures will still be extremely cold, and wading for more than an hour or two will leave you chilled to the bone. We recommend Investing in a decent set of thermals for the start of your season.

The new thermolite body suit from Airflo is absolutely perfect for the job. Worn as part of a layering system this body suit is guaranteed to keep you warm and comfortable. Another benefit is getting your waders on and off. This becomes a much easier job due to this suits smooth, soft, friction free surface. Simply ensure you wear in the correct way (i.e over your other clothing) and you will reap the benefits.

Airflo's thermolite suit.

Airflo’s thermolite suit.

2. Get a decent net. There several excellent nets on the market designed purposely for the river angler, such as the Airflo streamtec pan net. At a sale price of just £14.99 these nets are a true bargain – so why not invest in a new one for your seasons start?

These great nets are very lightweight, with an a ergonomic rubber handle and are sized ‘just right’. There is nothing worse than struggling to unhook a fish twisted up in overly deep net meshing, and the depth here is just perfect. The mesh itself is extremely fine, just like that of a coarse fishing match net head, making them extremely fish friendly and a lot harder to end up with your your fly entangled within it. Attach with a magnetic net-release to the D-ring on your vest and you are good to go!

Wild Trout in Airflo pan net

A 14 inch wild river Taff brown – Safe and sound in the Airflo Streamtec pan net.

3. Waterproof phone case. At the start of the season river flows will be very strong from the constant winter rain, so a careless wade could easily result in a dip. To save you getting a new phone, we recommend you invest in an overboard phone case.

These cases really are an indispensable piece of kit for the river angler – I’m sure plenty of us have ruined a phone whilst river fishing, we certainly have!

Overboard phone cases

Overboard phone cases – how much is your phone worth?

Wear securely round your neck, or in your wader pocket safe in the knowledge if you do ship some water or stumble on the rocks your phone will be saved. Unlike a lot of cheap ebay imitations (which often split apart after just days!) the overboard cases are designed for ease of entry and are very durable – guaranteed to keep your phone safe and dry for many years.

4. Warm headgear. It’s a well known fact that body heat is lost most rapidly through the head. We stock a wide section of warm head gear, but our favourite has to be the Simms trout visor beanie. A great bit of kit which unlike some others has a visor peak so is ideal for blocking out low angle light glare.

Simms trout visor beanie in action

The Simms trout visor beanie in action.
Image: Simms Fly Fishing

5.Thermolite hoody. These awesome jackets by Airflo have got it all – functionality, smart appearance, and cold weather performance to match. These jackets are simply great value, and are a firm staff favourite at Fishtec. Ideal for early season on the river, and the pub afterwards.

warm gear East sleep fish

Warm Gear: Airflo Thermolite hoody with polar Buff.
Image: Eat Sleep fish

6. Polar Buff neck wear. Keeps wind and cold out of the neck and face area. An essential for early season angling. The polar version features a continuous double layer of polyester microfibre and fleece, making ideal for autumn and winter fishing escapades. Wear it with the fleece inside or out to keep warmth and comfort to a maximum. The possibilities are almost endless, rather like the product!

Why not let us know how you got on at the start of your river season? Visit our Facebook page and share your early season catches with us.