TF Gear Carp Fishing Tackle Videos – 2017

In this blog post we take a look at some new carp fishing tackle videos produced by Total Fishing Gear in conjunction with Total Carp Magazine.

Each product is reviewed by renowned UK carp expert Dave Lane, who provides valuable insights into some essential new fishing kit for 2017. Watch on to find out more!

Flat Out Superking Bedchair – Designed to give pressure relief, comfort and support exactly where your body needs it- making your carp fishing experiences a joyous one.

3 in 1 Supersize Frying Pan – This superb non-stick frying pan allows you to cook 3 different foods at the same time so now there is no need to take numerous pans with the added bonus that you save on the washing up!

Hardcore waders – Made from the most advanced durable Heavy Duty PVC on the market with double stitching and welding on all seams plus extra layer reinforcement on the knees make these waders the toughest we’ve seen while retaining a supple flexible feel.

Response bite alarms – Loaded with premium features such as sensitivity control, high visibility night lights, silent stealth mode, vibrate and introducing a revolutionary built in torch feature on the receiver, the Response alarms have now taken bite indication to the next level.

Toastie makers – The quick and easy way to make tasty toasties and hot snacks. Super size capacity – perfect for deepfill toasties, fry ups, steaks, burgers, sausages, pies, chips, pizzas, the list is endless!

Trukka barrow – An unprecedented new standard in fishing gear transportation. A heavy duty load bearing frame complete with adjustable sides allow you to carry a mountain of equipment with ease.

Dave Lane’s Top 5 ‘Must Have’ Carp Fishing Kit

Dave Lane talks about his top 5 carp fishing essentials – never leave home without them!

1. A good set of Polaroid Sunglasses – these are essential for fish spotting, not only when looking down through the water from trees etc but also when looking out across the water to reduce glare. Location is so important that it would be mad to fish without them. I use grey tinted for really bright sunny days and amber for everything else but, if I had to have just one pair it would definitely be amber.

Dave Lane wearing a good set of polaroids!

Dave Lane wearing a good set of polaroids!

2. Binoculars – I have got right back into using binoculars for my angling. If a fish rolls at range it’s so easy to see if it’s bubbling up or just cruising past. Tiny movements on the surface can be zoomed in on and identified between carp activity and small fish or insects.

3. Tea making equipment – I just cannot function without a regular supply of tea. I recently filmed some footage for Fishtec’s website and, out of the five of us needed for filming I was the only tea-drinker! I just do not understand how people can resist it. I will try anything when my supply gets threatened; building fires form twigs when my gas runs out, drinking black tea when my milk has soured and re-using tea bags. I would even consider milking a nearby cow if I could catch one!

Tea time!!

Tea time!!

4. Good Bait – It sounds obvious but I have to have my little collection of Mainline pop-up’s in the side pocket of my rucksack and at least five kilos of the best boilies I can possibly use (at the moment this is the new Hybrid). I need to know I have a hook-bait for any situation and I even have them in differing buoyancies, sizes, colour and flavours.

5. Decent fishing clothing – I have spent so many years in the past being soaked and cold or too hot and sweating while fishing. I always make sure I have a set of TF Gear waterproofs rolled up small just in case and a decent jacket to keep out the cold, even on a summers night.

Dave Lane ‘Biggun Spots’ Q & A

When you’re fishing for these known big fish, do you literally sit in their known capture swims, even if there are fish showing elsewhere on the lake? Large carp obviously have areas where they spend a lot of time and seem to only get caught from those one or two spots, but do you think that they still travel around the lake but just don’t feed in other areas?

It is very easy to fall into the trap of fishing as others have done in the past; in fact I know I have done this on more than one occasion and sometimes suffered as a result.

For instance, if a fish is reputed to have a liking for tiger nuts instead of the usual boilie approach then every angler on the lake will, at some stage, use tigers, even if it just on one rod. Suddenly you have a scenario whereby thirty, forty or even fifty percent of the hook-baits on offer are tigers, and the chances of that fish getting caught on a tiger have just gone through the roof.

If nobody used tigers then it would have to get caught on something else, because it would get caught, they all do eventually.

The same situation arises with areas as it does with bait, those highlighted areas from previous captures tend to get more attention than the rest of the lake, more rod hours equals more chance of a result and more chance of perpetuating the myths surrounding one particular carp.

Putting back the Burghfield Common after ‘doing it all wrong’

Putting back the Burghfield Common after ‘doing it all wrong’

The other way of looking at it is that there is a reason and a truth behind the mythology, that one big carp really does only feed on the shallows, really doesn’t like boilies or does only gets caught on a full moon, but why?

Every carp must feed regularly to stay alive and it could be argued that the bigger fish need a greater amount of food to maintain their weight, so what happens the rest of the time, they feed elsewhere of course and on other things.

Certainly, I believe that a carp will use almost every part of the lake, regardless of where it is most often caught. Maybe, in the other areas it has regular food supply that does not include angler’s baits. There may be natural larders that it always visits on these sojourns away from its catchable areas. There may also be areas where a carp will go regularly with no intention of feeding whatsoever, in fact the big Common at Burghfield seems to have one of these. It is an area where it has been seen a lot but never seen to feed and certainly never on bait of any description, more like a safe area, or sunbathing spot.

To think that a carp only feeds in the spots where it is caught and at the times of year of previous captures is madness.

If it was as easy as to cast under Basil’s bush on a full moon with a yellow pop-up then that particular fish would get caught once a month, the swim would be booked in advance, the poor creature would not only be labelled a ‘mug’ but he would starve to death over the ensuing three and a half weeks.

There is always more to a situation than it first appears, if not carp fishing would be simply carp catching, and as boring as hell.

A carp is a living creature with free will and this is what makes our sport so much more interesting, challenging and ultimately rewarding than most other pursuits; the rules are constantly changing and nothing is totally impossible.

All information about a target fish is good information, it has been correlated over years by capable anglers taking notes about their own particular observations, and most of it will be true and valid. I think though, you need to add your own observations into the mix rather than blindly follow a script.

When I caught the Burghfield Common it went against all the preconceived ideas of where and how that fish would feed.

There was a folklore surrounding him that said it would never get caught in the open water areas of the lake and it would always be a loner or feed with a small band of select ‘friends’ but never with the bulk of the fish.

In fact the exact rumour was that “if you are catching carp then the next bite will never be the common”.

Well, I had it from the open water area as the second bite of a six fish catch so it’s a good job that I ignored the legend on that particular occasion.

Beneath The Surface At Bramble Mere

Fishtec marketing director Allan Crawford-Plane recently visited the tranquil Bramble Mere fishery in the Cotswolds for a quick overnighter. Thanks to a FishSpy camera Allan was able to save vital time, and importantly catch fish!

Read on to find out how FishSpy revealed what was beneath the surface in a less than clear lake….

The bucolic Bramble mere lake had long been a favorite venue of mine. Situated in the tranquil Cotswolds near Fairford, I had arranged a flying visit with just a single night on the bank, hoping for some rod bending action.

After a meet and greet with the owner Steve, a quick reconnaissance of the main lake was made. It was obvious right away that the lake was being dye treated for weed, with a blue green tint being evident.

Bramble mere

The lovely Bramble mere lake

Tactically this is where a FishSpy really comes into its own. With poor visibility from the surface, a quick cast of the FishSpy on record would hopefully give me an idea of the bottom despite the murky stained water. Several exploratory casts were made in various swims before I decided to set up and fish. I was glad I did – as you can see in the footage below the bottom was carpeted in really dense weed of several feet thick.

This presented a problem of finding a good area to lay the traps. A bit more probing with the FishSpy on record revealed a lovely marginal gravel clear spot about 10 yards out from a tree lined swim, a perfect area to add some bait. I fed in a decent amount of the new Dynamite Complex-T 15mm plus 10mm white chocolate and coconut cream – a sure fire way to attract fish. The FishSpy was then submerged on record to check the spot, as shown in the clip below.

With a nice bed of bait in place I was confident that the fish would feed near the margins – the murky water would give them security to come close in, especially with the light now dropping. The FishSpy was set on record for an hour over the spot, as the Airflo bivvy was set up and rods rigged. A quick review of the footage astonishingly revealed investigation by what appeared to be a decent common!

A cast into the area with the TF Gear 10′ Banshee carp rod resulted in a screaming run within a matter of minutes…. a nice fish now graced the net, possibly even the same spotted on camera earlier on. Would the run have come so quickly without using a FishSpy?

Carp in the net...

Carp in the net…

As the night set in several fine steaks were enjoyed on the TF gear Toastie grill. With the rods set, things turned even better that night with two runs at 2.45 am and 3.15 am resulting in two nice upper doubles.

Steak on the grill

Sizzling Steak on the grill pan.

The next morning, a quick inspection of the area revealed the bait had been picked clean. So more Dynamite Complex-T went into the spot. I had to pay the nearby Horseshoe lake a visit for a few hours, so the Fishspy was submerged and set on record over the spot, just to see. Upon returning, a quick scan through the footage revealed yet more fish activity…

A quick recast in the spot resulted in a few liners, but no runs. So without much time left of my session, I packed down the gear leaving all but my rods out. Suddenly the alarm sprung into life – a last gasp take! With Steve on hand to take a snap, a pretty little specimen ended the session on a high.

A last minute run

A last minute run

Without the FishSpy would I have caught four fish? It certainly gave me the edge for a quick visit. The moral of the story – don’t forget your FishSpy.

FishSpy - dont leave home without one!

FishSpy – don’t leave home without one!

For full details of fishing on Bramble Mere, visit www.bramblemere.com

Dave Lane Spring Carping Q & A

What areas do you target as the light levels begin to increase? Do you look in snaggy areas where the carp may go to rub up against the sunken branches to remove leeches accumulated during the winter, or maybe shallow areas that catch the sun and warm up quickest? Where do you think we should be looking for our quarry to get that early spring action?

Spring carping

Spring carping in all its glory….

The best thing about that transition period between winter and spring is that the entire lake comes back into play. Areas where the carp have not been for months will suddenly become viable areas to fish and, much more than just viable, they can be the most likely spots to get bites.

A prime example of this is the shallowest parts of the lake, particularly if they receive a decent amount of sunlight and not a lot of wind. These are areas that warm up a lot quicker with a few hours sunlight on them and the fish, when they re-visit their old haunts, always seem to be infinitely more catchable.

To my mind, fish in an area where you wouldn’t expect them to be, whether in spring or even in the middle of winter, have only gone their because they either feel more comfortable or they are expecting to find easily accessible food. Either way, a well-placed trap usually gets a rapid result although it’s not a situation where I would invest too much in the way of bait. A lot of my fishing in the early spring is with single pop-ups or just a handful of free offerings as I feel that the carp will, invariably, move back off these areas just as quickly as they arrived.

Reeds and snags can be good areas although snags, to me, are more of a safe haven at any time of the year whereas reeds are often warmer and shallower and a great place to find fish in the early part of spring.

Monks Pit has a large bed of reeds in one corner where fish will stay right through the winter. Generally, it is the smaller fish but, as the light levels increase, the bigger fish will also leave the deeper water and visit this area far more often and some big hits can be had on the right day.

I am sure that heat from the sun is transmitted down through the reeds and huge beds of Norfolk reed can create the perfect environment for carp at this time of year.

Dave Lane On Silt

Dave Lane’s no-nonsense approach for effective carp fishing over silted areas….

I suppose a lot of today’s carp anglers have started off their fishing on silt bottomed lakes, most smaller ponds and fisheries, especially the natural old lakes, will be sited up through time.
I know all of my early fishing was on either Estate lakes or ponds surrounded by trees and, usually, fed by an inlet stream of some sort. Both of these things will contribute towards a build-up of silt.

Back in the early days we didn’t really think about a lot, we just cast out and caught fish, there were no fancy carp rigs and the question of where your bait ended up in relation the silt never raised its head.

Most of the rigs cast out in the seventies and eighties, by me at least, involved a basic nylon hook-link of about ten inches and a lead somewhere between one, and one and a half ounces which, bizarrely enough, is the exact rig I would now advocate for fishing in deep silt.

We certainly never considered methods to stop the hook-baits sinking into the silt, such as pop-up’s because, after all, that was surely where the free offering ended up?

Such a simple philosophy and one born, I suppose, through lack of outside influence but like I say, still something that I firmly believe all these many years later.

The food does not sit up nicely on top of the silt so why on earth should you want your hook-bait to do so.

All the interim years spent mucking about with helicopter rigs, paternosters, slow sinking leads (made from a float wrapped in fuse wire) and various other balancing devices were, in hindsight, a waste of time really. None of the afore mentioned ‘developments’ ever caught me more carp than a standard nylon hook-link and a bottom bait when fishing soft bottomed lakes.

I will admit that the addition of a very small PVA bag of crumbed baits has slipped into my armoury on occasions but, this is due more to the want to add smell to the area than by a need to keep the bait aloft.

I don’t want to give the impression that I am happy to just chuck a basic rig into any old smelly silt filled ditch and feel confident because that is really not the case at all; there are many different types of silt ranging from clean and barely settled ‘soup’ to hard packed detritus of the ages.

If I look back at the history of some of the siltier places I have fished it is amazing just how much they have changed over the years and the sheer depth of the silt that has collected there.

I recently fished for a winter on particular Estate lake where the average depth is about three feet and, whilst there, I got chatting to a guy who had fished the lake a decade or more prior to my visit and he assured me that is was closer to ten feet deep back then.

Now that is a lot of silt but when you look at the way the lake is fed and the depth variations throughout the year you can see just how this has happened.

There is a small steam at one end that runs through a dam wall into the lake, most of the year this is either dry or just a mere trickle but, during the winter and spring, it can turn into a raging torrent. Not only does it empty the contents of the stream bed into the lake but the stream itself is fed by the run off from the surrounding fields and the water is the colour of chocolate as it pours into the lake.

So much water comes in at one go that the level of the lake can rise two feet over night and that is a lot of suspended particles to add to the silt. By the time the water floods out of the other end it is much cleaner and a lot lighter, having dropped its payload of new silt as it travels along the lake.

Year in year out, three or four times each winter, spring and probably autumn, it doesn’t take long for the build up to accumulate and the lake to lose another foot of depth.

For a while I did muck about with various pop-up and balanced presentations but, in the end, I cut the whole lot off and fished all my rods on nylon rigs, bottom baits and tiny little bags of crumb, just to add a bit of smell. I caught plenty that winter, multiple catches on some occasions, and all from below the top layer of silt.

Not all silt is nice though and I am sure that a lot of areas are not favoured by the carp because of the ‘wrong type’ of silt. Nobody likes to retrieve their leads and rigs to find them covered in stinking black ooze and, I must admit, I have never knowingly caught from these obnoxious smelling areas.

Silt that has arrived via an inlet is probably going to be cleaner than silt that has occurred through a rotting process that has taken years of decay and trapped a lot of gasses during the process.

Try dragging a heavy ball or square lead through the silt to investigate which kind you have and avoid the disgusting black smelly stuff. A FishSpy camera float is also a good way of taking a real-time look at just what you are fishing over.

The FishSpy camera float

The FishSpy camera float.

When the carp are feeding in silt they also release a lot of the trapped gasses and you can sometimes see very obvious bubblers as the patches burst onto the surface.

Occasionally I fish a small silty lake set on the edge of Thetford forest and the fish in there bubble like crazy, particularly at first light when your swim can resemble a Jacuzzi.

I have only fished there a handful of times and always caught fish but, I had always thought I should have caught more and spent most of the day chasing bubblers up and down the lake. Eventually I decided to take a different approach and, rather than chase the fish, I would try and make the fish find me and offer them more than they were getting by feeding on the natural food within the silt.

I didn’t try for a clear or hard spot, I just picked somewhere they had bubbled up that morning and then fished as accurately as I possibly could, by this I mean baiting on the exact spot with every pouch-full and marking and clipping up my lines to ensure I was not just close but ‘bang on’ every single cast. I also put at least a kilo and a half of bait on each of two spots; I wanted them to stop when they found it rather than just keep trawling all over the swim rooting for food.

The next morning was a completely different ball game and just one glance at the surface told me my plan had worked. Rather than little individual streams of bubbles popping up randomly all over, there were two huge patches of froth, one over each spot and as soon as the bites started they came in frenetic succession. I had about six fish in as short a time as it was possible to land them and recast again.

All I had done different was to give them something to home in on, and a reason to stay there once they had. My rigs were just the trusty nylon hooklinks and bottom baits but the method change had been the key, it was that simple.

I have used this heavy baiting approach to concentrate bubbling fish in both silt and weed to very good effect quite a few times since then. The most noticeable of these was on the shallow lagoon at St Ives last year. By baiting heavily and accurately I managed to put together a string of incredible captures that culminated in the big mirror known as Colin at over fifty pounds, all from very tightly baited spots.

A big St Ives bubbler from a tightly baited area

A big St Ives bubbler from a tightly baited area.

Once again, I managed to condense the feeding activity to just my baited areas but outdoing the supply of natural food.

A lot of anglers will avoid silty areas and always be searching for that elusive ‘donk’ of the lead as it hits a hard spot but sometimes you can be missing out by not fishing the areas where the fish are used to finding natural food.

Don’t be afraid of silt or weed, just find a way to embrace it.

To Infinity And Beyond – Simon Crow On Carp Fishing Gadgets!

There are lots of gadgets in carp fishing today which divide opinion, but I’m one of those anglers who embraces change, making use of the latest products if I think they are going to help me catch a few more fish.

I’m a short session angler whose time is very precious so I don’t see the point in making hard work of something if there’s a new tool which will make life easier.

Bite alarms

Bite alarm

It might seem hard to believe, but many years ago bite indicators were frowned upon by lots of anglers

When I was a lad I remember the older guys looking at my bite alarms and giving them a right slating. Now buzzers are viewed as an essential part of the carper’s kit, and there are upwards of a dozen companies making more than one model each.

Bite alarms now range from the very basic type which clip onto the line, to ones which operate with digital technology. We can now get different coloured LEDs on our alarms, vibration modes to assist deaf anglers, high and low pitch tones, as well as remote boxes which sound when we’re several yards away.

Bait boats

Bait boat

Bait boats aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, but they will certainly help you catch more fish

If I had a pound for every time I’ve heard someone slag off bait boats, I’d be a rich man. One of the best excuses I hear from the moaners is that anglers use them to put baits in unsafe areas. Well the same could be said about line in trees and carp towing cracked off rigs because someone has just gone for the ‘big chuck’!

Who’s right and who’s wrong? My advice is to embrace them both. Casting allows us to use our judgement to ‘feel down’ a lead to the lake bed, while bait boating gets rigs quietly into position without excessive casting.

Echo sounders

Echo sounder

Echo sounders are brilliant for checking the depth but not so good at finding the fish

Echo sounders get a bit of stick because, apparently, they take away the skill of watercraft. I know where the detractors are coming from with this one because the day we’re told where our target fish is swimming is the day we become trappers not anglers.

But today’s echo sounders aren’t even very good at deciphering whether an echo is a snag or a fish, let alone capable of picking out individual carp, so we’re a long way off them being a substitute for traditional watercraft skills.

I use echo sounders for depth finding and looking for clear spots, mainly because they reduce the amount of casting (aka carp spooking) needed. They’re also great when I’m on a big water where boats are allowed and even the best casters in the world won’t get beyond the margins.

Underwater cameras

Underwater camera

Life below the marker float, what a great way of checking your baited spot

This moves me onto the underwater camera, a piece of kit which is fast becoming a common sight at venues where the water is nice and clear. You can attach them to bait boats or normal boats and even floats like FishSpy which then send the image back to your smartphone.

Using them for finding fish is a hassle, so their main advantage lies in helping you check out the bottom, especially once you’ve cast out and want to know that your hookbait is sitting right.

I really rate the cameras on floats although their cost needs to come down a bit before they turn into ‘must have’ items. Just the thought of cracking off with £150 on the end is enough to stop many an angler from becoming a convert. (Editors note: FishSpy underwater camera’s are now £129.95)

Droning on

drone

A bird’s-eye view without climbing a tree
Image: Shutterstock

Last but not least we come to the latest craze – drones. Yes folks, believe it or not, carp anglers are starting to use drones with cameras to help them find fish, as well as to identify features. Climbing trees to get a good view is a thing of the past as nothing quite compares to getting a proper bird’s-eye view.

You can even leave your drone hovering in the air while you cast out, keeping an eye on your phone screen to check that the cast has landed ‘spot on’. A decent drone with a camera and smartphone app will cost about £500 and believe me it’s worth every penny, unless that is, you end up dumping it in the lake when the connection cuts out!

So there you have it, a look at a few of the latest carpy gadgets on the market. You can take or leave them – fishing will always be a sport which leaves the choice entirely up to you.

Simon Crow

Thank you to Simon Crow for permission to use these images.

TF Gear Airflo Inflatable Bivvy Latest Videos

Inflatable carp fishing bivvies are well established on the continent and are now making inroads in the UK market. These bivvies offer unparalleled ease of erection and also perform extremely well in high winds, where conventional pole bivvies are at increased risk of being damaged.

The new Airflo bivvy from TF Gear is an affordable inflatable fishing shelter that is proving to be a popular and best selling item of tackle at Fishtec. Both the 1 and 2 man versions are extremely roomy, with a built in groundsheet to help keep the insects out. They pack down very quickly into a short length bag, making them handy for fitting in any sized car boot.

1 Man: £279.99
2 Man: £329.99

The videos below demonstrate the Airflo bivvy in action:

Definitive proof that the Airflo bivvy can be inflated in under 60 seconds.

Airflo bivvy air poles are rock solid and tough; they cannot be over inflated or burst as the demo shows below. They are also highly puncture resistant and repairable.

A shorter length bag than a normal bivvy makes for ultra easy transportation to and from your swim.

For the full low-down on the blow up TF Gear Airflo bivvy, the video review below by Hassan Khan of Carpology magazine is an essential watch.

For full product specification click here.

Waders – A Carp Fishing Essential

My friend Paul Forward and I have a little saying ‘sensible use of waders’ and it always brings a smile as it was a caption used on a photograph in a magazine photograph of him many years ago, and Paul practically lives in waders.

I too am a great advocate of rubber leg wear and I have many sets of various types. In fact, I currently have a set of wellington type boots, a pair of thigh waders and some of the new TF Gear Hardcore chest waders all in a pile in the back of my truck and I rarely leave home without all three.

Waders are a carp fishing essentail

Waders are a carp fishing essential.

Our sport is a wet one but there is really no need to suffer it by getting ourselves wet and many opportunities and circumstances will require that we get into the water to one degree or another.

Using waders to hand place baits into the margins is a method that has caught me countless fish over the years, scuffing my feet along the bottom to locate cleaned off gravel spots or little depressions in the lake bed.

Baiting up by hand in the margins

Baiting up by hand in the margins.

There have also been many occasions where I could not actually fish the areas I wanted without wading out with long bank sticks and having the rods out in the lake due to the lack of actual swims.

The safe retaining of fish is another area where chest waders are a ‘must have’ item as you often cannot just sack a fish in a shallow margin and a bit of depth needs to be found slightly further out into the lake.

Even on the bank a set of chest waders can be a huge advantage, particularly when dealing with a lively fish in cold and wet conditions for photography. A decent, flexible set of chest waders perform like a set of waterproofs and keep all your clothes nice and dry and warm, allowing you to return to bed in comfort rather than dripping wet.

I mentioned ‘flexible’ because there are, obviously, different types and grades of rubber used in waders and it is important to choose correctly.

TF Gear Hardcore waders are flexible and comfortable to wear

TF Gear Hardcore waders are flexible and comfortable to wear.

A thick or stiff set of waders will be uncomfortable and eventually crack whereas a nice soft and flexible pair like the premium TF Gear Hardcore waders, will be far more comfortable and allow you to wear them for longer periods of time.

10 Great Reasons To Watch Fishing TV!!

If you’ve been watching the latest fishing series to hit the screens in the UK, Carp Wars, you’ll know that TF Gear’s pro angler Dave Lane has been putting in a strong performance!

What you may not know is that the programme was made by a new video on demand service seeking to shake up the world of fishing television in the same way that Netflix is challenging traditional TV channels – Fishing TV.  The service is available as an app for smartphone, tablet and SmartTV, as well as being available on a variety of other set-top boxes and devices, including Amazon Fire TV Sticks.

Fed up with the mediocre, lowest-common denominator programmes on TV, they not only make their own excellent shows and films, but also scour the planet for the very best fishing content available to mankind. There are channels dedicated to every major style of fishing, but in this ‘top 10’ we’ve chosen from The Carp Channel, Coarse and Match Fishing, and Predators.

Carp Wars

Carp Wars

As mentioned above, Carp Wars is one of the shows that Fishing TV have created and produced themselves, and it acts as a brilliant example of the way these guys think about fishing and how to present it on TV.

The concept is straightforward: five of the UK’s best carp anglers and one ‘unknown’ lock horns in a series of one-on-one carp fishing matches, held over 24 hours. After 15 matches the top two anglers go through to a grand final, held over 48 hours at the Etang le Fays fishery in France. Each match is one half hour episode, and with the likes of Ian Russell, Dave Lane and Ian Chillcott taking part it really is a who’s who of the carp fishing world. The series has been airing on Sky Sports, but every episode broadcast so far is available to stream from Fishing TV.

If you like this you’ll also like: Chilly on Carp 1 & 2

Carp Up Close
Join Tom ‘The Machine’ Maker as he embarks on a quest to bag himself a 40lb carp. With narration by Nick Hancock, this sixty minute documentary style film contains some great big fish action and features, among other fish, a huge UK-caught catfish.

If you like this you’ll also like: Year of the Compulsive Angler

The Tuition with Iain Macmillan
In this feature length film professional carp fishing tutor Iain Macmillan offers practical advice and answers to the most common questions that he get asked by his clients. He covers everything from spooling a reel to fish care and plenty in between. Filmed at a private lake and with lots of fish in the net over the course of the film, this is a great watch for anyone hoping to improve their carp fishing.

If you like this you’ll also like: Carp Coach – Ian Russell

Improve your Coarse Fishing with Kev Green
The title says it all, really. The sadly departed Kev Green shares hints and tips to improve your success rate when coarse fishing in this 10-part series. He looks at a range of target species and tactics, and employs the help of a few friends along the way. In Kev’s own words “The series is all about helping people catch more and bigger fish on venues they can identify with. We are targeting many different species in many different ways”

If you like this you’ll also like: Duncan Charman’s Monthly Thoughts

Fishing with Des Taylor
Des is one of the best known angling journalists working at them moment. In this 10-part series he travels the UK to target some of our most popular species, including predators from the Thames, lake pike and, crucian carp and even grayling.

If you like this you’ll also like: Club Class

Fish of My Dreams
British angler Stu Walker has been dreaming of catching one particular fish, and it isn’t one you can find in your local lake. He’s been desperate to catch an ‘Indian Salmon’ or Golden Mahseer, to give it its proper name. And you can only find them if you’re prepared to go to… yes, India. Stu and his crew head to the Himalayas, to a roaring mountain river near the boarder with Nepal, trekking for hours, camping under the stars and risking attracting the attentions of the local leopards, all for a shot at a trophy mahseer.

If you like this you’ll also like: Welcome to Africa

The Truth about Feeder Fishing
England International match fisherman Alex Bones shares the secrets of feeder fishing, from bombs to PVA, cones to cages. He enlists the help of some of his fishing buddies – the likes of Alan Scotthorne and Darren Cox. Shhhh… the secret is out!

If you like this you’ll also like: The Truth about Pole Fishing

Hunky Dory
If predator fishing is your game then you’re sure to love Hunky Dory, a half hour examination of the strange breed of anglers who are prepared to endure sub-zero temperatures for the chance of catching a musky, the pike’s north American cousin.

If you like this you’ll also like: Musky Country

Dean Macey’s Fishing Adventures
Dean Macey is best known as an Olympic decathlete, but since hanging up the his running shoes he’s been able to focus on his other passion in life: fishing. In this 8 part series he travels the UK and the rest of the world in search of new fishing experiences, whether that’s hunting monster cats in the Mekong, Arapaima in Thailand or barbell on the River Wye.

If you like this you’ll also like: The FishingTV Show

Pike Secrets 1
Want to catch more pike? Then these films are for you. Over two hours expert angler Gordon P Henricksen covers all the things you need to know to improve your pike fishing, including examinations of different lures and baits, underwater footage and hints on how to use pike behaviour to your advantage.

If you like this you’ll also like: Lair of the Water Wolf

How to watch Fishing TV:

Fishtec in conjunction with Fishing TV are giving away a FREE Fishing TV gift card with every order over £20 this month!

The card is worth £5 and will have 20 tokens pre-loaded on it with a unique code – enough to watch plenty of fishing shows.

To get one, simply place an order for over £20 and claim the card in your basket as a free gift.

Fishing TV Gift card – Free with all orders over £20