Dave Lane on September Carp Fishing

It’s been a challenging summer for all of us, nobody could have expected that we would be plunged into a heatwave that lasted for months, and the carp fishing suffered as a result.

However, it seem to have broken now and, at last, we have dew in the mornings, condensation on the windows, and some much needed rain so things are looking up at last.

Sustained periods of hot weather can seriously deplete the oxygen levels in a lake, making the fish very lethargic but the conditions we have now will soon rectify that and the carp will once more be on the feed.

September stunner on a large baited area

September stunner on a large baited area

Also, we have the magical month of September looming and this is my favourite time of the year, a time when the carp really get their heads down and those dried up landing nets get wet once more.

Now is the time to start introducing a bit of bait and step it up over the next couple of weeks in areas of activity, which will become far more noticeable at first light.

Look for signs of feeding by scouring the lake for early morning patches of bubbles and, of course, the odd head breaking the surface. Try to feed a decent quality boilie as well as the carp will be looking for a good food source and one that is easily digested and readily available.

When I undertake a baiting program I also like to spread my bait over the whole area I am targeting, keeping the fish grubbing about and ensuring there is room for plenty of carp to feed at once.

Either use a catapult for close quarters or, if you haven’t already, try the new TF gear Airbomb for baiting at range.

The beauty of the Airbomb is that it deploys in the air and this spreads the bait over a larger area rather than just depositing in small clumps on the bottom like a spod or spomb would do. A bigger spread will give you a better feeding pattern and really get those carp tearing up the bottom looking for more.

With shorter evenings and cooler mornings, you can expect longer periods of feeding activity, but you must also pay heed to your own situation and stay comfortable on the bank. Nobody likes to be cold or wet and you cannot fish effectively if this happens.

I always carry a decent set of fishing waterproofs at this time of year and a spare set of clothes, just in case.

I also make sure I have the front of my bivvy attached at all times, just in cast the wind gets up or the heavens open during the night.

It’s weird really, the rest of the country is praying for an Indian summer and moaning already about the change in conditions, but the carp anglers are all rubbing their hands together in glee.

I like nothing better than sitting out there on a big pit with the wind whipping across the surface and huge clouds racing across the sky; proper carp fishing weather.

Proper carp fishing weather.....

Proper carp fishing weather…..

September has two other main attractions for me, apart from just the changes in conditions.

Firstly, there is the Autumnal Equinox, the point in time when we have equal day and night as the sun crosses the celestial equator. This is probably the finest time of all to be out there, carp fishing, I don’t understand exactly why, but the carp certainly do, and I have had so many bumper session on this particular week.

A big pit equinox mirror

A big pit equinox mirror

The actual Equinox itself is normally around the 22nd of the month.

The power of the moon is a mystery

The power of the moon is a mystery

The second phenomenon is the Harvest Moon, the full moon closest to the Equinox and for those of you that follow moon phases then you will already know that this is a special one indeed. This year the two events fall together so I am expecting a bumper session and I am going to spend as much time between now and then getting some bait in the water, sussing out feeding areas and, also, taking advantage of the fish starting to get on the munch…are you?

How to get kids into fishing

Fishing is a sport the entire family can share.

Fishing is a sport the entire family can share.
Image source: Bex Nelson Fishes

Bex Nelson is the inspirational angler behind Bex Nelson Fishes, a Facebook page with a rapidly increasing following. Not only a keen advocate of the sport who encourages everyone to get involved, she’s a passionate ambassador for getting kids hooked as soon as possible.

Here are some of her tips for sharing your love of fishing with children. After all, it’s our responsibility to vouchsafe the future of the sport we love by introducing it to the next generation…

Fishing is the new cool

Fishing is cool for teens!

Fishing is cool for teens!
Image source: Bex Nelson Fishes

The one regret I have in life is not going fishing when I was a child. I did a little bit of float fishing with my Uncle, a match fisherman, but that was all. Then I met my partner who has been a very keen angler since the age of 6. The first time he took me fishing we went to a lake and caught 17 fish in one day. I loved it! And this is where my passion for this incredible sport was born.

There are more people fishing now than ever before. It’s a cool sport these days. Celebrities champion it on the television – even actors like Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson loves fishing so much that he had a lake built on his farm. It’s fantastic seeing more females and children on the banks as well and I love to inspire anyone and everyone to get into fishing – there’s just so much to love about it.

Getting kids involved

Sharing the joy of fishing with 11 year old Ellen.

Sharing the joy of fishing with 11 year old Ellen.
Image source: Bex Nelson Fishes

I recently enjoyed a fishing session with a young girl of 11 years old called Ellen. She managed to catch her first fish on the surface, and as I stood back and watched her play the fish, it looked as though she’d been doing it all her life. But more important than that, her passion and willingness to learn from other anglers was amazing. She was such a joy to fish with!

Now it’s the summer holidays, there’s plenty of time to get your children, grandchildren, nephews and nieces out in the open and away from the Xbox. You don’t need anything expensive – just a good value rod and reel, a few hooks, floats, net and a mat. Get youngsters to help you prepare by making the ultimate mix of bait – kids love getting their hands dirty and will happily get stuck in!

Choose your battles

Fishing at Anglers Paradise

Fishing at Anglers Paradise
Image source: Bex Nelson Fishes

Choose a lake which has plenty of fish. In the early days, the last thing you want is to have them sitting behind a couple of rods with nothing happening. Keep plenty of bait going in to make sure you get lots of quick bites. I’ve found that even when the fish aren’t biting, kids love to get the net out and try and catch a big fish that way!

Talk to youngsters about the behaviour of fish, get them involved in reading the ‘clues’ or signs on the lake, encourage them to try and think like their quarry and explain why you love the sport. It will interest them more than you might think. Watching their passion for fishing ignite is one of the best ways to remember your own. So sit back, enjoy the view, and don’t forget to capture the moment on camera for posterity! (Check out Dave Lane’s advice on taking great photos for some top tips.)

Next time you head out with your tackle, don’t leave kids at home. Make it a family event where everyone gets involved. Kids love a competition, and there’s nothing better than the feeling of a fish on the line and an ‘epic battle between two warriors’ to teach children to appreciate these ancient creatures.

More about the author:

Bex Nelson manages the Facebook page Bex Nelson Fishes. Got a query? New to fishing? She’s more than happy to answer questions about her own journey and offer tips and encouragement to anyone just starting out.

TF Gear Night Fishing Products – Bivvy Light and Head Torch Tackle Reviews

With summer at it’s peak night fishing for carp becomes a necessity. It’s always best to have reliable lighting systems on hand for success.

Here carp fishing guru Dave Lane reviews two best selling fishing tackle products, the Night spark head torch and the Night Spark bivvy light from TF Gear.

Dave Lane Night Fishing

Dave Lane Night Fishing

The TF Gear night spark bivvy light is a brilliant accessory for night fishing. It also doubles up as a power supply for your mobile phone! In the video below, Laney explains all.

Simply the best value head torch we have ever seen. Dave Lane talks through the Night Spark head torch. Available for just £14.99.

A full range of night fishing lamps, bivvy lights and head torches can be found on the Fishtec tackle website. Check them out here.

Summer Coarse Fishing Tips: How To Beat The Heat

Summer_Heatwave_Fishing - 2

A beautiful, baking hot day; but is it still worth going fishing?
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

While blue skies and sunny waters bring out fair weather anglers in droves, high summer can be a tough time to fish. Dom Garnett has some timely advice to help you stay cool, keep catching and be kind to the fish…

The weather forecasters are grinning; the mercury is rising and the shops are making a killing on barbeques and beer. “What a lovely time of year to go fishing” says just about everyone who doesn’t know much about angling!

Ask most regular anglers, and you’ll get a lukewarm response: high summer can be a challenging time of low returns. Fish, after all, are not always comfortable in the heat. Like us, they find their energy and appetite dulled.

With clear skies and low water levels, the fish also feel quite vulnerable and will either hang around motionless or go missing in the brightest hours of the day. Unlike you or I, they have no eyelids, let alone a pair of shades to lessen the blinding glare!

Should I still go fishing in a heatwave?

Summer_Heatwave_Fishing - 3

Drought conditions can follow a heatwave. It can be a time of stress and difficulty for nature- and fish become more vulnerable. Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

When it’s extremely hot, fishing can be a tricky business. That’s not to say you won’t catch, but you might need to switch times, locations or species. Early mornings or evenings are going to be better than the middle of the day, for one thing.

As for species of fish, some respond to heat better than others. Fragile, coldwater species like pike and grayling should be avoided altogether, such is the risk. Carp are perhaps the most notable exception; tough as old boots, they might slow down but can still be caught on the surface or in the margins. Tench and crucian carp are also tough cookies that can tolerate higher temperatures and lower oxygen levels.

Is it worth the risk?

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Carp are hardy fish that can still be tempted on bright days. However, on’t expect them to be on the bottom. Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

With other species, it’s a case of discretion. After all, just because you can legally target them, it doesn’t mean you should. Barbel are a point in case presently, because as tough as they look, these fish can easily die following a hard fight and a less than careful release. It can take up to 20 minutes of supporting a fish on release, if it is to recover properly.

Is it worth the risk in the first place? Only you can make that call, but when it’s silly hot remember that we have the whole year to fish. If you must go, there are some common sense rules, too. These include using strong tackle to play fish quickly, not to mention supporting them with patience to recover fully before swimming off. Our Beginner’s Guide to Fish Care has lots of great advice to help if you’re unsure.

Summer fishing and catch and release tips in hot weather

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This barbel perished after capture in hot weather. River fish demand extra care and patience on release. Image courtesy of Alfie Naylor.

  • It’s your call if the weather is scorching hot. But if the river is extremely low or you think the fish are vulnerable, why not wait a bit or try something else, like carp fishing or sea fishing?
  • Early or late sessions are often better than the middle of the afternoon, so set that alarm clock or see if you can sneak out after work! Remember though, that even when the air temperature cools, the water will still be hot right around the clock and fish can be vulnerable.
  • Pick shady spots and faster flows for the best chance of action. Fish like shade as much as we do, while shallow, faster flowing water is cooler and more oxygenated than the slacks. Hot weather can change the rulebook, so don’t always expect your quarry to be in the usual spots.
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Make the most of natural shade where you can – fish appreciate some protection from the sun. Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

  • Try fishing up in the water when it’s warm. Whether it’s a floating bait for carp, or trickling in casters for roach, summer fish often like their food well off the bottom.
  • Take extra care of the fish if it’s hot. Exhausted fish are particularly at risk, so use strong tackle and play them quickly. Keep them in the water as much as possible and support them patiently while they recover.
  • Avoid keep nets. Keep nets should be avoided, or used only very sparingly for short periods, in mid-summer.
  • Don’t fish for fragile species. Some types of fish, like pike, deserve a complete break; they are extra fragile in the summer and even if you know your craft, you could easily kill one. If it’s crazy hot, you might also avoid species such as grayling and barbel. Again, this might depend on the venue, but for the longer term it’s best that we put the needs of the fish before our own.
  • Target tougher fish. Carp, tench and crucians are all species that don’t mind hot weather and can tolerate lower oxygen levels than their stream cousins. A switch from river to lake might be more productive, not to mention kinder, if the weather is hotter than a vat of vindaloo. Of course, you should still be extra careful with your catch on the bank, because even these fish will be less resilient than usual.
Summer_Heatwave_Fishing - 1

Fish such as carp, tench (above) and crucians are more comfortable in warm water than the likes of barbel and grayling. Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

  • Pack sun block and extra water! Yes, we’ve all done it. Remembered kilos of bait but not taken care of ourselves. The result is a splitting headache or sunburn. Oh, and do treat yourself to a decent fishing hat! A broad-rimmed hat could literally “save your neck”!
  • Try night fishing for carp. If it’s a big carp you’re after, this is a wonderful time of year to go night fishing. Balmy recent conditions have seen temperatures in the high teens, even in the wee small hours! Very comfortable for sleeping out- and the fish will be a lot less wary after dark.

Read more from Dom Garnett

Regular Fishtec blogger Dom Garnett can also be caught every week in the Angling Times, while you can also find more on his site www.dgfishing.co.uk and the Angling Trust’s Lines on the Water blog.

FishSpy Camera Videos by Carpology Magazine

The latest FishSpy underwater camera videos by Carpology magazine!

Discover how a FishSpy marker float can drastically increase your catch rates by allowing you to explore and check underwater features.

In these two videos Dan Whitford of Carpology explains how a FishSpy camera has helped him on his syndicate carp fishing lake, as well as for bait checking and discovering feeding areas.

July 2018 FishSpy video

May 2018 FishSpy video

FishSpy camera’s are £129.95. They are available from the Fishtec Tackle store here.

Carp In The Park 2018

What is Carp In The Park?

The ultimate carp social. Two days of chilling, socialising and learning from the biggest names in carp fishing. Giant screen and slide shows from Dave Lane and Alan Blair, plus many more. Demos and displays from Avid, Chub, Nash, JRC, TF Gear, Shimano, Sonik and a host of other great brands. Live music, outside bar and a chance to bivvy up and socialise with the stars of carping. This is a carp event like no other and you’ll want to be able to say “I was there”!!

Carp in the park

Carp in the park

Dave Lane and the TF Gear team will be on hand to discuss and demonstrate selected products, Including the Airflo Inflatable bivvy, the Airbomb bait distribution device and the unique FishSpy underwater camera.

Carp In The Park: June 30th & July 1st, Billing Aquadrome, North Northamptonshire.

See you there!!!

For more information and ticketing visit www.carpinthepark.co.uk

Dave Lane on using the TF Gear Airbomb for floater fishing

As soon as I saw the very first Airbomb prototype all those long months ago, the first thing that came to my mind was floater fishing.

Apart from all the other obvious advantages of being able to present a spread of bait, regardless of the depth or range, floating bait presentation was the one I really wanted to try out.

Apart from close range catapult baiting or relying on the wind to drift floaters out into the ‘zone’ we had always had to suffer the ill effects of a huge great splash as our spod type devices crashed into the surface right where the carp were feeding. Obviously, this was always a major disadvantage, particularly if the fish were a bit cagy and it was always a gamble as to whether they would return and continue to feed afterwards.

Dave Lane casting the TF Gear Airbomb

Dave Lane casting the TF Gear Airbomb

With the Airbomb you can stop it in flight well short of the ‘feeding zone’ and the baits will continue their flight, landing with the minimum of disturbance right where you want them to.

Recently, on an impromptu trip to the Water Park for a breakfast with the family I had the perfect opportunity to try it out.

The fish were all cruising about behind the café on the main lake and I had all the floater kit in the back of the truck.

I simply fed the swim with the Airbomb before ordering my breakfast and let them get confident while I filled my own face with eggs and bacon. Once I had finished and the fish had cleared up most of the free offerings I was able to keep feeding floaters right on top of them and they just kept on eating them, which was the perfect scenario.

Using a heavy controller to cast way beyond the carp, I then teased it back into position and was soon hooked into a lively mirror of around twenty pounds.

That fish fought like crazy and it was a good five minutes before I got him anywhere near the net, during which time most of the feed had been demolished and the fish were starting to drift off, so I asked Dee, the wife, to have a go at Air-bombing some more out there for me while I was trying to net the fish.

Floater fishing success with the TF Gear Airbomb

Floater fishing success with the TF Gear Airbomb

Despite never having cast one before she had mastered it by the second cast and I just knew there would be another chance in the offing if I was quick.

With the mirror dealt with and the fish still having it out in the lake it didn’t take too long to get a second bite at the cherry and I added a lovely common carp of a similar size before heading for home.

It was every bit as effective as I knew it should be and I can’t wait for the next opportunity to give it a go.

Dave Lane

 

A Complete Guide to Using the Spod, Spomb and Airbomb

A great way to introduce bait accurately and efficiently, many carp and specimen anglers would be lost without their spods and other devices. But there’s so much more to feeding your swim than chucking in a load of bait and waiting for bites.

From a few pouchfuls of maggots, to several kilos of pellets or boilies, there are many ways to do it. Getting it right could be the difference between bites galore and a big fat blank. This month, Dominic Garnett and Andy Parkinson present a handy guide to using spods, spombs and airbombs to best advantage.

What is spodding?

A spod is a special bait-dispensing device, designed to be cast using a rod and line. It’s a cylindrical container with dart shaped fins for accuracy. Fill it with boilies, particles or whatever bait you’re fishing with, before launching to the area you intend to fish. Upon landing, the buoyant nose of the spod rises to the surface, tipping out its goodies in seconds. With practice, and the right gear, it can be great way to bait up.

However, we should also mention a couple of other devices here. The spomb is a great alternative. Rocket shaped and enclosed, it releases bait on impact. Meanwhile, there’s also the new TF Gear Airbomb to consider. Again, a rocket-shaped profile allows the Airbomb to reach huge distances, but this clever piece of kit is designed to open in mid-air, when the angler brakes the cast.

Whichever device you choose, the same tips and principles will apply. For example, the tackle used to cast several ounces of bait is similar whether you use a classic spomb or the latest device.

The pros and cons of spodding

Mirror carp

Andy Parkinson cradles a fine mirror carp, tempted over an accurate bed of bait at distance. Image courtesy of A. Parkinson.

So why use a spod, spomb or Airbomb in the first place? First of all, baiting up in this manner is accurate and efficient when it comes to any substantial quantity of bait beyond a few handfuls. Using a spod, it’s possible to add several kilos of bait in a matter of minutes, should you want to.

Another advantage is that you can bait up at longer range in a manner that can’t easily be otherwise achieved. Even with a powerful catapult, for example, your free baits would tend to scatter over a wide area at long range. The spod, on the other hand, can be controlled to land the same distance every cast, only discharging its contents right where you want them. And while you might be able to fire big boilies 100 yards out, the spod lets you feed even tiny morsels of bait, or those which are the wrong shape or too light to be launched big distances.

When to spod and when not to?

Just because you have the means to dish out a big hit of bait at 100 yards, it doesn’t mean you always should. Spods and larger spombs create quite a lot of disturbance when they hit the water. So when would you bother using a spod, when might you decide to leave it out, and when would an Airbomb make the best choice?

When to use a spod or spomb

  • When you can’t introduce bait by other means. For example, beyond throwing range.
  • When you’re expecting a lot of fish and want to bait up hard (a large shoal of bream or tench, or several large carp).
  • When you’re going to be fishing for a long time.
  • When fishing in deep water (8-10ft plus).

When not to use a spod

  • When you’re fishing at shorter range and could throw or catapult your feed without the extra hassle and splash.
  • When you don’t need to introduce so much bait.
  • When you’re fishing in shallow water (margin fish don’t like a big spod crashing down!)
  • When you’re fishing a shorter session (a lot of bait can take a long time for fish to eat).
  • If the fish are fewer in numbers or easily spooked.

Your decision should be guided by the situation in front of you. If in doubt ask yourself two questions: Do I need to? Will it help make the job easier?

When to try the new Airbomb

The new kid on the block has some definite advantages over its predecessors. The main difference is that the Airbomb opens above the water when the angler checks the cast, as opposed to dispensing bait on impact. Here are some scenarios when the Airbomb would give you a distinct advantage:

  • When you’re fishing shallower water or want to avoid scaring fish at all costs.
  • When you’re casting close to snags such as trailing branches.
  • When you want to loose feed with floating baits.

Equipment for spodding and spombing: Rods, reels, line, leaders

Casting a great big container full of bait is a punishing job. Sure, you can cast the smaller spombs or feeders on your usual gear. But for anything with a large payload (that’s any spod, larger spomb or the Airbomb), you’ll need to tackle up for the job. Too many fisheries have spods in trees due to ill prepared anglers!

Typically you’ll need a spod rod (or possibly a spare beachcaster or similarly tough rod), along with a meaty big pit reel. Load this with at least 30lb braid, very possibly with a 50lb shockleader. This will help take the strain of each cast without that sudden sickening breaking sound as the line parts!

Tip: When using a shock leader for spodding, pay attention to where the knot goes. To have minimal impact on the cast, it should be positioned towards the bottom of the reel spool.

Choosing and loading baits

bait for spods and spombs

Mix it up. Smaller and cheaper offerings help to stretch out more expensive boilies.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

One key advantage to using a spod, spomb or Airbomb is that they will take any sort of bait. Tiny feed particles such as stewed hemp seed, wheat or micro pellets are a piece of cake – and you can now deposit these accurately at distances impossible by most other means!

However most carp anglers these days prefer a mixed payload, which gives carp and other fish a mix of bait sizes. It depends on where you fish and the species you target too. You may, for example, want to include some baits that are too big for roach, skimmers and other fish to eat. Cost is another consideration, with most of us opting to flesh out the more expensive baits like boilies with cheaper bulk feeds (like vitalin, brown crumb, stewed wheat or beans, frozen sweetcorn etc).

In many ways, a mix of bait sizes also helps with the spod or spomb too, because smaller offerings and groundbait such as fishmeal based crumb are ideal for filling the gaps left by larger baits. In fact, a good way to avoid spillage on the cast is to top each spod-load of bait with a layer of groundbait or sticky pellets. This keeps everything stuck down tidily.

Fishtec: loading a spomb with bait

Spombs (above) are slightly different: fairly spill proof but avoid clogging the trigger mechanism.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

Spods are a simple case of fill it up and cast. Spombs, on the other hand, have a special opening and closing mechanism. They need loading carefully, so as not to get in the way of the trigger that opens everything up on impact with the water. Done correctly, this makes for an extremely safe and accurate way of delivering bait into the swim (and the spomb also dives less deep and is much easier to retrieve than a spod).

Loading and using the Airbomb

When it comes to loading the new Airbomb, the principles are similar to the spomb. It’s a locking capsule, basically, so provided you don’t overfill it or gum up the locking mechanism, you can load it up however you like. It’s perfect for boilies and particles of all sizes. Here’s our quick video guide showing you how to set up your Airbomb.

The big difference, however, occurs on delivery because you empty the AirBomb before it hits the water. This is done when the angler brakes the cast by pulling back on the rod. This activates the trigger to open the capsule, releasing the bait in a controlled manner.

With practice you can get wicked accuracy and some different effects. You can release just over the water to land your feed quite tightly, for example, or higher in the air for a wider spread of bait. Indeed, on a lot of busy fisheries the carp can grow a little wary of super concentrated beds of bait.

How do I know which baiting device is right for me?

This could depend on several factors. The spod is simple and effective for great distances and deep water. The spomb is tidier though – and smaller ones are great for anglers who don’t want to fork out for a special extra rod. As for the Airbomb – well, you just have to try it! It’s a great way to deliver a large payload with the least noise and water disturbance – and it will easily fire bait into tricky areas under trees or other tight spots.

Don’t discount old school catapults and other baiting methods though; if your fishing tends to be shorter range, no problem. Our recent blog on feeding methods is well worth a look here!

Casting out with a spod, spomb or Airbomb

Fishtec: casting a spomb

Preparing to launch a spomb – smaller models can be cast on regular gear without needing an extra rod.
Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

So you’re all tackled up and ready to cast out. What happens next? Well, the first cast or two can be where mistakes happen, so take time to prepare. Firstly, if you’re using braid, it will really help to wet your reel spool. Dry braid is more prone to catching the wind and tangling, so you want it to behave itself.

Start then, by casting an empty spod or spomb just thirty or forty yards and then literally dunking the reel in the water as you reel in under tension. This will help to get the braid damp and sitting cleanly on the spool. Even with mono, it’s worth making a couple of smoother, shorter casts and reeling in, just to ensure your line is laying evenly.

As for the actual cast, it’s a case of keeping it smooth and controlled. There should generally be around half a rod length “drop” between the spod or spomb and the end of the rod. Try to come straight overhead with power but no sudden jerk of force. In many ways, the cast is very similar to casting out a rig with a heavy PVA bag attached – smoothly does it! If anything, you can aim a little higher if you’re casting a spomb, because you want it to land nose first and open cleanly on landing. Of course, if you’re using an Airbomb you’ll want a more direct cast which you’ll need to “break” just before the area you want to target. The Airbomb will open mid-air and fire your bait into the desired spot.

To get your casts to land the same distance each time, you could measure the distance and use the line clip on your reel. Many anglers will literally pace out the distances on dry land. Simply walk in a line along the ground, or use two sticks as distance markers. This way, you can be sure that your spods of bait travel the exact same distance as your baited rigs. That said, you may want to allow slightly more distance to your rig because it will sink to the bottom, while your spod or spomb won’t.

Tip: Feather it down!

It’s easy just to lob out a spod and watch it go splat on the water. However, to make a little less commotion and prevent it from diving far under the surface on impact, try “feathering” the cast down. This simply means dabbing your fingers on the reel spool to slow things down as the cast lands, increasing control and lessening impact. It’s also a good habit to get into for casting leads and PVA bags.

Dom Garnett and bream

The proof of the spombing… one of four double figure bream taken over a bed of bait introduced at range, via the spomb. Image courtesy of Dom Garnett.

For a quick, simple and visual guide to spodding use our infographic below:

Fishtec spodding infographic

The TF Gear Airbomb – Dave Lane Q & A Session With Total Carp Magazine

In this article by Total Carp Magazine Dave Lane answers some TF Gear Airbomb questions….


TOTAL CARP: WHAT WAS THE THOUGHT PROCESS BEHIND PRODUCING THE AIRBOMB?

DAVE LANE: To create a system that could bait a swim in a similar method to a catapult but at any range, rather than just deposit small piles of bait on the bottom of the lake.

In shallow water this is even more pronounced when you are using a spod or similar type of device as the bait has no time to spread out on its descent.

The Airbomb will scatter your bait in a wider pattern and actually create a feeding area rather than individual spots that are impossible to accurately land a rig on top of.

TC: HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN IN TESTING?

DL: I suppose it must be around two years now, since we had the original samples made. Throughout that process we have made a few changes and tweaks to ensure that it performs exactly as we intended at the outset.

Everything was kept under wraps for a long time as we were always aware of just how good this device would be and we wanted to perfect every aspect of it before releasing it to the angling public.

TC: WHEN IS IT AVAILABLE?

DL: It will be available around the end of March this year.

TC: DO YOU SEE ANY LIMITATIONS?

DL: Not really, no. In fact there are quite a few ways you can use the Airbomb to create different baiting patterns.

If you hit the line clip high in the air while the Bomb is still climbing then the bait will spread in a larger circle on impact with the water.

Alternatively, you can adjust your line clip to stop the Airbomb nearer the surface, on its descent, and this will fire the bait in a smaller, more compact pattern.

If you are fishing on very small spots, like holes in the weed for example, you can overcast without hitting a clip and the Airbomb will not open on impact. By doing this you still have the bait inside and if you carefully wind the Bomb into position you can then flick the rod tip and deliver the bait from the surface into the hole in the weed, or whatever other area you
desire.

TC: HOW DOES THE MECHANISM WORK?

DL: On casting there is a retaining clip that negates the firing pin but, on the cast, this
disengages.

The Airbomb is triggered by a sudden force on the line, provided by the line clip on your reel or trapping the line with your finger.

The Airbomb then opens and stops in mid-air while your bait carries on under its own inertia for a short distance before falling into the lake. Because the Airbomb is empty it now has very little weight and makes a minimal splash as it hits the water, but the real beauty
is that the Airbomb falls about 20 yards back from your spot and doesn’t spook feeding fish.

Airbomb projects bait forward over your marker

Airbomb projects bait forward over your marker

TC: WHAT RANGES ARE YOU COMFORTABLE FISHING THE AIRBOMB OR IS IT PURELY DOWN TO THE ANGLER’S ABILITY?

DL: I would be comfortable fishing at any range at all, as long as I could hit the line clip while the Airbomb is still in flight.

Casting ability will figure in the same way it would with a very good spod or similar device.

The Airbomb has an extremely aerodynamic profile and the four finned flight at the back ensures that it stays stable and flies true through the air.

TC: IF YOU WERE  FISHING AN AREA AT SAY 80 YARDS,WHERE WOULD YOU SET THE CLIP AND WRAP THE ROD TO ENSURE YOU BAITED THE AREA ACCURATELY?

DL: This would vary depending on the weight, shape and profile of the bait you were using because 18mm boilies will fly on a lot further than sweetcorn, for example.

As a rough guide I would say about  two rod lengths shorter for particles and three rod lengths for boilies, but a simple test cast with a very small amount of bait will soon give you the range and you can easily tweak this until you have it clipped up perfectly.

TC: FISHING LARGE SPREADS OF BAITS IS OFTEN ASSOCIATED WITH BOILIE FISHING; WOULD YOU USE THIS BAITING DEVICE WITH OTHER BAITS SUCH AS PELLETS OR PARTICLES?

DL: I totally disagree with that,actually; I always fish particles in a nice wide pattern so that I can get more fish feeding in the area at the same time.

If I was to go out in a boat to bait up then I wouldn’t dream of just upending a bucket over the side, I would scatter it around my mark with a scoop and this is the effect that the Airbomb will give you.

Remember that you can vary the spread easily by the timing of the ejection against the line clip. I can see huge advantages for fishing particles with an Airbomb as there is no other way at the moment of creating that ‘catapult like spread’ at range.

Airbomb can be used with a wide variety of baits

Airbomb can be used with a wide variety of baits

TC: IN WHAT SITUATIONS CAN YOU SEE YOURSELF USING THE AIRBOMB?

DL: Apart from fishing my own margins, where I can bait by hand, I cannot honestly think of any situation where I wouldn’t use one.

Throwing sticks have become a thing of the past because of the sheer amount of terns and black-headed gulls that now live inland and seem to feed almost exclusively on bait.

The existing delivery systems we use all have the same disadvantage of dropping piles of bait in the same way that bait boats do, and this ‘dollop baiting’ has never been a favourite
of mine but, up until now, I have had no other alternative.

Think about the implications here; using an Airbomb, not just for open-water feeding in a nice spread pattern but what about baiting tight under snags, or islands, or an out-of bounds far-bank scenario?

You can stop the Airbomb 10 yards short of the bushes and spray hemp or boilies right on the edge of the canopy, never having to worry about casting into the tree again because the Airbomb doesn’t need to get anywhere near the branches.

TC: CAN IT BE USED FOR FLOATER FISHING TOO?

DL: Floater fishing at range will be completely transformed using this device. You will be able to silently bait up right on the heads of feeding fish and the only sound they will hear is the bait sprinkling down on the surface; the empty Airbomb will be a minimal splash about 20 yards further back towards you, further still when you master the art of flicking it back on impact with the clip while still high in the air.

TC: WHAT IS THE LOAD CAPACITY OF THE AIRBOMB? ARE THERE DIFFERENT SIZES?

DL: I suppose about 30 15mm boilies would be a good fit or a decent scoop of particles, similar to a large spod really. There are plans for a small version a smaller version in the near future, possibly it would also suit match anglers for spraying maggots as well as lighter baiting for carp anglers.

TC: CAN YOU USE IT AS A NORMAL SPOD/SPOMB OR IS IT ALL ABOUT GENERATING LARGER SPREADS OF BAIT?

DL: It isn’t really comparable to either, nor is it trying to be. The whole idea is to remove the huge impact associated with both the methods you have mentioned and bait up in a more silent and effective fashion.

You can quite easily achieve the same results by either hitting the clip just before impact with the water or pulling back slowly from an ‘overcast’ past the area but, personally, I think the effect it achieves when used normally gives a far superior baiting pattern.

The spread of bait is not massive, it doesn’t just scatter randomly all over the place and, in fact, boilies of the same size and weight will usually land within a one-yard circle of each other.

CONCLUSION:

Overall this newly designed baiting concept certainly looks like it will revolutionise the baiting patterns you can now employ at range, and as with any new product on the market time will tell how successful it will become.

The angler looking to keep  ahead of the trends and take advantage of a new baiting tool will certainly see the benefits and we are certainly keen to get our hands on one here and give it a good going over.

Check out the Airbomb tutorial video here:

TF Gear Airbomb’s are available here.

Article reproduced with kind permission of Total Carp Magazine.

Top Baiting Methods & Fishing Gadgets to Feed Your Swim

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Image courtesy of Dom Garnett

There are lots of methods to feed your swim when fishing, but which is the best for your next session? From the good old catapult to the revolutionary new TF Gear Air Bomb, Dom Garnett takes a look at some of the best devices to buy and most innovative ways to bait up.

Being able to feed your chosen fishing spot accurately can make a huge difference to success. Do it right and you’ll stack the odds in your favour. Do it poorly and it’s not just bait you’ll scatter everywhere; the fish might also end up miles from your hook.

At shorter range, or for small helpings of bait, the angler can obviously throw it in or use a swimfeeder or PVA bag. But when it comes to putting a pocket of bait on a gravel bar at 70 yards, or getting free boilies close to snags, what’s the best way to feed? Here are some of the best solutions, complete with the pros and cons of each.

Feeding your swim with a catapult

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Models such as the Korda Katapult (£14.99), above, are a quick, hassle-free way of baiting up.

Catapults come in various shapes and sizes and are excellent for projecting freebies beyond throwing range. Some are ideal for small baits and accuracy; others have special pouches and thicker elastic to launch a ball of groundbait or cluster of particles quite a long way.

Pros: Catapults are cheap and with a bit of practise you can be very accurate. Perfect for short to mid range.
Cons: At longer range, catapults get less practical. Accuracy goes down and you might fall short or rap your knuckles.

TIP: For maximum catapult precision, try “locking” your arm straight and holding the catapult on its side. Softer pouches can be gently squeezed for tighter bait placing.

Feeding your swim with a throwing stick

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Old school they might be, but the TFG Firestick (£9.99), above, project boilies a heck of a long way with impressive accuracy. Do pick the right model to match your typical boilies sizes.

A favourite old school carp fishing device, the throwing stick turns you from noddy into baiting ninja… well, with a bit of practice. Various models are available and they do a grand job of peppering freebies around your baited rig. And it’s undeniably good fun too.

Pros: The baiting stick allows you to launch boilies further and more accurately than you could ever throw them by hand.
Cons: Limited to boilies and similarly aerodynamically shaped baits. Only introduces baits one at a time, so not ideal for heavier baiting up (you could be there a long time!)

Feeding your swim with a spod

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Korda’s Skyraider Spod (£7.50) is ideal for heavy baiting at distance.

The spod is a castable bait funnel that’s rigged up to a heavy carp rod (or indeed a dedicated “spod rod”). They have a fair capacity and are popular with carp and specialist anglers who like to introduce a substantial bed of bait. Although not the most subtle way to feed, the spod gets a lot of fish food out there fast.

Pros: Accurate and ideal for long distances and large amounts of bait. Quicker than most other methods when you want to really build up your feed. Works with any kind of bait you can fill it with.
Cons: Tends to require an additional, heavier rod. Creates a lot of disturbance on impact, which could scare off the fish for a while (less of a problem on longer sessions than quick trips).

TIP: Mix up some groundbait and add a little layer on top of each spod full of feed before each cast; this stops your boilies, particles and other bits spraying out on delivery.

Feeding your swim with a spomb

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Want to bait accurately at range without the hassle of carrying an additional heavy “spod rod”? The spomb (from just £9.99) is just the thing!

The spod’s baby brother, this bait rocket style device is a similar concept but delivers smaller amounts of bait more tidily. It’s just as accurate and makes child’s play of getting a decent bed of bait out there. With a trigger in the nose that makes this special bait capsule split on impact with the surface, they spill less of your free offerings mid-cast and are easier to retrieve than a spod.

Pros: You can usually cast a spomb on your normal rods, without having to pack a special “spod rod”. Easy to use and very accurate. Less disturbance than a spod.
Cons: A limited load capacity means that the spomb isn’t as quick as the spod when it comes to introducing larger amounts of bait.

Feeding with the TF Gear Air Bomb

The Airbomb from TF Gear

TF Gear’s Air Bomb (£13.99), above, looks to be a real game changer this year. The best solution so far for baiting up at distance.

Carp and specimen anglers are already getting excited about the huge potential of this clever new device. It is cast on a rod and line, much like a spod or spomb, but could well eclipse both. With a rocket-shaped profile, the Air Bomb will reach huge distances. But here’s the interesting part: these gadgets actually open in mid-air when the angler brakes the cast. The result? A lovely spread of bait without as much fish scaring commotion.

It works by stopping short of the mark to “fire” the bait forward, so there is also little risk of losing the Air Bomb. And while your bait will be sprayed a little wider than say a bait boat or PVA bag, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. This is especially true on busy waters where carp grow wary of finding conspicuously neat helpings of food every weekend.

Pros: Easy to use and casts miles. Big payload like a spod, but creates much less disturbance. Better for getting bait into and under cover of trees and bushes, as the angler stops the device short to “shotgun” the bait into position. Little risk of losing it. Brilliant for surface baits, such as chum mixers and bread.
Cons: Not quite as tight baiting as a spomb or baitboat.

The best way to see what all the fuss is about is to read our recent blog post or watch the YouTube video here.

Feeding your swim with a bait boat

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For distant or awkward swims, it doesn’t get much more precise than a bait boat, such as the Angling Technics ProCat Mk3 (£475.00), above.

Love or hate them, the bait boat is about as accurate as feeding gets without actually swimming out there yourself and delivering the bait on a tray! Critics may scoff, but anglers use them to introduce bait and position their rigs in the trickiest of swims.

Pros: Incredible accuracy, with the ability to put your rig right in the middle of the feed too. Excellent for awkward and distant spots.
Cons: The most expensive baiting aid on our list by some distance. Banned on some waters.

Further reading…

Need further advice on how to bait for success on your next fishing trip? It’s well worth keeping an eye on the Fishtec blog for expert tips and advice every month, as well as our archives. Previous posts have included our guide to Cracking Carp Baits, Dave Lane’s Guide to Particle Baits and Top 10 Ways to Feed Your Swim More Effectively.