Cwellyn and Tal-y-llyn – Boat and bank fishing in North Wales

In this guest blog post angling writer Wynn Davies shares his experience of fly fishing in spectacular North Wales over two eventful days, where camaraderie, breathtaking views and great fishing figure highly…

There are encounters in your life that you regret and there are encounters you celebrate.  It is always a double-edge sword to meet other anglers for the first time, especially in the close confines of a boat. To share a boat can be very unforgiving, as it magnifies the divisions and differences and can be intolerable. However, it can be one of the greatest joys and experiences that you will forever treasure.

One such encounter occurred recently, when, as part of the Monnow Rivers Auction. I was guiding Dave Smith and Lee Evans on lakes in North Wales. Two very experienced anglers and avid wild trout fishermen. It does not matter how experienced you are, it can be daunting hosting anglers of this ability, but being on familiar territory is a huge advantage.

The glorious Llyn Cwellyn

The glorious Llyn Cwellyn

The first day was boat fishing on Llyn Cwellyn, this 215 acre lake is special, as it holds wild brown trout, char, sea-trout and salmon. Admittedly populations of the latter species am unsure of, but you never know what you might encounter and it has the added bonus of being in a stunning location, After a good evening in the Black Boy Hostelry in Caernarfon and an eventful time picking keys up from the Cwellyn Arms, we were finally afloat on Cwellyn.

The boat - ready for a days drifting on Cwellyn

The boat – ready for a days drifting on Cwellyn

The lake is an intriguing challenge. Each area has its own characteristics, the roadside bank holds the larger fish, the far bank has much smaller fish. Whilst the areas where the river enters, at this time of year could hold char, sea-trout and salmon, where they might pause before they run upstream. So, you never know what you might catch, which causes a strike timing conundrum.

It was a cloudless bright day with an easterly wind so the portents were not good. We started to drift from the boat jetty, fishing the classic short line loch style, and drifted through the top end of the lake and onto the roadside bank, we did not encounter a single fish or see one rise. Even though the conditions were not on our side, we had a good wave and I was surprised that we had not risen a fish.

As we drifted down tight to the far bank, things began to change Dave and Lee started rising and catching fish, it was not the frenetic action you sometimes see in Cwellyn, they were very localized, which is unusual , as the bank usually fishes well throughout the drift.  Once the productive areas were fished, they would not fish again, it seemed that the trout were sulking in the bright sun.

A pretty wild Cwellyn trout

A pretty wild Cwellyn trout

Since the fish had gone quiet we decided to try the other bank, and yes fish were caught but they were smaller than before, which is typical of the lake, however, as is always the case with wild trout, what they lack in size they more than make up with their agility and energy. Then all of a sudden it was lunchtime, the bonhomie and laughter that ensued, is what makes fishing such a special sport, sharing great food with a nice glass of red wine on the bank of a beautiful Welsh lake is something that lingers long in the memory.

Lunch with a glass of fine wine!

Lunch with a glass of fine wine!

Dragging ourselves slightly reluctantly to the boat we finished  the drift and then decided to head back up to the top of the lake to see if we could encounter some of the lake’s other residents. Sadly we did not, though it no way detracted from the enjoyment of the day. Time had come to pack up and travel to our next location, Cwellyn, had given us a first day to remember.

Now the Llew Coch in Dinas Mawddwy is one of those no-nonsense country pubs I love, where we enjoyed great beer and food, before retiring happy and sated, to dream of what the next day might bring. The day dawned and I was high with anticipation, the lake would be, for me, something of an exploration of my past. Talyllyn or Llyn Mwyngil is a lake I have loved ever since I first set eyes on it many, many years ago, It was once one of Wales’ foremost wild brown trout waters, until it was taken over by Welsh Water and stocked.

Talyllyn or Llyn Mwyngil

Talyllyn or Llyn Mwyngil

After going through tumultuous times, the present owners are committed to restoring it’s fertile 220 acres as a wild trout fishery, therefore it has not been stocked for over 4 years. To fish it was going to be very interesting and to spice it up even further it has a good run of sea-trout and salmon and had hardly been fished. I also had the joy that my son, Huw was joining us for the day, the lake has captured his heart equally.

Although the owners only allow bank fishing at the moment, they are planning to allow boat fishing and float-tubing in the near future. Arriving at the lake and having a reconnoiter, two problems immediately become apparent, there are areas of the lake that has a significant weed problem, and the farmer on the far bank has erected  fence with double barbed wire, to within a yard of the waters edges. Not ideal but not insurmountable.

As the near bank borders the road we braved the far bank, climbing gingerly over the barbed wire, as one slip meant a ruined pair of waders, we walked down the bank to the areas Huw and I knew to be very productive, when it was a wild fishery.  As the day was cloudy with the occasional squall, I had a good feeling in my bones and so it proved. Dave, Lee and Huw were catching , with fish to 1 ½lb coming to the net.

Dave casting his line on Tal-y-llyn

Dave casting his line on Tal-y-llyn

As lunchtime beckoned, Lee gave a huge shout and the reason was all too apparent, his rod had a mighty bend. We rushed over to watch the battle, it was a great fish, Lee after a few anxious moments with the fish diving into the weed, finally netted a super fit wild brown trout of just 1oz short of 4lb, which was released with a flourish.

A superb wild trout from tal-y-llyn

A superb wild trout from tal-y-llyn

There was only one thing to do after such a great capture and that was to break for lunch. There is nothing and I mean nothing, that gives pleasure as much as like minded people enjoying beautiful scenery, and toasting the capture of a beautiful brown trout with a glass of red wine.

Lunch finished we resumed fishing and caught fish, but decided to pack up early as there was a long drive ahead.  For me it was a special weekend, met two great people, fished with my son, encountered superb wild fish and laughed, it does not get much better than that.

As for the flies we used they were mainly, Daddy Longlegs, Red Arsed Kate Hoppers, Sedgehogs and a Dirty Filthy Sooty (one of Dave’s flies), most tinged with some claret in the body. Fished on the surface they worked on both lakes, especially on Talyllyn, as with the weed present it would have been foolish to go sub-surface.

Author: Wynn Davies

Happiness personified - Lee Evans with a Tal-y-llyn special

Happiness personified – Lee Evans with a special Tal-y-llyn trout

Fly Fishing In Iceland

Fly fishing in Iceland – probably the best trout and char fishing destination in the northern hemisphere! This blog by Ceri Thomas will give you an idea of the quality of fishing available. Read on to discover fishing in Iceland…

Fly fishing in Iceland under a waterfall

Fly fishing in Iceland under a waterfall

In July of 2019 myself and Tim Hughes of Airflo visited the volcanic wilderness of Iceland in search of brown trout and Arctic char. Our trip was arranged with Fishpartner and involved four days of hardcore fishing on several lakes, plus two highland rivers, the Kaldakvisl and Tungnaa.  As well as the usual array of Airflo fishing tackle, we took along a wide selection of Fulling Mill flies, knowing that their durability and fish catching prowess were without equal.

Playing a fish on lake Villingavatn

Playing a fish on lake Villingavatn

On the afternoon of day one, we fished a small lake called Villingavatn, where the trout were incredibly fit and beautiful. We observed many large fish feeding in this lake on sticklebacks, so we imitated these with Fulling Mill lite-brite minnow patterns to great success. It was necessary to make long casts with our Airflo SuperFlo lines beyond a weed line, but once in the taking zone the hits were incredibly savage, with every single fish taking us well into the backing. The average size of the butter gold trout we caught were not far off 60cm – but apparently these were just the smaller ones in the lake!

A fine Icelandic brown trout for Tim Hughes

A fine Icelandic brown trout for Tim Hughes

On day two we fished the vast Lake Ulfljotsvatn, which produced numerous hard fighting char up to 50 cm to nymphs fished under a strike indicator in a deep water channel.  Favourite Fulling Mill flies of the day included the traffic light buzzer and the Czech weapon, a pattern that really picked out the better fish.

Lake Sogid, Iceland

Lake Ulfljotsvatn, Iceland

Lake Sogid char - hard fighting fish!

Lake Sogid char – hard fighting fish!

We spent the evening of day two and then the next two full days fishing out of the luxurious Fishpartner Highland lodge on their rivers, the majestic Kaldakvisl and Tungnaa, where we put in some seriously long hours on the water.

Day three we spent entirely on the Kaldakvisl, with its stunning waterfalls and rocky pools and runs. Here our favoured method was to fish two flies under an Air-lok bung. The Czech weapon nymph with its red tag was once again picked out repeatedly by the char.

The mouth of the Kaldakvisl - Os'

The mouth of the Kaldakvisl – Os’

A char from the kaldakvisl river

A char from the kaldakvisl river

We also had some great fishing with big, black streamers, with fish after fish hitting these flies hard when stripped back across the river mouth where it entered a glacial lake. It is no exaggeration to say we landed vast quantities of char from the Kaldakvisl, far more than we ever thought possible. Many were between 40 and 52 cm and were the most beautiful fish we had ever seen. We also captured some incredible trout to over 50 cm.

Our final day was spent on the Tungnaa, a gin clear river that in its upper reaches flowed through what appeared to be an alien landscape, complete with volcanic canyons and lurid green vegetation. The fishing was even better – here large char averaging 45cm to 55cm abounded, as did many sizable browns, which we landed to 57cm. Even larger trout were seen and lost on streamers!

Fly fishing the Tungnaa' river

Fly fishing the Tungnaa’ river

Fulling Mill redneck barbless nymphs in size 16 fished ‘duo style’ worked a treat on the Tungnaa, especially when drifted over sight fished char.  In the deeper, faster runs we found that FM Duracell jig nymphs in a size 12 were incredibly effective – I landed 8 char in as many casts with this fly in just one run, they absolutely loved it!

Average size Tungnaa' char - on the duo!

Average size Tungnaa’ char – on the duo!

Dry fly also came into its own on the Tungnaa, with the Fulling Mill greased lightning klinks in size 18 working a charm for midge and caddis sippers.  Watching prehistoric browns slowly moving up through the deep, crystal clear water to deliberately take your dry fly was something else.

The trip was truly fantastic, and not once were we let down by any item of our tackle. The Airlite V2 fly rods and our new V2 fly reels performed superbly, with the reels smooth drag systems coming to the rescue on many occasions. The Fulling Mill flies we used proved to be as durable as they were effective; they did a great job of surviving the gnarly jaws of the numerous char and trout that we captured.

Fishing in Iceland - an incredible place

Fishing in Iceland – an incredible place

To sum up, I’d recommend Iceland as a brilliant destination for any angler looking for non-stop action in the most fantastic scenery you can imagine. We will certainly be back next year to give it another go!

Our trip was arranged by Fish Partner – visit www.fishpartner.com for more information on Fishing in Iceland.

The Season of Precision By Rene’ Harrop September, 2019

In the mountains, the change is gradual as the final days of summer weather begin to tail off in mid-August. In the meadows enclosing the Henry’s Fork, vegetation withers in response to a drying sun and the first mornings of frost. With daylight arriving later and departing earlier, fishing becomes compressed into progressively shorter periods as insect activity becomes mainly concentrated between the hours of nine a.m. and seven p.m.

September Rainbow

September Rainbow

By early September, streamflow becomes reduced to perhaps half of peak summer levels and the surface of the river becomes largely altered by the appearance of great banks of dense aquatic vegetation.

It is the effect of low water flowing over and around the vegetation that brings complicating change to the requirements of presenting a dry fly in a manner acceptable to trout that have been pressured by several months of intense angler attention.

Adding to the complexity of increased disruption to surface currents is a lowering in the average size of insects that gain attention from the trout. At this time of year, one is just as likely to be tying on a fly smaller than size twenty as one that is larger, and a 6X tippet is generally the maximum diameter that can be counted upon to do the job.

Rise In Thin Water

Rise In Thin Water

Low water with enhanced clarity commands a leader well in excess of twelve feet if spooking a trout is to be routinely avoided. And as with a leader that must perform with a high level of efficiency, performance of the line must be considered equally when precise accuracy and control become the most prominent requirement.

Complacency in rod selection can be the kiss of death when delicacy must accompany correct fly placement in equal proportion. While a four weight is my usual choice, I will often shift to a three weight to cushion a tippet finer than 6X, especially when the target may exceed twenty inches in length. It is also my opinion that choosing economy over efficiency in a reel might be the biggest mistake that can be made when the leader is fine and the trout are large.

Long Range Hook Up

Long Range Hook Up

While certainly including the most demanding of all fishing I will do in the course of a year, the season of precision also offers the most pleasure and satisfaction. It is a time when even modest success becomes a notable achievement as the big rainbows of the Henry’s Fork hold the advantage in every element of a September battle between man and trout.

Reward Of Precision

Reward Of Precision

Breaking Free By Rene’ Harrop

In the Rocky Mountain west we have trout, and we have trout because we have water. But before either can exist there must be snow, and this year there has been a lot.

When combined with frigid temperatures, a record snowfall has extended the confinement of winter far beyond what is normally experienced on much of the Henry’s Fork. Breaking free from that restraint has been a slow process that continues to suppress much of what is expected at the end of the long, cold season.

Ready To Go

Only recently have we left the period when iced rod guides, chilled legs, and stiffened fingers are not the condition of a day spent on the water. Fortunately, the improved temperature that brings relief to that discomfort has also caused recession in snow depth. Together, these elements have allowed welcome improvement in the ability to access and enjoy the river.

Starting Small

While early Baetis have yet to become a factor, small showings indicate that significant hatches are not too distant. However, small dark stoneflies join reliable midge activity in filling in for the first mayflies of the year.

Spring Brown

Spring Brown

As the water warms, productive fishing opportunity is not lost on bright days when surface activity can slow. Small nymph and larvae patterns can fill in nicely for dry flies on days that might be a little too pleasant for hatches that favor cool and overcast days.

It is spawning time for the rainbows of the Henry’s Fork and most anglers will avoid disrupting this important spring ritual. Less sensitive to the sanctity of renewing life are the big brown trout of the lower river. Pestering their spawning cousins is an act devoid of conscience but so too is the human temptation to capitalize on the visibly aggressive marauders. An egg pattern or streamers will almost certainly gain the attention of a hungry spring brown.

Watch Out For The Egg

Watch Out For The Egg

While winter remnants continue with a serious volume of snow being most prominent, it appears that we finally have turned the corner on a new season. And the freedom that comes with spring could not be more appreciated.

Jelly Beans By Rene’ Harrop December, 2018

Love them or loathe them ‘blob’ flies simply cannot be ignored!! Here American Author and fishing guide Rene’ Harrop dabbles with fishing the blob on the other side of the pond.

Fall of twenty eighteen has been a remarkable period of late season fishing on the lakes and rivers of Yellowstone country. Making it particularly special was the opportunity to share time on the water with friends from distant places, including Gareth Jones. Absent for a few years, Gareth’s visit in late September became instantly more memorable with the addition of his father, Ieuan.

Jelly Bean Brown

Jelly Bean Brown

With three days to catch up on four years of separation, I milked the opportunity of learning that always comes with this master of still waters and, as always, my Welsh friend had some new tricks up his sleeve.

From local Airflo rep Brandon Prince, I had heard of jelly flies tied with special emphasis toward overcoming the resistance of still water trout when conditions are less than ideal. Brandon had learned of an unusual tying material that can perhaps best be described as wildly colored flat chenille from conversation with Gareth at a recent trade show in Florida.

Greeted in late September by wind and off-color water, Gareth immediately began a demonstration of something so far off the scale of conventionality as to be considered bizarre. His score on Henry’s Lake dwarfed that of his companions, and this continued later on Sheridan Lake as well.

Cut-Bow On Jelly Bean

Cut-Bow On Jelly Bean

Imitating nothing, I have ever seen in nature, the fly he called the “Blob” did more damage over three days than all other patterns combined. Naturally, I fished the jelly flies left behind by Gareth to great advantage after his departure, but later on I learned that they are not limited to still water in their effectiveness.

From late October through most of November I am engaged in a quest for fall run browns on the lower Henry’s Fork. A Big streamer is my predominate fly of choice for this fishing but on impulse I decided to try Gareth’s jelly flies, both alone and as a dropper.

By conservative estimate, thirty percent of the noble browns landed over the past six weeks fell victim to Gareth’s new fly, along with a few bonus rainbows as well and though without his approval, it is now referred to as the jelly bean, simply because it is such a sweet concept.

Once again, thank you Gareth.

The Master

The Master

New Tricks for an Old Dog By Rene’ Harrop October, 2018

It is no secret that I am a man of rivers. Drawn to their mysteries at a very young age, my identity has been forged on moving water where a fly rod has been a constant companion for more than sixty years.

Stillwater action On Sheridan lake

With dry fly fishing as the primary focus, my profession as a fly tyer hinges upon understanding trout and the organisms that draw them into view as they feed on a fluid surface. Knowledge and skill are the primary components of finding big trout and then overcoming their resistance to an artificial fly. Over the decades, my comfort on the water has evolved in proportion to the confidence gained from a near obsession that demands a solution to every problem encountered. In recent years, however, a growing distraction has pulled me toward a dimension of fly fishing that forces a level of humility that I sometimes struggle to accept.

Henry’s Lake Prize

The mental exercise of probing the depths of still water has become a stimulating factor that now accounts for perhaps fifteen or twenty percent of my attention. The steep learning curve installed by such a late start in an already long life might have compelled an early withdrawal were it not for a mentor several decades younger than I.

Gareth Jones with Sheridan’s best

Gareth Jones is a still water master of international acclaim, and we fished together again just last week. Every visit from this friend of more than a dozen years has been an opportunity to learn, and his latest was no exception.

Fishing two distinctly different lakes over the four day visit, Gareth again proved an uncommon ability to quickly ascertain the requirements of getting fish in constantly changing weather conditions varying from near disastrous to ideal.

It mattered little to Gareth that cold, strong wind and discolored water wreaked havoc on Henry’s Lake, a splendid public fishery of notable reputation. He had a solution for the problems that drove nearly everyone else from the water, and the day ended with more than a dozen respectable trout.

Another Big One

On privately owned Sheridan Lake, Gareth’s still water prowess kicked into high gear in fall weather that could not have been more pleasant. For an observer, it was like watching Houdini perform magic tricks as fish after fish succumbed to his mastery.

Through each impressive demonstration, Gareth provided detailed explanation of technique along with generous access to his impressive fly boxes. At days end my brain was swimming with new information that will keep me busy on the water and at the tying bench for at least a year. I know too that the learning will continue on Gareth’s next visit, which I hope is soon.

A Good Ride

 

Big Flies – Big Trout by Rene’ Harrop

Monthly escapism to the land of the free, where the fishing is fantastic and the fly life just as good. Here Airflo fly line consultant Rene’ Harrop talks about the extraordinary fly hatches of his local Henry’s Fork.

Nature provides numerous ways to measure seasonal progress in the mountains. For a fly fisherman, however, no indicator is more reliable than the size of aquatic insects that emerge only in response to actual climatic conditions rather than a calendar date.

Green Drake Brown

Green Drake Brown

It is common to find freezing conditions and even snow as late as June and into July when the elevation exceeds five thousand feet. This level also describes habitat suitable for the biggest insect events when individual size of stoneflies and mayflies is considered.

On the Henry’s Fork, the giant salmon flies and golden stones are measured in inches and their appearance can ignite the interest of the largest trout in the river.  But like the big mayflies known as drakes, emergence at the wrong time will cause the hatch to wither if the temperature is too cold. For this reason, we know that summer has arrived when the smallest fly we tie on is likely to be size ten or larger.

Green Drake And A Beer

Green Drake And A Beer

While salmon flies have run their course for another year and the golden stones are only recently beginning to show, we are currently in the heart of drake season. Though notably smaller than the size four and six stoneflies, Green, Brown, and Gray Drakes will dwarf any of the other mayflies we will see in the entire year.

Gray Drake Spinner

Gray Drake Spinner

Whether wading or floating, the big flies create a level of excitement that has the ability to cancel the discipline of even the most responsible adult. Succumbing to this annual temptation will almost always put me a week or two behind on most obligations and I will spend the rest of the summer trying to catch up.

The pace of drake time can be exhausting when a spinner fall of Gray Drakes can appear before eight A.M., and that is only the beginning. Green Drake spinners usually arrive a bit later in the morning and emergence can stretch well into the afternoon. Brown Drakes usually favor the last two hours of daylight and that can mean staying on the water beyond ten P.M. at this time of year. A break in the heat of the day can mean missing out on golden stone action, and when all possibilities are included, fourteen hours on the water become almost the norm.

A Net Full Of Rainbow

A Net Full Of Rainbow

To make matters even more interesting, a half dozen or more minor insect happenings can be added to the big flies on any given day, and this is on the Henry’s Fork alone.

With other great waters close by and all holding their own respective magic, a fly fisher could be driven to madness by all the choices, but what a way to go.

 

Return to Still Water By Rene’ Harrop

For a trout fisherman, it would be difficult to picture a region with more choices of water than Yellowstone country. Flowing from its hub, which is the National park, are the Yellowstone, Snake, and Madison, and the Henry’s Fork lies just outside its boundaries. Smaller but no less attractive are the Fire Hole, Gallatin, and a host of diminutive spring creeks.

Hauling On Henry's

Hauling On Henry’s lake

Through the decades I have left boot prints on some of the world’s finest trout streams and my professional identity has been shaped mostly by moving water. But in recent years a different type of fishing has begun to challenge a dedication to the rivers and streams that have historically dominated my attention.

Because of elevation that rises well over a mile above sea level, the lakes and reservoirs that lie within convenient distance can remain ice-covered well into May. With most rivers open and spring hatches well underway, I do not suffer for lack of fishing opportunity but I confess to a sense of anticipation as the time draws near for a return to still water.

Sheridan Kamloops

Sheridan lake Kamloops trout

I’m not sure if the influence of my friend, Gareth Jones is a curse or a blessing, but it is certain that he is largely responsible for the distraction represented by Henry’s, Hebgen, and Sheridan Lakes. From this point forward, at least thirty percent of my fishing days will be occupied by the mysteries of still water, and this will end only when the lakes are again frozen over in late fall.

Following a master’s lead to considerable extent, a sizable portion of the flies tied in winter for my personal use are still water patterns, and I am excited to test the new ideas that come during the season of contemplation.

Why Still Water?

Why Still Water?

Though the mind state of fishing still water is in contrast to the more familiar mental requirement of fishing a river, it is no less satisfying or rewarding. I view my time on the lakes as a companion rather than competition to my loyalty to moving water and my life as a fisherman is made richer by having such a wide diversity of choice. How lucky can a man be?

Light at the End of the Tunnel – Rene’ Harrop

Airflo blogger Rene’ Harrop muses on the spring fishing that lies ahead….

Through much of a winter that seems to stretch endlessly in some years, May can exist like a distant light at the end of a tunnel.

Twenty eighteen has been one of those years when temperatures have remained consistently below normal through the months of March and April. As a result, precipitation has arrived in the form of snow at least as often as the rain that typically separates the storms of spring from the season just passed.

There are many reasons to look forward with great anticipation to the arrival of May and most if not all are related to weather conditions. Beyond Baetis and midges, spring hatches on the Henry’s Fork are dependent upon stable water and air temperatures that are consistently above freezing. This includes nearly every aquatic insect above size sixteen and there is no exception to this hard rule.

Fortunately, the lower Fork has finally moved passed the time when snow is not an impediment to accessing the water and bundling against the cold is no longer a constant requirement. It is a different story in the high country, however.

Early May is the traditional time to change my residence from five thousand feet elevation to a location nearly two thousand feet higher. In most years I have succeeded in meeting that long awaited target but this year that may not be the case.

Soon To Be Occupied

Soon To Be Occupied

As recent as late April nearly three feet of snow surrounded our summer cabin and nighttime temperatures were still dropping into the low double digits. Comparing this to the green lawn and early blooming flowers in our yard at St. Anthony is a description of two different worlds that lie less than fifty miles apart.

Trading caddis and March Brown hatches in sixty degree weather for a return to conditions left more than a month behind is tough to consider as the calendar turns to the fifth month of the year.

Early Rainbow

Early Rainbow

Right now I am thinking it will be at least two weeks until our annual move back to Island Park can be justified. In the interim, my fishing at Last Chance will continue to be a one hour commute, although recently it has been well worth the drive.

And while I stand in the river with snow still lining the banks and fishing a size twenty Baetis rather than a caddis two sizes larger, I am compelled to remember that this will change at some near point.

Spring Brown

May has arrived and before month’s end an extra-long winter will become only a memory as it is replaced by another new season that holds no bounds for a fly fisherman.

And I plan to be there for it all.

Fly Fishing Slovenia by Alps Fly Fish

Soča valley in Slovenia is considered one of the most spectacular destinations in the world for fly fishing. In its emerald waters live the mysterious Marble Trout. ALPS FLY FISH invites you to know it!

Slovenia is known to many of us by Ernest Hemingway’s famous book “A Farewell to Arms” or for being the home country of Melania Trump, the wife of the current president of the United States. But what not all fishermen know is that this small country in Europe is one of the best destinations in the world for the practice of fly fishing.

Despite the small size of this country located on the sunny side of the Alps, there are thousands of kilometers of rivers for fishing. In a radius less than two hours we can fish on alpine streams, lakes or clear chalkstream.

Some of the most beautiful are:

The Soča: Emerald waters of Soča River.

Sava Bohinjka: One of the most beautiful rivers situated next to the famed Bled Castle.

Radovna River: A wild river that goes through the Triglav National Park.

Idrijca River: Excellent river for trophy Marble Trout.

Lepena River: Pretty alpine stream of turquoise waters.

The fisherman who visits Slovenia can enjoy fishing for different species such as:

Marble trout: It is a unique salmonid in the world that is located in countries of the Adriatic Sea basin such as Croatia, Italy, Slovenia … It is characterized by its great aggressiveness.

Rainbow trout: It is an allochthonous trout that comes from hatchery. The waters of many rivers in Slovenia are repopulated continuously by these fish existing excellent populations already naturalized.

Adriatic Grayling: Are a kind of Grayling whose populations are extraordinary in some lowland rivers like Unec. Grayling fishing is spectacular in the months when there are May fly hatches.

Also is possible to fish for Brown trout and Taimen.

The Taímen is fished from November to March and the trout fishing season begins in March and ends in October. The variety of rivers to fish in Slovenia is very large so it is very difficult to determine which are the best months of the year.

Bovec town is located in the upper part of the Soča River Valley, is considered the capital of fishing in Slovenia and one of the points used for a lot of anglers as a center of operations on his fishing holiday in Slovenia.

If you want a more information about the destination you can visit the ALPS FLY FISH Facebook page or email alpsflyfish@gmail.com

Should you need some guidance on tackle for destination fishing, make sure you check out this blog post by experienced global angler Chris Ogborne!