Baiting up – Carp Fishing tips from Dave Lane

As part of a series of blog posts TF Gear tackle consultant Dave Lane shares his huge experience of carp fishing, staring with some great tips on baiting up! Read on to discover baiting up – the Laney way!

When it comes to baiting up a swim, I think a lot of anglers tend to get too tied up with trying to get every item of bait to land on the exact same spot in the lake, leaving the rest of the swim devoid of attraction for the carp.

Admittedly, I am quite fanatical about the exact spot my hook-bait lands on but I am not quite so obsessive about the free-bait.

Firing out boilies, or indeed spombing them out is something that is always going to lead to stray bait but a lot of the time I am quite happy with this and, as long as the general area is hit, I know I am increasing the amount of attraction in the swim and the bait that falls in areas where it will not get eaten is not detracting anything from the effectiveness of the main spot.

If my hook-bait is on, what I consider to be, the very best spot in the swim then I know that it will get eaten fairly quickly and I do not need every single ounce of bait to be piled up on top of it.

A decent spread of bait will allow more carp to feed at the same time and create a larger area that they can home in on, bringing even more fish to the party.

A nice Burghfield mirror caught from a swim baited with a large spread of boilies

A nice Burghfield mirror caught from a swim baited with a large spread of boilies.

I think that this is where baitboat anglers miss out a lot of the time, presenting just one little pile of bait is, to my mind, fishing for one bite at a time and not really creating much of a feeding response.

If you were baiting in the margins you wouldn’t dream of sticking a kilo of mixed bait on one little tiny spot and dumping your rig right in the middle of it, as you can see straight away that you are defeating the object of the trap by lowering the percentage chances of the hook-bait even getting picked up.

Striving for perfection when casting and baiting is obviously a good thing and I try my hardest to hit the same spot every single time with the spomb but I know that I won’t, I accept this and, should I be having a particularly accurate day, when everything is landing in the same hole, then I will actually add or lessen the clip mark on the reel or aim slightly right or left to increase the spread of bait. Usually though I don’t need to as I am just not that consistent.

Different lake beds demand different approaches of course, if you are fishing on features then you may need that level of accuracy but, as I have said, if you do not think that they fish are feeding in the deeper water around the feature then the odd wayward spomb is not going to pull the fish away from your spot in the slightest, I just count the ones that hit the mark.

I regularly hear anglers cursing out loud every time a spomb sails off target in the wind or a single pouch of boilies doesn’t quite hit the marker float but getting stressed when it is not going quite right is a bit of a recipe for disaster.

I know it can be hard to keep your cool sometimes when it all feels like it is going wrong but the more you get wound up, the worse you actually fish.

We just get stressed and blame our tools instead of taking a deep breath and a cup of tea and then starting again, calmly and patiently.

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Dave Lane

About Dave Lane

Dave Lane tackled his first carp in the mid-sixties, and by 2004 had bagged five different UK fifties culminating with the famed Black Mirror. Since then, Dave has added a further three fifties to his tally. As a product developer, Dave has travelled the world to source the best tackle angling has to offer. As a writer, he’s contributed three books to the angling canon. His most recent title, Tight Lines, is available to order now.