Carp Safety & Photography

Carp safety and photography is a crucial part of carp fishing which doesn’t get written about nearly enough and should be at the top of the list of your fishing knowledge. Follow my easy steps on how to get things right!

It is very simple and easy, you just need the following carp fishing tackle items out ready and set up for when you catch a fish, not all packed away to keep them dry! They don’t cost a lot compared to other items of tackle e.g rods and reels. These essential tackle items can be easily maintained for many years before needing to be replaced.

1 – Unhooking mat
2 – Retaining sling
3 – Carp care kit
4 – Scales
5 – Camera
6 -Tripod
7 – Forceps
8 – Weighing pole
9 – Bucket

Follow these key steps on setting up your carp safety and photography equipment:

1Unhooking mat pegged out in a safe area which you should have already chosen for your photos.

2– Retaining sling out, next to the unhooking mat.

3Carp care kit.  Now, hands up – how many people own one but never use it?
Please think of the Carp.  I am sure we all would like them to look nice for as many years as possible and grow to be that big famous 40lb plus carp that everyone is after.

Carp care kit

Carp care kit – use it!

4 – Weighing Scales.  Now, I understand that you may not wish to leave these outside unattended but keep them handy, perhaps by the bivvy door or under your bedchair.

5 – Camera.  In this day and age there is no real issue with cameras.  You can spend as little as £35 on eBay for a camera with a flip round screen.  This enables you to see what you are up to and speeds up this process a lot.  I have used Cannon camera’s for years and found that the G range from G2/G6 are perfect, as you can use an infer-red remote. They have recently released the G1, which has a flip out screen, they had stopped making this feature for a number of years. There are a number of other options as they have revamped the original air pressing ball that you can have under your knee, as some people find holding fish and the infer-red remote tricky and these kits come complete with a tripod adapter kit.

I currently use a G6 for the night-time photo shot and a Panasonic DT70 ( check model), this has a time-lapse option that allows you to take as many photos as you like – every 10, 20, 30 seconds as you wish.

You also need to know the distance the camera should be away from the mat and the simplest way is a peace of cord attached to the tripod.

6 – Tripod. There are plenty of options here from the gadget that screws onto your bank stick to the original camera tripods.

7 – Forceps. Not always needed, but must be handy just in case of a firmly hooked fish.  You can ill afford to be rummaging around in your tackle bag when there is a fish on the bank.

 8 –  Weighing pole. These are a fantastic bit of kit that will help you lift the fish easier and steady the scales when reading the weight.

9Bucket. You should always have a bucket of water ready and always use the water.  It stops the fish from foaming up and makes for better photos.

Always think of the fish – would you like to be responsible for a fish’s death?  Just follow these simple steps and there will be one issue for you – banking your target fish!

Just think safety first, and remember it’s not all about the perfect photo in the morning sunshine or when your friend can get down to take the photos for you. In this day and ag with the advances in technology and some practice you should be able to do your own photos.  I have been fishing by myself for over 20 years and all my fish photos are self taken and some have ended up in the Carp magazines, even night shots.

Success!!

Success!! A self take shot.

To sack or not to sack?
I feel very strongly about the use of Carp sacks to the point that I have not owned one for over 10 years. The invention of retaining slings has made the safety of Carp so much better, however there is still no need to leave the fish in there for hours.  Please think of the fish and not yourself and respect the fish as they are living things after all.

I hope the above article has been informative and will help you keep the Carp safe and sound, plus enable you to take better photos.

Tightlines Richard.