5 Reasons to Go Fishing in Newcastle

Whether you’re an expert in angling or your looking to try your hand at fly fishing, Newcastle upon Tyne’s waters make this city an ideal location for fishermen visiting from across the country.

With varied fishing opportunities in both the River Tyne and the city’s vast collection of angling lakes, there’s no shortage of fishing hotspots to explore in this vibrant metropolis.

Here are 5 reasons you should spend a long weekend casting your line, in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Bridge over Tyne

Image: Shutterstock
The Millennium bridge over the Tyne River

1. Fishing locations

Whether it’s the River Tyne or Stargate Pond, there’s no shortage of places for you to cast your line in Newcastle upon Tyne.

With the coast just a 10 minute drive away from the city centre, the North Sea is brimming with fishing opportunities. James Dixon of North East Kayak fisherman, has created his own location guide detailing the species of fish you can catch along the North East coast.

In addition to the bountiful coastline, Newcastle’s inland lakes and rivers boast a diverse selection of fish in it’s waters, attracting anglers from all over the country.

With 3 lakes spanning over 8 acres of water, the Angel of the North Fishing Lakes provide an unrivalled fishing experience for carp and coarse anglers. But if it’s salmon and sea trout you’re after, stick to the River Tyne.

2. Unrivalled views

Angel of the North

Image: Shutterstock
Angel of the North

From iconic landmarks to the spectacular views of the unspoilt countryside, angling in and around the city centre guarantees a day of peace.

As dusk falls and you pack up your fishing tackle gear for the day, head to the quayside and feast your eyes on the glittering illuminations of the Gateshead Millennium Bridge.

3. Salmon and sea trout spots

a-tyne-salmon

Image: Tyne Salmon Fishing Facebook
A large end of season Tyne Salmon

Attracting around 30,000 salmon each year, the River Tyne is famous for being England’s best river for catching salmon. A vast clean up of the waters has transformed the River Tyne into a haven for wildlife – and its thriving population of salmon and sea trout makes it one of the finest fishing spots in the UK.

With legendary Tyne salmon weighing up to 35lbs, as well as the river’s excellent coarse fishing opportunities, the Tyne promises a challenging catch.

4. Accessible surrounding areas

Image: Tyne Rivers Trust Fishing the Haughton Castle beat

Image: Tyne Rivers Trust
Fishing the Haughton Castle beat

The North East is famed for its affordability, and that includes Newcastle’s fishing opportunities.

Gain access to wild brown trout, salmon and grayling in a choice of 16 different beats within the area with the Tyne Angling Passport scheme. A day ticket from the Tyne Rivers Trust is available for just £8, and offers anglers the opportunity to fish across the Tyne catchment.

After packing up for the day after some great game fishing, why not take a look at the array of affordable and exciting activities in the city centre? Dine in style, or immerse yourself in culture at the Live Theatre. There’s no shortage of things to see and do in Newcastle upon Tyne.

5. An abundance of angling opportunities

Image: Leazes Park Beautiful scenes in the city’s Leazes Park.

Image: Leazes Park
Beautiful scenes in the city’s Leazes Park.

If you’re having to fit your fishing between other activities, you may not have time to travel to spots outside the city. Luckily, you don’t have to.

Just minutes from the city centre, Leazes Park offers roach, tench, bream and carp – perfect for spending an afternoon. Or wake up early and visit Big Waters nature reserve just north of the city. The convenient parking and inner-city public transport systems make it easy to access all corners of Newcastle – so you can make the most of your time in this vibrant city.

Newcastle is a haven of adventure. So, whether you’re seeking somewhere to angle or fancy walk along the treetops, this city is sure to bring you an experience like no other.

When Brown Trout Rule

While I am not immune to the temptation of a late Baetis hatch, I must confess to becoming thoroughly preoccupied with brown trout in the final weeks prior to the arrival of winter on the Henry’s Fork.

Henry's fork brown

Henry’s fork brown.

It is truly a hunter’s mind state that causes me to become armed with a big, nasty streamer and a seven weight fly rod. Moving at a more aggressive pace than usual, I will often cover several hundred yards of a promising run or deep riffle during the prime hours of potential.

A good run

A good run.

Reclusive by nature, a well-seasoned brown trout is at a peak point of accessibility from mid-October through late November. In obeying the mating instinct, even the largest and most secretive adults will occupy habitat that can be thoroughly probed by the determined angler seeking to prevail over a most elusive opponent.

A big, fall brown in full spawning mode is not responding to hunger when it slams a streamer. Instead, the strike is a fierce reaction to a perceived intruder that would challenge territorial dominance.

Uncommon objective

Uncommon objective.

Fast action and big numbers are seldom part of the deal when the objective is so far beyond what is common. A half dozen hours or more of continuous double hauling the big rod can seem, at times, more like work than pleasure. This is particularly true when the day’s effort produces little more than a good physical workout.

But when the drift is interrupted by the sudden presence of throbbing weight, all hours of futility vanish in a matter of seconds. A battle with a heavy fish can be its own reward, but the real prize is something completely visual.

The vivid colors of a fall brown trout are as striking as any in a season known for visual splendor. A big river brown is a muscular animal that seems built for combat, and there is a primal elegance in the powerful jaws and menacing teeth.

Elegant

Elegant.

I look forward to fall and the time when brown trout rule my consciousness with as much anticipation as any season of the year. But there are other times and other trout that are just as important.

And the attention I apply to the rainbow, cutthroat, brook trout, and cut-bows will be no less intense.

Winter Fly Fishing in the Sun

Fly fishing in river

Image source: Shutterstock
Fly to New Zealand in December for some much needed sunshine.

Just because it’s winter, it doesn’t mean you have to fish in the cold. There’s a wealth of fly fishing destinations that are warm while we’re wrapped up in layers of fishing gear.

We’ve taken a month by month look at some of the best winter fly fishing destinations. Take a trip, stay warm, and check out some of the most exciting fly fishing on the planet.

November in the Bahamas

Wahoo fish

Image source: Shutterstock
Catch a Wahoo in The Bahamas

The Bahamas are paradise on Earth. Just ask any of the six million holidaymakers who flock there for the year-round summer and the postcard-perfect beaches.

It’s also a major draw for fly fishers. The world’s most famous bonefishing flats are in the Abacos, a group of 120 islands in the north. From November onwards you can also expect healthy hauls of barracuda, wahoo and snapper.

If you like the idea of a technical, yet rewarding challenge, the bonefish off the islands of Andros, swim right up to you. But when they’re hooked, they can swim off at up to 30mph. That’s when you’ll need to use your skills.

Tips
There are limits on the quantities of certain species. Bahamian fishing regulations require you to obtain a permit to fish, and there are bag limits on wahoo, kingfish and other species.

Fish on as many of the Abacos islands as possible with a chartered boat from Cruise Abaco. They hop from place to place and remain moored overnight, so you get to fish in different waters each day, and wake up in a different cove every morning.

December in the Antipodes

shutterstock_196834541

Image source: Shutterstock
The greatest prize for an angler

Giant black marlin are a tremendously prized catch. There’s no better place to nab one than the stunning Australian Great Barrier Reef in Cairns at the start of the Antipodean summer. These behemoths can weigh in at a massive 750kg.

If you prefer a more remote getaway, head to Cape York. These uninhabited islands have pristine beaches that are excellent for cod and salmon. You’ll need a 4×4 to reach them, but this can only add to the sense of adventure!

A third of New Zealand households once owned a fishing boat, writes Thomas Petch in Angler’s Mail. River fly fishing is just as important as sea fishing. The waters teem with trout at this time of year.

There’s plenty of accessible freshwater fishing in New Zealand. But if you’re after more of an adventure, the North Island is home to creeks and rivers that hold brown and rainbow trout. A count of the creeks in the Central region tallied around 900 fish per kilometre.

Tips
You need a license to fish in New Zealand. Applying online is very simple.

Giant marlin are the dinosaurs of fish. If you’re new to fly fishing, you’ll need an extra pair of hands and expert knowledge from a captain.

Your usual flies may not do the job on the other side of the world. Check out what’s likely to work south of the equator, and get your gotcha ready!

January in Cuba

barracuda

Image source: Shutterstock
There’s always plenty of fish in the Cuban sea

In Cuba’s Cayo Largo there really are “plenty more fish in the sea”. The catch-and-release fly fishing rule means there’s an almost limitless supply of permit, tarpon and barracuda. Guided fishing trips are the best way to experience these stunning waters, as beach fishing is prohibited.

It’s the country’s top resort, but you’re unlikely to spot other anglers along the island’s remarkably peaceful 25km of saltwater flats, as there are only a few boats that take anglers out each day. Its protected status means the sea is replete with coral, and on land you’ll see iguanas and pelicans.

Cayo Largo is just 30 minutes away by plane from the bustling cultural hub of Havana, so you can double up your fishing trip with some full-on tourism, too.

Tips
Avalon’s Fishing Centres provide chartered boats six days a week. They helpfully divide the vast marine park into six areas, taking you to a different one each day.

You’ll need a visa to visit Cuba.

Mosquitos can be voracious in this area. Pack plenty of repellent, or make sure you eat your Marmite before you go!

February in Kenya

Sailfish out of water

Image source: tribe-watersports
Hook yourself a sailfish in Malindi

Kenya’s Malindi coastline is one of the only places where it’s possible to achieve a fantasy slam – that’s hooking five types of billfish in one day, including swordfish and marlin.

The undisturbed beaches are stunning. Early in the year is peak billfish season. It’s also when the weather is at its warmest and driest. February’s the peak time for marlin in this area, and sailfish are in plentiful supply. Further north in Lamu, billfish thrive, and you can pick a fight with a yellowfin tuna in reasonably shallow water.

The town of Malindi merges Italian, Muslim and African influences into its food, architecture and art, so you get a brilliant fly fishing and cultural winter sun break rolled into one.

Tips
Pack a waterproof camera. Whales, dolphins and turtles inhabit these waters. You’ll want to record these images to show everybody back home.

There are over a dozen clubs with boats and crew to accompany you out to sea. It’s a world class fishing destination, so you’ll find it easy to find experienced guides here.

Winter months in Panama and the Florida Keys

Tarpon fish

Image source: Shutterstock
Tarpon jumping for joy in the Florida Keys

Hanging off the southern tip of Florida is Key West. Much of the fly fishing here is done on the flats, which are areas of sea where fish congregate to feed. Think of them like jungle clearings – underwater.

Bonefish, tarpon, redfish and snook are all in abundance during our winter months, and there’s no shortage of experienced guides to take you to the best flats for fishing.

Heading further south? In the local language, Panama means ‘abundance of fish.’ Dorado, fierce deep red cubera snapper and the striking mahi mahi, are all ready to be caught in this Central American country. You can fish from rocky coastlines or sandy beaches.

Gatun Lake in the North of Panama offers amazing freshwater fly fishing for peacock bass and tropical bluegill along with a myriad of tropical species. Protected for over 100 years, the lake is also host to land species like howler monkeys, anteaters and three-toed sloths, making it a nature-lover’s paradise.

Almost entirely surrounded by sea, Panama’s just two and a half hours by plane from Miami.

Tips
In Florida you don’t need a license if you’re fly fishing from a charter boat, this is covered by the company.

If you’re going solo you need to buy one online from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation‘s website or from a local tackle shop.

Yellowfin tuna are at lower numbers in January and February, but this is the peak period for black and blue marlin at up to 600lbs.

There’s a huge fishing world out there beyond the northern hemisphere. Where has your pursuit of winter fishing in the sun taken you? Share your stories on our Facebook page.

Bosnia – The Grayling Dreamscape

Having served in Bosnia in 1999, I never thought that I’d swap a rifle for a fly rod and actually return to fish some of its rivers. I love my small stillwater fishing, so this trip would be something new – a group fishing expedition in search of wild trout and grayling from Bosnia’s world famous Ribnik and Pliva rivers.

So what can you expect in terms of the fishing, hospitality and fun?  Read on to find out!

Fly fishing in Bosnia

Fly fishing in Bosnia.

You just know you’ve made a great decision, when Alex Jardine of Aardvark McLeod, asks if you’re interested in joining a hosted fishing trip to Bosnia? How can you not say yes? The first thing I asked was if my fishing buddy Michael Valler could come too?

Once we arranged the trip, Amy Pople of Aardvark McLeod sent us our code and link to a travel app called Vamoos. This app is just great, as it details maps, weather, travel docs and much needed advice on gear we needed for the trip. Then as you get closer to your departure date, e-flight tickets and confirmation info come through, which is all very exciting stuff.

On the day of trip, we traveled from Heathrow Terminal 5 and flew British Airways to Zagreb. Meeting our fellow party members Alex Jardine, Lewis Hendrie and Tim Wood in the departure lounge, we were also to liaise with Florian Bauman from Germany and Christopher Rownes of Guideline Fly Fishing. Plus already in Ribnik with a two day head start were Toby Merigan of Funky Fly Tying, Glen Wiesner and Chris Hartley.

Flying out on BA was great, with some cracking views of the mountains en-route in. We were met at Zagreb by Milan Bukara from Zepter Passport Travel Company. It is this company that provides guides to fish the Ribnik and Pliva rivers. For our trip we were also lucky to have Milenko Mita Balaban and Renato Opancar as our guides. Both have fished at International level for Bosnia and know the rivers like the backs of their hands.

After a drive through the stunning Bosnain country side, we eventually rocked up at the Ribnik HQ. Here we were taken down to the lodges and shown our rooms which accommodated two anglers. These lodges sit right on the Ribnik river edge and I mean right on it. Set on stilts and concrete stanchions, these Scandinavian type lodges are filled with all the amenities you need to make your stay comfortable. All rooms have TV, WiFi, bags of hot water and comfortable beds. Each hut has steps down to ground level, so you can go fishing, whenever you want – with the river on one side and a small brook on the other you can pitch a fly to the Trout and Grayling at any time.

The accommodation on the Ribnik

The accommodation on the Ribnik.

You can see the allure of this place right off the bat, as you trundle your baggage on the boardwalk over to the accommodation. When I say you’ll love the food, you’ll just have to take my word for it. The meals are all just delicious and with homemade bread at every sitting, which you can get seriously addicted to it. Milan was telling us, that you could put on between 4 and 15 lbs with the food here. So now you have an idea on how we got here and what sort of things to expect. So what about the rivers we fished?

 Ribnik River – first three days

The River Ribnik is a Karst (spring fed limestone) river, 5.6 km long, with an average width of 20-30 m and depth of 1 m. Riverside is covered with willows and other trees. Plentiful types of insects swarm on Ribnik including many types of Baetida throughout the year, numerous types of Trichoptera and of course May fly (Ephemera). This abundant insect world allows fishermen to fish with a dry fly during the entire season long.

Michael fishing the Ribnik

Michael fishing the Ribnik.

On the first morning Michael and I have a brief cast or two on the river, outside the accommodation, then meet outside the restaurant and fishing office at 8am to load up our fishing tackle and other gear for the short journey to the river. Our guides Mita and Renato are waiting in the mini buses and after a short five minute drive, we arrive at the café, where we’ll have lunch. It’s here that there is a very nice chap, who ties some really neat small flies that we need. He ties 18’s and 20’s in small beaded nymphs and CDC dries, which look just brilliant. They’re a lot smaller than we’d brought with us, so we buy more, in readiness to wet a line.

Extra small CDC dries are very effective on Bosnian rivers.

Size 18 & 20 CDC dries are very effective on Bosnian rivers.

This stretch of the Ribnik river looks just wonderful, with crystal clear water. There’s a lot of weed here with pockets of clear pebbly patches, which we spot fish in. Once you get accustomed to viewing the bottom, you begin to see fish in the pockets and on the weed, with the odd fish in the weed overhangs.

On the first morning there are lots of Grayling and Trout moving, but we are struggling to make contact with some fish. At the moment there is nothing hatching off, but Renato says there will be some surface activity soon. Renato goes on to explains about the fish feeding on different types of olives, stonefly and mayfly. Then says that you can fish dry fly most of the time, but normally first thing is a micro Nymph as the fly of choice then as the sun warms the water, a switch to dries is a good approach.

We try a few casts and Renato demo’s a quick cast on fishing tiny nymphs. Renato shows us the size of the shrimp patterns he fishes here and they are only about 12 to 14mm long. My imitations look massive by comparison. So with my new found knowledge, I make a cast that covers a small pebble patch. The line stops with Renato saying “fish” and I miss my first take, so re-cast to the same spot. A quick mend on the line and I watch the line tip, slink toward me. Spotting the slightest twitch on the line tip, I lift the rod and feel the rod tip bounce!  This is what we traveled for and I am well chuffed. A small grayling of about 5oz, but very welcome on a new method.

Whilst watching Michael fishing away I notice a grayling behind me about 2 ft away in the turbulent water that I’m creating by standing in the current. Amazingly, they’re feeding on the debris that’s being dislodged by my wading boots, in between the small pebbles.

The fish eventually start responding to a hatch, so delving into one of his fly boxes Renato plucks out a small size 18 dry for me – it is brown bodied with a small CDC wing. He peels off about 2ft of fluorocarbon and knots this to my leader. I make a short cast slightly upstream and see a small rise to the right of my fly, so I let the fly drift down and out of the main current seam. A quick splashy rise sparkles the water surface and I lift onto a fish!

I am well chuffed and look toward Michael who is also in. A double up and both of us, on different methods too. This river is quite something else!

a small grayling in silver armour

A small grayling in silver armour.

In the Ribnik’s crystal clear water you can watch as Grayling sidle up right at your side. I found this activity just mesmerizing and it’s great to watch, as you get to see how the bigger residents move about. Once they occupy a point in a clear patch, another grayling of similar size will move in too. If a bigger fish comes over, the small ones move sideways, but not out of the feeding zone – a bit like a family group, but these groups can get big!  Before I know it, there are 20 or 30 fish of varying size, fining away at pace with the current and their food.

We found that first day just fabulous, where we were missing takes and cursing our slow reactions, then laughing as a rod tip starts dancing away. Funny as hell and also quite relaxing too, as you’re trying to concentrate on fishing, then glance up to a mountainside view, that looks just stunning.

One day melts into the other

With the alarm on my phone buzzing away at 6am, we’re getting sorted for the second days fishing. On the short trip to the Ribnik, we make a quick visit to the fly shack and also pick up some thinner tippet for the dries later. Hopefully this will change our fortunes for the better.

On this morning’s foray, we make for the run below the Aquarium Pool again. Roving the fast water, I spot a small rise just off the main current between two current seams that is pushing water toward some logs and branches.  I make a short cast into the upstream eddie with a micro nymph and watch my line tip stop – and lift into a fish. Piling the pressure on, I’ve just seen this beast and what I initially thought it was small, is much bigger. At about 2lb, this is a nice looking fish. These larger Ribnik grayling have red flourishes near their vent, adding a little more colour to these already beautiful fish.

A nice 2lb Ribnik grayling

A nice 2lb Ribnik grayling.

During the fight, Lewis Hendrie shouted over from the other side of the river, that he has just caught a 3lb Grayling! Mita is on hand with him, to take a picture before he releases it.

Lewis Hendrie with a 3lb+ grayling.

Lewis Hendrie with a 3lb+ grayling.

After a cracking days fishing, that evening we discover a few of our party have caught some serious specimen fish. As dinner is served and the beer starts flowing, everyone is chatting about the fishing, the flies and the rainbows being caught by ‘’Rainbow Man’’ aka Glenn Wiesner. To quote Glenn ‘’I’ve traveled 2000 miles from America to catch rainbows!’’ We all burst out laughing. Funny as hell.

The next morning sees us walking down in the woods below the café, then after lunch we spend our day, back at our favorite run. Here, there are fish all over the place –  I take around eight fish which were stacked up on a long weed fringe. Picking them off the tail of the pod as they hit a small #18 olive goldhead nymph.

A Ribnik grayling - taken on a size 18 olive nymph

A Ribnik grayling – taken on a size 18 olive nymph.

Nearby Michael latches into a neat a neat looking brownie, which gives him the run around on the goldhead nymph. Soon after, he then connects with something solid, which he has on for while, and then pops the hook. Very unlucky indeed.

Michael with a Ribnik brownie

Michael with a Ribnik brownie.

There are lots of rises surrounding us, so we switch onto fishing the dries for the afternoon, until we realise that time has caught us up and it’s time to leave the Ribnik. I am a little gutted as this, as the Ribnik river has really kept me entertained.

The Pliva – a bigger water

The 33km spring fed river Pilva is famous for it’s clean water, which comes from cold Karst springs in the fertile limestone rocks, making this Bosnian river unique and full of trout and grayling.

River Pilva in Stunning Bosnian countryside

River Pilva in Stunning Bosnian countryside.

An hour and a half drive saw us travel from the Ribnik fishing centre to Pedja’s bar at Radoja on the Pilva river.  As we arrive Mita crosses the road bridge and pulls in for us to take a look – we see several of our party casting at rising fish, as darkness descends.

The Radoja set up is brilliant. Split into two houses and a bar/restaurant on site, we arrive to find ex policeman Pedja and his wife have a hog roast going, with Šljivovica (plum brandy) and shot glasses at the ready. When Pedja walks over to meet us, he is passing round shots for an initial toast. Now that we all have a drink the laughs begin and this night is a long one! Thank you Pedja.

The following morning with groggy heads after numerous shots of Šljivovica we head for the restaurant. With coffee and caffeine hitting the right spot, we can begin the day. Then Pedja comes around with shot glasses which I just can’t face today….

We make a short drive past the Pliva river, which now looks massive in daylight. It is at least twice as wide as the Ribnik, but also a whole lot deeper and tougher to wade. We take a first look from a bridge and spot some massive browns in the clear pebbly patches, but these are well out of my casting range with a four weight rod.

River Pilva - massive browns fin below

River Pilva – massive browns fin below.

Renato takes us to the river to get ready and we all split up. Starting with a small #18 CDC dry and around 12ft of 7x tippet I make a short cast, watching the drift in the current. There are fish everywhere, not just in the patches but on the weed too and in the big holes.

It is not long and I lift into my first Pliva grayling. Small, but still nice to feel the rod tip bounce.  A quick glance to admire it then he’s away. Renato comes over and suggests a change to nymphs. Michael is already rigged with one and has caught  too. So we’re off the mark and very happy fishing here.

Pillva river grayling

Pillva river grayling.

Later on, I make a few casts on a deep pool, with some fast water running at pace through it. Using a Czech nymph which Renato has given me, I try bugging with my fly line clear of the water, just watching the leader.  Because of the sheer weight of the fly, this isn’t a cast but more of an upstream lob. Watching the leader which isn’t being affected by drag on the fly line, I just catch the leader stop and tighten my line hand and feel the rod tip bounce. I have never tried this method, but what a reaction on a take!!  A little brownie pops up with the nymph in his top lip. After a quick tussle in the current, I slip the fly out and watch the fish bolt for the cover of the fast current and safety.

With lunch looming we make our way back downstream to the first hut we saw.  We are spoiled rotten with some monster burgers and cold beer and coke to wash it down. After last night’s activities the drinks are very much appreciated very welcome on what is a hot afternoon.

Post lunch Mikey and I head upstream and agree with everyone to meet at the top bridge for pick up tonight. We both tie on new leader in 7X about 12 ft long.  Michael has opted for the goldhead size #18 and I’m using a small CDC dry. I hook up a small brownie and after a little tussle move to Michael, as we start a cast and move leapfrog upstream. Working through fast runs, we take plenty of small grayling in the tail water, that are sipping duns.

A Pilva brownie

A Pilva brownie.

As the light starts to fade, so the others roll in and we all end up near the bridge and café, where there’s always a beer to be had. So with the day finally over we head back to Pedja’s and get ready for dinner.

Back to the Ribnik

We agree that in the morning that we’d like to go back to the Ribnik for the last days, so Mita does the arranging and we have a beer.

Next day after breakfast, we mount the mini bus for the journey back to Gornji Ribnik. We park up downstream of the pub and the Aquarium Pool. We split and head off to the river, with Michael and me opting for a close session where we have parked. We begin short casting with small pods of fish all over this long glide. Then a group of Italians drop into the river below us, forcing out of the pool in search of another tasty spot.  We move down and end up at our favourite spot, with fish showing everywhere. Spotting a few fish near the trailing weed in the centre run, I make a short cast and hook up on a feisty little brown. Then another and another.  In total about a dozen or more come to hand in a fast and furious session zapping the fly as it hits the current seam.

Casting upstream directly ahead of me and a splashy rise hits my fly, I connect for a brief second and feel the hook hold, and then we part company. Cursing my luck, I recast to the same spot. I see a tiny rise form and my fly is gone!  A tough, dogged fight ensures – my rod is hooped over and I have very little control, so I opt to wade downstream and get the fish above me, so I can eventually scoop it into the net. Now we can take a look at this beaut of a fish, with just amazing colour and the Ribnik signature blush.

My biggest grayling

My biggest grayling.

Lunch is calling so we head up to the mini bus for a catch up and our last lunch at the Ribnik café. Beers ordered and lunch on the way, I begin to think back to that last fish.  What a beast and I’m rightly chuffed too to land it!  After lunch Michael and I walk the path back upstream to the pool above the café. There are lots of brownies here, some small and some larger grayling too. We’re trying CDC dries and we both hook up in the riffle water, which is great.  I take four or five more small fish and ping another good one. The afternoon is spent engaging with the smaller residents, but nothing large. Absorbed in the action before we know it we heading back down to meet the other lads and transport back to Pedja’s.

With our last day looming, we head to the bar and dinner. Pedja has the shot glasses ready so we all take a hit, then get a beer or two. Reminiscing over the last week, we’ve caught some good fish and for Michael and me, the Ribnik has been our out and out favourite water. We talk over flies and share pics on our latest catches, which is very cool.

The following morning Michael, Florian, Tim and I opt to walk over to the other side and start fishing a shallow run above a bar. There are loads of fish here and they’re spooky as hell. Renato tells us the fish are taking the nymph which he can see by their reactions in the water. He spots for me as I make a slightly longer 20ft cast. The line settles on the water surface and I make an upstream mend. Watching the line Renato says, “Fish” and I push my tip downstream to make a quicker connection. With a pulse at the rod tip, I am very happy with the hit, albeit a small grayling. Renato moves to Michael to change flies and offer his advice on fishing this run.

Renato comes back over to me and offers a Czech nymph. Working down toward Michael, I hear a holler and Renato has caught a fab looking brownie.  Butter yellow belly with ash black spots looking gorgeous in this sun.  He squeezes off some pics, then releases it for someone else.

Renato's brown trout

Renato’s brown trout.

After more productive morning fishing, lunch arrives and we all clink bottles on our last bankside feed before flying tomorrow. This all seems surreal now, with the week having flown by. As we settle back, we watch a local chap in action, who looks like someone who has done this before. He exits the water after hooking up on several fish. Later he comes over to us with a bottle of Šljivovica and shows us the flies he uses. Tiny CDC’s in #20 and #22’s then he gives me four of them. Absolutely mint ties and super small. Then, as quickly as our days starts, after some great afternoon fishing it comes to a nice conclusion with Lewis chatting with the local angler, comparing fish catches. Ace.

We wake the following morning at 6am to get to Zagreb Airport. We pack the minibus and say our farewells to Pedja and his family. What a feeling of mixed emotions. Sadness at leaving this wonderful country, with the knowing that tonight, we’ll be sleeping in our own beds and no driving to the fishing in the morning.

Thanks

After a wonderful trip, I must say a massive thanks to Alex Jardine and Aardvark McLeod, for putting this adventure together. Also Zepter Passport with Milan Bukara for setting us up with fabulous fishing and lending us their top guides in Milenko Mita Balaban and Renato Opancar. Both very capable chaps who have a wealth of knowledge and make great company for us. Personally I’d like to thank Renato, for showing us a level of patience that a saint would he proud of. Plus putting us in front of some great fish. Last but by no means least to everyone who made us feel truly welcome.

For more information about fishing in Bosnia please contact Aardvark McLeod here.

Alex Jardine of Aardvark McLeod

Trip host Alex Jardine of Aardvark McLeod.

 

In Praise of Baetis By Rene’ Harrop

There are plenty of reasons to choose a month other than October to visit the Henry’s Fork.
 

At high elevation, the weather can resemble winter rather than autumn and human comfort can be a missing ingredient on any given day of fishing at this time of year.

Beneath the Tetons

Beneath the Tetons.

Brutal currents created by low, clear water flowing over dense aquatic vegetation can bring instant corruption to the drift of the most carefully executed presentation, and the trout are at the finely honed peak of angler resistance.

Baetis gathering

Baetis gathering.

Adding even more difficulty to the possibility for success is the need to fish flies that drop as small as size 24 and average only one or two sizes larger.

Things get even more interesting when a 6X tippet becomes too large for the conditions and the objective is a trout that may exceed twenty inches in length.

With so much to contend with, one could question the logic if not the sanity of anyone who might travel thousands of miles specifically for the purpose of subjecting themselves to a most daunting undertaking.

Sunset on a Baetis day

Sunset on a Baetis day.

Remarkably, however, this is the time that attracts more who travels great distance to the Fork than at any other point in the season, and they are some of the finest fly fishermen I have ever met.

It is the time when Baetis rule this great river, and I am indebted to these tiny mayflies.
 

It is because of Baetis and what they represent as an experience that I have been given the opportunity to share time on the water with friends I might otherwise have never met. Some are from distant states within the continental U.S., but others travel much farther.

An international mix

An international mix.

Japan, Wales, Sweden, Norway, France, and South Africa are on a list of foreign countries that have been represented on the banks of the Henry’s Fork during Baetis time, and some will return every year.

Thank you Baetis.

Fishing Wisconsin’s Brule River – The River of Presidents

This autumn Fishtec’s Ceri Thomas had the opportunity to fish the Bois Brule river in America’s upper Midwest. Read on to find out how he fared on the river of presidents, deep in the northwoods.

The Brule River Wisconsin

The Brule River Wisconsin.

Northern Wisconsin’s Brule river is a unique waterway that flows north into the vastness of Lake Superior. Passing through pristine ‘northwoods’ boreal forest, consisting of poplar, alder, cedar, birch and conifers, the Brule is quite special as it is spring fed in it’s upper reaches, therefore having a constant cool temperature and good flow. This makes it extremely hospitable to salmonid fish species; In fact brook trout (the native fish) brown, rainbow, steelhead, coho and chinook salmon all thrive and breed here.

A river of two halves

The Brule river can be divided in two distinct fisheries – the upper part of the river meanders slowly through pine forest and swamp, where it sometimes expands into shallow lakes where eagles soar overhead, deer swim and wild turkey roam the bankside undergrowth. Log jams, fallen trees, and undercut swampy banks all provide abundant habit for three species of trout – brown, brook and rainbow. Large migratory browns from Lake Superior also like to hole up in this part of the river. The upper river and lakes can be accessed from several road bridges and waded in a few areas, but is perhaps best fished from a canoe.

The upper Brule river.

The upper Brule river.

Half way along it’s forty nine mile course the Brule abruptly changes character and becomes a brawling, fast flowing river with a strong deep flow, much more like a freestoner. Here the quarry switches to lake run steelhead and salmon, suitable for wade fishing only with fly and spinning techniques.

The river of presidents

The Brule is sometimes referred to as the ”river of presidents.” It was on the banks of the upper river that several United States presidents essentially relocated the White house and spent their summers fly fishing. The Brule’s fishing presidents were Grant, Cleveland, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Harry Trueman and Dwight Eisenhower. They stayed in secluded log cabins in the midst of the woods at the private estates built by lumber barons, including the grand Cedar Island Estate. Here they fished by canoe in the main river and also in large spring ponds, safe from prying eyes. Back in those days, the fishing for brook trout was simply incredible – the now extinct ‘coaster strain’ were lake run brookies that averaged 3lb and ran to 14lb.

US President Calvin Coolidge fishing the Brule.

US President Calvin Coolidge fishing the Brule.

Fishing the Brule

During my five days on the Brule, I did plenty of wade fishing – including two tough morning sessions for steelhead in the lower reaches, where I landed small browns and rainbows in abundance, but not my intended targets.

Steelhead fishing the lower Brule river

Steelhead fishing the lower Brule river.

On the upper river I spent some time fishing the famous ‘big lake’, the largest lake in the Brule system, and also at spots above the Winnebojou bridge and Highway 2. I caught a lot of fish each time – numerous eager native brookies, small rainbows (most are juvenile steelhead) and a good number of browns to 12 inches all came to hand, using a selection of dries and streamers.

A Brule river brook trout

A Brule river brook trout.

Early morning on Big Lake, Brule River.

Early morning on Big Lake, Brule River.

What I noticed was Brule fish especially loved big dry flies, and were eager to strike at them. A large klinkhammer special proved a winner, especially when cast tight to cover.

Brule river trout love dry flies

Brule river trout love dry flies.

I also encountered coho salmon on big lake, and landed a fresh, silver brace using a black woolly bugger. These diminutive salmon fought like demons for their size. Some big Chinooks in excess of 20lb were also spotted, many in full spawning mode.

A brace of Brule river Coho salmon

A brace of Brule river Coho salmon.

I spent one afternoon in a canoe on big lake, where gusty winds and bright sun made it hard to fish – despite this plenty of brook trout, small browns and rainbows took klinkhammer specials and streamers with gusto, fished close to cover.

A beer stop on big lake

A beer stop on big lake.

You could say there are game fish for every discipline here – the species selection of naturally reproducing salmonids on the Brule is simply incredible; it was hard to say what you might hook into next. At times I caught brook, brown and rainbow all in consecutive casts – you cannot do that in many rivers in the world!

Brule river grand slam - brown, brook and rainbow.

Brule river grand slam – brown, brook and rainbow.

Night fishing

Brule river guides and local anglers have a tradition of night fishing for brown trout on the calmer waters of the upper river – resident and lake run browns behave much like our sea trout do in the UK.

In summer and autumn the bigger browns on the Brule become almost exclusively night feeders, preferring to slurp down hapless rodents swimming past in the dark. See the image below for proof of this!

Evidence Trout eat mice - a Brule night feeder

Evidence Trout eat mice – a Brule night feeder.

Large surface lure patterns fished on 7 weighs are the order of the day. Fishing out of a canoe is the best way to do this, but you can also wade in some areas such as the south west shore of big lake.

My experience of night fishing this trip was on the Brule’s famous night fishing spot, ‘big lake’ with my uncle, local fishing guide Tom Heffernan. The early evening was spent casting dries and soft hackle wets tight to overhanging cedar trees, log jams and weed edges. I landed around a dozen small but beautiful brook trout and a 12 inch brown using my 9′ #5 Sage fly rod to start things off.

A brook trout that fell for a soft hackle on Big lake.

A brook trout that fell for a soft hackle on Big lake.

Before we began night fishing proper, we joined some of the local guides for a traditional northwoods dinner in a shelter on the lake shore – a delicious feast of bacon, fried potatoes and chicken were cooked up in the cold evening air, all washed down with beer and vodka.

A tradition Brule river guides supper

A traditional Brule river guides supper.

The 7 weight rods were then rigged up with various floating abominations, including the Hanks creation – a local night fishing special tied by Steve Therrien. (For more info, check out this blog post by Steve).

The hanks creation surface lure

The hanks creation surface lure.

I choose to rig up with a Jambo, a wake fly that works great on Welsh Sea trout. The Jambo’s small flying trebles ensure a better ratio of hookups, something surface lures are notoriously bad at – big single hooks can let you down. Combine with low stretch Airflo fly lines and you have a combination that will result in far more conversions… that was the theory anyway.

After our campfire feast the night was fully dark and we headed out into the lake. It turned out Tom knew every stone, log and channel by heart – it was remarkable; not a wrong turn or harsh bump on a rock was to be felt, a mean feat in what was a pitch black night.

Following Toms directions I worked the Jambo in several prime spots – resulting in 5 fierce takes, with 4 fish landed, 2 of 14 inches, one of 15 and a plump 17 incher that felt as if it had a few mice in its fat belly. After an hour of good fishing we found the other end of the lake crowded, and with a cold mist descending we left the lake – but not before hearing a lure angler on the shore tussling with what sounded like a true behemoth of a fish in the darkness.

Night feeding Brule river browns.

Night feeding Brule river browns.

The Brule didn’t give up it’s biggest fish for me this trip, but what they lacked in size they certainly made up for in numbers. The fishing here is really all about the experience – on the Brule there is a calming remoteness and feeling of pure escapism from civilization.

The Brule river – the ultimate northwoods experience.

The Brule river – the ultimate northwoods experience.

Afloat or wading you can easily imagine yourself back in time at the days of the first pioneers, with nothing but the sound of eagles, woodpeckers, flowing water and wind in the pines to keep you company. It’s little wonder presidents wanted to fish here, to get away from it all. For a true northwoods wilderness experience, this is one for your bucket list.

The Best Month By Rene’ Harrop

There is never a time when I am more distracted by fly fishing than October.

In a year of negative extremes with respect to weather and water conditions, October brings a welcome relief from hot, dry, and extremely windy weather. Uncommonly high and often turbid flows in the Henry’s Fork have been replaced by low, clear currents, and dry fly fishing is the best it has been in months. Daily hatches of Mahogany Duns, Baetis, and midges have the trout looking up and the fishermen smiling.

Baetis time

Baetis time.

Competing for my attention are the waters of Yellowstone Park where the Fire Hole, Madison and Yellowstone all beckon me northward.

While surface feeding becomes largely nonexistent on most local lakes, there is no more tempting time to be on Hebgen, Sheridan, and Henry’s Lake. October brings urgency to these wonderful still waters as the largest inhabitants feed ravenously on subsurface organisms in advance of the approaching winter.

Hook up on Henry's

Hook up on Henry’s.

As the month progresses I become almost frantic when the mating urge sends the big male brown into a state of frenzy. As colder temperatures begin to dominate, I will return to my winter home in St. Anthony where the remainder of October and even longer will be spent throwing streamers on the lower Henry’s Fork.

October magic throwing streamers

October magic throwing streamers.

With more opportunity than time, I will try to sample every item on October’s expanded fishing menu, and I will gorge myself on some.

Henry's lake cutty.

Henry’s lake cutty.

In a land where winter arrives early and leaves late, I will compress more fishing into October than any other month. Beyond that time, there is no assurance that frigid weather will not put an end to fishing for another year, although I will hope for more.

It is with this in mind that I will savor each day as though it is the last while building the memories that sustain me through deep winter. This is life in the high country and I would have it no other way.

Fly Fishing Ireland – River Fishing in County Wexford

It was that time of year again for a family holiday. My destination this summer was the Republic of Ireland, a thatched cottage near Ballyedmond in rural County Wexford to be precise. Naturally I had to scope out the fishing opportunities in the area!

I began researching the region online. It turned out County Wexford has no Loughs or stillwater’s of any note, so the options would have to be river angling. As it happens it looked like we were practically on the banks of a tributary of the Ounavarragh (or Owenavorragh) river, an 18 mile long trout, salmon and sea trout fishery flowing through verdant Irish country side. There was scant information available online about this river, but I did manage to locate a blog style website for the local fishing club, detailing where to get permits.

The Owenavorragh County Wexford

The Owenavorragh County Wexford.

Next thing was to ensure the trout fishing river gear was organised and packed. A tip for doing this is to create a ‘favourites’ fly box and really strip down your tackle. I managed to compact everything into a TF Gear F8 chest pack. My chosen rod was a 7’6 #3/4 weight Streamtec rod, in 4 sections so easily stowable.

Once in Ireland (after the obligatory first pint of Guinness!) The mission to find a permit began. The ice cream parlor was closed, I went to the wrong Jewellers store, but eventually the right place was located, only to find the usual mild confusion when requesting a ticket. All was sorted when Pascal, the proprietor at Whitmores Jewellers emerged at the counter. A lovely chap, he gave me a few tips on where to head. For just 25 Euro for the week I was all set.

Unfortunately you don’t get a map with your ticket, so it was a case of working it out yourself by doing a bit of driving about and looking over bridges for likely spots – all part of the fun.

After enjoying a nice family day out, I was set to hit the river for the first time, snatching a few hours in the late afternoon on quite a warm day. The spot I found was near where we were staying on the upper reaches of the river. It wasn’t really a river here, more a brook to be fair. Slow to moderate flow, weedbeds and nice undercut banks all looked very fishy.

Rising Trout on the first bend

Rising Trout on the first bend.

Ducking under a bridge, I spotted a riser on the first bend which came to hand on a  dry ant pattern. A small jewel like fish, pretty as a picture. Working upriver, overhead trees and undergrowth made for challenging fishing, but it’s what I am used to on the Wye and Usk streams at home. A few more beautiful little trout came to hand – mainly on dries and the duo, even streamers worked in some very slow still segments.

Small but perfectly formed - victim of the duo

Small but perfectly formed – victim of the duo.

What stuck me immediately was the sheer quantity of fish – each and every pool was literally swarming with them. Now this isn’t usually a problem (quite the opposite for most places!) but in this case I have to say there are almost too many fish in this river! This created an issue, because as soon as I moved into a new pool numerous ‘sentries’ at the tail end bolted upriver, altering every fish in the area. Once this happened, the small gin clear pools were literally churned up with dozens of stampeding spooked brownies; many were small 6 – 8 inch fish but with a few bigger ones thrown into the mix. Most of my fish therefore came to longer range casts than normal for a small stream.

Meadow stretch of the Owenavorragh river

Meadow stretch of the Owenavorragh river.

Next outing I tried a few miles further down river. Here the river was a little bigger, with nice meadow pools going into a wooded section above a bridge. The issue remained with the sheer numbers of small spooky fish, making it tough. Still, I winkled out quite a few; beauties each one – small but perfectly formed. The duo method worked best, casting into any pool head or crease, closer to the bank the better.  Some of the sections were deepish slow water with little flow making the duo hard to fish. A solution was to pitch a streamer upriver, into the edges on a longer line. A sink and draw retrieve got me plenty of hits, and lured a few better fish from under bankside cover.

Streamers can be very effective on small streams

Streamers can be surprising effective on small rivers.

As holiday time is precious, particularly with the weather being exceptionally good I took to visiting the Owenavorragh early mornings, for just a few hours before breakfast. 6.30 am starts are worth it – stunning sunrises, misty banks and jewel like trout were the reward. I also observed a large shoal of sea trout in one crystal clear pool, quite a sight.

Irish stream trout - worth getting up early for

Stunning Irish stream trout – worth getting up early for!

My favourite part of the fishing (and the holiday overall) was taking my two girls aged 5 and 7 fishing on the small tributary just a minutes walk down the road from our cottage. This was just a tiny brook, but with one big pool which was teeming with trout. Fishing one at a time, part of the adventure was us clambering down to the water, wading ankle deep under a bridge and then creeping up on the trout through thick undergrowth.

I attached a Fulling Mill  mini pimp indicator to the leader with a small nymph and instructed the girls to watch it – any movement and we would strike! As it happened, we had over a dozen fine Irish trout from that spot, plus spotted an eel and other stream-life. The girls were thrilled to be involved and carefully returned all the fish to the water after taking a look at them – hopefully giving them the angling bug for life. I’m proud to say It was their highlight of the holiday as well as mine.

Successful stream angling in Ireland

Successful stream angling in Ireland.

The River Owenavorragh isn’t a ‘big fish’ river, but it is one of the prettiest I have ever fished, with wild trout to match. A lovely location and well worth wetting a line in if you are in that part of Ireland.

Fly Fishing in Madeira

On a recent family holiday, Fishtec’s Ceri Thomas experienced some unusual freshwater fly fishing on the sub-tropical island of Madeira.

Rainbow Trout in Madeira

Rainbow Trout in Madeira.

With the prospect of a two week cruise holiday to the Canary islands, Portugal and Madeira with absolutely no fishing, I started to research our stop-off destinations for fishing opportunities – just in case there was a slim chance of wetting a line! Madeira was our first landing place, and looked the most likely option.

When you think of Madeira you automatically think of big game fish – wahoo, tuna, sailfish that sort of stuff. Although a pure adrenaline rush if you actually hook a fish, for me this sort of fishing can be a bit tedious, time consuming and expensive in reality; so to my surprise when I googled ‘fishing in Madeira’  I discovered that the island also has rivers containing trout.

Digging deeper I found a guided fishing service located in Funchal, just outside the port where I would disembark. ‘Mad Trout Maderia’ was the name of the outfitter, and after a quick facebook message I found they offered very reasonable rates for guided trips to the best streams, including pick up and drop off back to the port – just perfect for a quick holiday fishing fix.

Port of Funchal - Madeira.

Port of Funchal – Madeira.

The day came and we docked at the port of Funchal. A quick bus ride into the town center, and I was met by Joao Mata, one of the Mad Trout guides. Joao was easily identifiable in a columbia shirt, cap and polarized glasses. After a quick meet and greet, Joao ushered me into an unlikely looking vehicle for a fishing guide – a smart car.

We began our journey through the steep and winding streets of Funchal, until we passed through the city and onto the roads the encircle the island. The views as we drove were spectacular; the islands interior soared green and steep thousands of meter’s above us. Some of the roads on our contorted route went through extremely long tunnels dug through the mountains, and others on ledges high above the crashing sea. Glimpses of rocky rivers came and went as we drove. Joao explained we were heading to the north side of the island, which was the steeper side and more exposed to the prevailing moist Atlantic winds.

As our journey progressed we talked about the history of trout fishing on the Island.
Joao explained they were introduced it the 1950’s, and rainbows and browns were initially stocked. The browns pretty much vanished and didn’t thrive, but the rainbows went on to flourish.

Although it should be technically impossible, the rainbows manage to spawn in some streams and are now reproducing naturally. This may be because the center of the island is high enough to get some snow in winter, and the water filters in and under volcanic rock so the many streams are cold enough to support salmonid fish above 200 meter altitude.

Rainbows manage to reproduce naturally in Madeira

Rainbows manage to reproduce naturally in Madeira.

Most of the streams in Maderia now hold rainbow trout; they are able to spread due to the extensive network of Levadas – man-made water channels designed to carry water from excess rainfall in the interior to the agricultural fields that extend all around the island.
Some streams are still kept stocked from a fish farm on the Island to provide some ‘trophy’ fishing, but the vast majority are wild.

There were plenty of nice looking rivers to be seen on our route, however Joao explained not all are easily fishable – apparently many are so steep and rocky that getting into the ravines can be very tricky, and you may find only a few yards of fishable water before a rock the size of a house completely blocks your path. So today we were heading to a prolific stream with decent access called the ”Ribeira do Seixal” at the north east corner of the Island.

Fishing the Ribeira do Seixal - A stream full of trout

Fishing the Ribeira do Seixal – A stream full of trout.

Our final ascent took us into a steep ravine, with a recent landslip on the flank of the mountain side at the parking spot. Far above us green clad forest slopes rose into the clouds. The temperature this high up was surprisingly cool, with a stiff wind coming off the sea, funneling up the gorge. Thankfully it was at my back!

We reached the stream – it was fairly small, very rocky with gin clear water which took on a pure blue colour from the rock, and absolutely beautiful. Deep plunge pools and pocket water were the order of the day.

Fishing a pocket with the Airflo streamtec 10' 3/4 rod

Fishing a pocket with the Airflo streamtec 10′ 3/4 rod

I had brought along two rods with me, a 10 foot 3/4 and 7’6 3/4 Airflo streamtec so I rigged up with the long rod and proceeded to tie on a jig nymph on a french leader with a 2.5mm bead. After a few fish-less pools I tied on a much heavier bug on a 5mm on a 12 jig hook, and the results were almost instant. In fact the first strike resulted in a palm size fish flying up and out of the water!

The first fish - wild rainbow perfection.

The first fish – wild rainbow perfection.

Joao negotiating his way upstream

Joao negotiating his way upstream.

We hopped and scrambled our way up the ravine. It was strenuous stuff, and certainly not the sort of fishing if you are unsure on your feet. There was no need for waders as wading would have been near impossible anyway on the slippery boulders. At one point we scaled an old dam and skirted a Lavada. As we went trout after trout came to hand – most were only a few inches with the best being perhaps 8 -9 in length. All were truly stunning miniature gem-like fish, with an incredible variance in colour – some were almost black, others bright, with all shades in between.

A nearly black rainbow trout

A nearly black rainbow trout

Amazing markings on a miniature bow'

Amazing markings on a miniature bow’

I must have had a dozen or so on the french leader, with many more missed and spooked, when I hit a snag and lost the leader end and indicator. This was the perfect time to switch rod to the 7’6 3/4, with Airflo Super-dri Xceed 3 Weight line. Joao had suggested a big dry, as it was his favourite method and the most fun.

The klinkhammer getting greedily devoured!

The klinkhammer was greedily devoured!

So, despite the complete lack of fly or rises I tied on a big klinkhammer. The results were instantaneous – from the word go the fish wanted the dry, and launched themselves from all manner of deep turbulent holes to get it, often in kamakazie attacks at the last minute, or even in groups. Many were missed and lost, but it was great sport and the much softer rod was much more fun.

Hungry for the dry.

Hungry for the dry.

Ravenous for klinks'

Gulping down the klinks’

As we worked our way up most likely looking pools held fish. The scenery was stunning, and the location was as unique and remote as anything I have yet fished in my angling career.

The scenery was stunning, and the location unique

The scenery was stunning, and the location unique

After around 4 hours I began to tire – the rock hopping was taking its toll! We worked our way back downstream, fishing the choice spots where we had spooked fish earlier. In the end I was creeping behind rocks and dropping the fly on a downstream drift into pocket – and the ravenous fish obliged. I had long lost count of the fish numbers by then, so I asked Joao ”How many do you think?” His reply – ”Forty plus .. Just like the line!”

Last fish of the day

Last fish of the day – a lump!

We were done for the day, and began our descent from the mountains. Joao insisted we stop at a ‘poncha’ bar for a quick drink on the way back to warm us up – poncha being the true locals drink made with local sugar cane rum, honey, sugar, lemon rind and with orange juice. True to it’s name it did pack a punch!

Joao with a glass of poncha

Joao with a glass of poncha.

Madeira is certainly something different, and the streams are well worth fishing if you find yourself on the island. I can heartily recommend services of Mad Trout Madeira – thanks Joao and the Mad trout team for a great day.

For details of Madeira fly fishing visit www.madeiratroutfishing.com

 

A Big Winter for the Henry’s Fork – By Rene’ Harrop

Every month Fishtec presents a blog post written by American guide and author Rene’ Harrop. They get ‘proper’ winters across the pond – check out the images below!

With unusually warm temperatures and modest snowfall, I became spoiled during the past two winters on the Henry’s fork. In 2015, conditions reasonable for fishing were common throughout the month of January on the lower river, and by mid-February I was making the drive to Last Chance almost weekly to fish Baetis hatches at an elevation of nearly 7,000 feet.

Brave winter souls.

Brave winter souls.

At St. Anthony, 2,000 feet lower, spring arrived about 5 weeks earlier than usual and hatches such as March Browns, caddis, and Salmon flies were proportionately early as well. But there was a penalty to be paid for the absence of snowfall and frigid temperatures through a time when both weather features would be considered typical.

With reservoir storage well below normal, water flows in the Henry’s Fork were alarmingly low through late spring and early summer. However, the reverse was true in mid-summer when flows were increased to a level that became actually hazardous for wading and brought considerable disruption to the timing and volume of hatches.

Henry's Fork at Last Chance.

Henry’s Fork at Last Chance.

Fortunately, timely rain brought reduction of irrigation demands downstream, and river flows became considerably more stable from late summer into early fall.
With both Henry’s Lake and Island Park Reservoir depleted to seriously low levels, flows in the Henry’s Fork were reduced to well below what is considered ideal for the fishery in late October and would see only a minor increase as the year came to an end.

It is now a month into the new year and I have not fished since early December. In most years I would be suffering separation issues, but that is not the case in 2016.
Beginning in mid-December 2015, weather on the Henry’s Fork has been exactly what is needed to restore the necessary components of an outstanding fishery. With prolonged snow storms alternating with periods of extremely cold temperatures, winter is progressing in a mode that has refilled Henry’s Lake and Island Park Reservoir to 85% and 70% respectively. A current snowpack of 100% of average could even increase if weather forecasts for the coming 2 months are correct.

Our summer home in winter.

Our summer home in winter.

 

If there is light at the end of the tunnel with respect to fishing it is that most of the river is now ice free and temperatures have begun to climb above the freezing level on some days.

Deep snow even along the lower river will continue to complicate access to the water, but I am convinced that the first day of fishing in the new year is not too distant. Meanwhile, I will celebrate each new storm that continues to pile snow deep in the high country. This is like money in the bank for anyone who understands the importance of a big winter in sustaining the sport we love and the elements that support it. Spring will eventually come and all discomfort of winter will be quickly forgotten.

Winter Hibernation.

Winter Hibernation.