Kieron Jenkins

About Kieron Jenkins

Born and raised on the rivers and lakes of south Wales, Kieron Jenkins won his first cap at the age of nine, fishing for the Welsh Youth International team. He has gone on to prove himself as one of the leading competition anglers of his generation, both on the river and also the stillwater scene. Specialising in nymph and dry fly fishing in the small streams and larger, freestone rivers of South Wales, he’s also a highly respected and innovative fly tier. Kieron regularly contributes quality features to online and printed game fishing publications. When he’s not fly fishing, kieron is digital marketing manager at Fulling Mill.

Back End Boat Fishing on Reservoirs – What Lines and Flies are best?

Autumn must be one of the best times of the season to get out and fish! Here Kieron Jenkins of Fulling Mill takes a closer look at ‘back end’ fishing on our reservoirs and reveals how you can make the most of this brilliant time of year whilst afloat.

When it comes to reservoir fishing the end of the season is one of my absolute favourite times to fish. The fish are high in the water and extremely active, the winds are often strong and rejuvenate depleted oxygen levels from the summer, giving the fish a new lease of life. As the temperatures drop to a more comfortable 15-18 degrees insect life increases with daddies and sedges appearing in abundance, along with daphnia blooms flourishing.

The end of the season is one of my absolute favourite times to fish!!

The end of the season is one of my absolute favourite times to fish!!

Fishing wise, you very rarely have to go below 3ft in depth to find the fish, and keeping your flies high in the water is key to getting more takes. Airflo’s range of ‘tip lines’ are tremendous for presenting your flies in the feeding zone for longer – and keeping them there – as opposed to the straight sinkers of any densities which continue to fall through the water column, however slow they sink.

What method to use?

One style of fishing which has taken the reservoir scene by storm is the washing line method. In short, the washing line features a buoyant fly on the point of a three or four fly cast, which holds your leader up on the far end, while the flies on the droppers and your sink tip line gently falls and holds through the taking zone. Without a doubt, it’s one of the most effective ways to fish a reservoir.

A victim of the deadly washing line method

A victim of the deadly washing line method

The washing line is particularly good for fishing imitative patterns such as nymphs and buzzers, allowing them to effectively ‘hang’ in the surface at a mostly uniform depth. The buoyant fly on the point either consists of a FAB or a Booby depending on the amount of buoyancy needed – If you’d prefer your flies to gently fall, a FAB is great because of the minimal amount of foam in the fly, but if you’d prefer your flies to skate across the surface creating a wake for attraction, a booby is second to none.

What Fly Lines do I need and how do they work?

The trick behind fishing the washing line effectively is using the correct fly lines, and the Airflo tip lines are without doubt the best on the market. With a range of 5 different lengths and densities -with another being added to the range watch this space – every eventuality is covered.

Airflo Super-Dri tip fly lines ready for action

Airflo Super-Dri tip fly lines ready for action

Airflo 3ft Mini Tip

The 3ft mini tip is the ideal fly line for anchoring your flies below the surface, and quickly. It features a fast intermediate tip which sinks at 1.5 inches per second, this allows you to fish extremely slow and keep them at the exact depth almost all the way through your cast. This line is more suited to straight line nymph or buzzer fishing, but can be super effective when fishing the washing line if the fish are within the top 2 ft. Personally, I prefer this line for fishing in near flat calm conditions.

Click here to check out the 3ft Mini tip fly lines

Airflo 6ft Slow Tip

The 6ft slow tip is THE best line on the market for fishing sub surface, the slow intermediate tip sinks at a rate of 0.5 inches per second and gently falls allowing you to present your flies perfectly to around 1ft in depth. Being just 6ft long the tip doesn’t hinge when sinking, keeping you in full control and in contact with your flies – if anything, it fishes more like your old floater that gets dragged down at the end. I like this like particularly for fishing sub surface and minimising any wake off the flies, a deadly line on Llyn Brenig and Llandegfedd reservoir.

Airflo 6ft Fast Tip

The 6ft fast tip is an exceptionally good line when the fish are around 2-3ft deep. The fast tip which sinks at 1.5 inches per second beds in quickly and is perfect for hanging your flies at a constant depth, it’s one of my all-time favourite fly lines for fishing the washing line as it’s so versatile. A four fly cast with two small boobies will create enough disturbance to grab the attention of any fish in the area, but quickly drop and present the flies in the feeding zone, it can also be brought back up quickly with a few good pulls. It’s a perfect alternative to the costly Rio Midge Tip.

Click here to check out the 6ft Mini tip fly lines

Airflo 12ft Slow Tip

In my opinion, the 12ft slow tip is a must have line for fishing washing line style. The tip sinks at just 0.5 inches per second and keeps you in direct control of your flies. It allows you to fish anywhere from 6 inches to 2ft in depth with ease depending on the speed of your retrieve. As much as it’s a great line for fishing the washing line, it’s all extremely effective for pulling wet flies for wild brown trout, allowing you to fish your flies just below the surface and keeping the wake to a minimum not to spook weary nearby fish.

Airflo 12ft Fast Tip

The 12ft fast tip lets you fish much deeper than the other mini tip lines in the range, the length of the tip which sinks at 1.5 inches per second allows you to really drop your flies down if you fish slow. It’s a great line for early summer fishing when trout tend to drop. Earlier on in the year I done extremely well fishing a team of 4 buzzers on this line at Rutland water, the water was as clear as I’ve ever seen it and the fish were hard on the buzzer 20ft down. The only line I could present my flies at this depth was with this 12ft fast tip, once the flies hit the depth it was a case of holding on for the take.

Click here to check out the 12ft Mini tip fly lines                

One thing that sets these lines off against any other on the market is the use of Super-Dri technology in the floating section. It’s extremely buoyant and doesn’t get dragged down by the weight of the tips and sits super high on the surface, allowing you to fish in exactly the same depth as the previous cast, as well as keeping you in as much control as possible. When the fish are high in the water you often see fish rise or bulge in the ripple, the SD technology also allows you to peal your line off the water quickly to cover them with ease, simply covering more fish = more takes.

This nice autumn trout took a liking to a FAB

This nice autumn trout took a liking to a FAB

Recommended Fly Patterns

Fishing at the end of the season means one thing, you must keep your flies high in the water, and there are 3 styles of fly which allow you to fish the washing line effectively. The FAB, Blob booby and a Mini Booby – each give different ways of fishing the method and present your flies slightly different.

The FAB allows your flies to cut through the wave quickly and settle at a pretty uniform depth throughout – My favourite has to be the Biscuit FAB as it offers a subtle, but attractive colour combination which will work for recently stocked and resident fish alike.

The Mini Cat Booby is particularly effective when it comes to nymphing on the washing line. It gives off a lot of movement with the marabou tail and straggle fritz body – but still maintaining the slim profile that may imitate anything from a small clump of daphnia, fry or a damsel nymph if tied in appropriate colours.

When there are an abundance of stockies around you simply cannot beat the Tequila Booby – If this is the case, a four fly cast with two nymphs or cormorants on the middle droppers, and two tequila boobies on the point and top dropper can be deadly. The two blob type boobies are irresistible to stocked fish.

For the dropper flies, I tend to vary them depending on how deep I want to fish. I usually have a selection of Diawl Bachs, Cormorants and Hoppers. Here’s a quick insight into fishing what flies and when.

  • Nymphs – Use them when the trout are educated and feeding naturally – They also sink quickly so great for fishing in windy conditions.
  • Cormorants – Ideal for stocked fish because of the movement. Great middle dropper patterns when fish may chase boobies or blobs and turn away last minute. These smaller more mobile patterns often result in takes when the fish have gone off the colour.
  • Hoppers – Most effective when the fish are extremely high in the surface, they imitate emerging buzzers or corixa and allow you to keep everything fishing high in the water without dropping too quickly.

    Back end fly fishing success on Chew valley lake

    Back end fly fishing success on Chew valley lake

Airflo Fly Dri Rucksack Review

Kieron Jenkins of Fulling Mill needed a portable fishing bag that was tough, reliable and totally waterproof for his fishing gear and camera. Here, he reviews the solution to his problem – the FlyDri back pack from Airflo.

The Fly Dri Rucksack from Airflo

The Fly Dri Rucksack from Airflo.

If you’re like me and fish a myriad of venues from small-waters to rivers with the occasional saltwater trip, you need a back pack which is not only big enough to take the necessities for the day, but tough enough to take anything the elements can throw at it. After much research and trawling the web, the obvious choice was the Airflo Flydri 30lt roll top back pack.

For me, one of the major factors in choosing this particular back pack was the price. The Flydri back pack incorporates features that are on par with other fishing brands, as well as being better than half the price…

100% Waterproof

The weather here in the U.K can be temperamental and getting caught in heavy downpours is a regular thing, and as a regular article contributor for various blogs and magazines I often carry a fair amount of camera equipment, it’s essential that the equipment stays dry. The Flydri back pack features a high frequency weld, boasting a unique seamless construction and a 2-way roll top sealing system which is 100% waterproof. This allows the pack to be submerged for a considerable amount of time without any leaks, perfect for those anglers prone to falling in! The roll top construction also ensures a fully air-tight seal, great for keeping out dust, sand and dirt, but also allowing the bag to float if accidentally dropped overboard.

The Airflo fly Dri back pack in action

The Airflo Fly Dri back pack in action

30lt Capacity with additional storage

The Airflo Flydri back pack has a 30lt capacity, which is more than enough to take a flask, waterproof jacket, a box of spare flies and a sandwich box. The back pack also features three exterior mesh pockets, one zip mesh pocket that features a bungee webbing (perfect for holding a fleece or buff that may be needed quickly). Adding to the functionality, a further interior pocket is ideal for storing car keys, cash or fishing permits.

Comfort, Safety and Support

To make your days on the water more comfortable, the Flydri back pack features padded shoulder straps with lumbar support, giving as much comfort as possible when carrying heavy loads. For extra support the waist and sternum straps are fully adjustable, I find these extremely useful when lugging lots of fishing tackle considerable distances. The back pack also features two reflective strips on the front and both shoulder straps, perfect for safety at night.

Additional features

When fishing from the shore on small-waters or along the coast, I tend to move frequently to new locations. The Flydri bag has multiple D-rings along the top and front panel that are perfect for attaching items such as net magnets, forceps or additional carabiner clips.

For those of you who may be in the market for a new back pack for fishing, I fully recommend taking a serious look at the Airflo Flydri 30lt Back Pack. Compared with other ‘fishing brand’ waterproof back packs that are more than double in price, the Flydri should certainly be top of your considerations.

Carp On The Fly

Kieron Jenkins of Fulling Mill talks about his summertime passion for catching carp on the fly rod – an adrenaline filled diversion when trout fishing is at it’s worst!  Read on to discover the tackle, tips and tactics Kieron employs for carp fly fishing.

At this time of year it tends to be too hot for traditional fly fishing. Trout often go deep and sulk in the hot weather, but carp on the other hand provide immense sport on the fly! Fly fishing for carp is a sport that has only recently taken off here in the UK and is becoming many anglers favoured quarry.

Most anglers who fly fish for carp in the UK encourage them to eat from the surface, but carp can also be caught on lures and bloodworms when the conditions dictate. Personally, I enjoy the surface action.

Fly fishing for carp in the UK is really taking off!

Fly fishing for carp in the UK is really taking off!

Getting started – What to feed?

Keep it simple – carp absolutely love dog biscuits. Mixers are perfect, they’re fairly large and float well. Most carp lakes are inundated with silver fish that are attracted to smaller baits, so I tend to use mixers to discourage them from attacking the bait – which unfortunately, doesn’t always work! The lovely, meaty smell of the biscuits will drag carp from all over the lake, so it’s worth spending the time to bait up, feeding small but constant amounts of bait into your swim before starting to fish. Be careful not to overfeed, carp will gorge and lose interest quickly – feed little and often. A catapult will come in handy too.

What fishing tackle do I need?

Small carp can fight, but a big one is something else. The power of even a fish 5lb + is immense, be sure to use tackle to cope with fast surges and big runs. I prefer to use a 10ft 8# Airflo Airlite Competition Special, a fly rod that was designed for playing fish hard and to cast heavy sinking lines. The 8# gives you enough back bone to hold the fish hard to stop them running into the snags, as well as great casting performance over long distances.

The power of carp is immense - a great fight on a fly rod!

The power of carp is immense – a great fight on a fly rod!

This year I’ve been using the Airflo Switch Pro Fly Reel, it has an extremely hard drag system that has stopped almost everything I’ve hooked on my local carp water. Carp often take long, hard runs towards cover, so your backing is regularly out of the rod rings! Ensure to use a fly reel that is up to the job.

As far as fly lines go, I was always under the impression that I could use just about anything and get away with it, but since the introduction of the Super-Dri range from Airflo It’s certainly helped me catch more carp on the fly, let alone trout! The higher floating properties of the Super-Dri Lake Pro fly line ensures a quicker lift off, especially at distance, allowing you to set the hook quicker before the carp has time to spit the fly out. They’re notorious for ‘mouthing’ the fly and letting go, so if you can connect quicker, why not? The non-stretch core of these lines allow you to put more pressure on the fish too, hopefully getting them quickly away from snags.

At the business end I like to use a 5ft length of fluorocarbon, attached to a Salmon/Steelhead floating polyleader. The polyleader allows good turn over with chunky flies – a splashy landing can sometimes deter carp that are high in the water. The trout version is too light, I’ve lost many large carp because the polyleader as broken, but the 24lb breaking strain Salmon/Steelhead version is ideal. A simple loop to loop connection is all that is needed to join your tippet.

If the fishing is fast and furious I prefer 10lb Fulling Mill Fluorocarbon, the leader sinks quickly and is extremely strong, allowing you to really clamp up without breakages and pull carp back through some serious snags! Other times carp can be quite fussy, especially in flat calm conditions. Then I prefer to use a lighter breaking strain – the new Airflo Sightfree G4 Fluorocarbon in 8.8lb is superb. Personally I wouldn’t go any lighter than this, but you may find you have to if you don’t get any takes.

As for flies, a dog biscuit imitation is a must. The Close Copy Dog Biscuit, Bonio Carp Fly and the Bread Crust pattern from Fulling Mill are all you will ever need. A fly that closely represents the size and colour of the real thing will always be preferred, so choose your fly wisely.

A dog biscuit imitation fly pattern is a must!

A dog biscuit imitation fly pattern is a must!

Carp on the surface

Once the carp are up and feeding all that’s left to do is to hook one, and land it of course. What I tend to do is sit patiently and spot a fish that is cruising. Carp will sit/swim high in the water if there are numerous biscuits on offer, if you can track a fish and accurately present a fly a few feet in front of it, more than likely it will eat it.

The hardest part about fly fishing for carp is hooking the damn things! They’re cunning creatures and learn very quickly. Carp will often come to the fly a ‘test’ it out, sitting a few inches under the fly, sucking it from the surface. If your line is tight or your leader is floating, the biscuit won’t move and the carp will flee onto the next one. This is where fluorocarbon comes in handy as it’s relatively heavy and sinks. The sunk leader will let the fly get ‘sucked’ into the fish’s mouth.

Once you’ve hooked one, hold on tight and clamp up that drag. More often than not they will head for cover to free the hook. A correctly set drag will save the break offs and give enough stopping power to tire the fish before getting to those roots.

Carp on the fly success!

Carp on the fly success for Kieron!

Finding a carp water can be difficult, many venues don’t mention the fact that they allow fly fishing on their website or facebook pages, so it’s definitely worth a call to your local carp fishing water to ask before turning up…

A quick re-cap to carp on the fly:

  1. Use appropriate fly fishing tackle, there’s nothing worse than being under-gunned.
  2. Cast accurately to feeding carp and try to avoid spooking them.
  3. Play carp firmly and use your kit to its full advantage. Hold them tight and get them to the net quickly.
  4. A selection of carp flies is essential. Change the colours to suit.
  5. Always check with the fishery owner that they are happy for you to fly fish.
  6. You will need an unhooking mat and a decent sized landing net with soft mesh to comply with most carp fisheries rules. Be sure to check this before heading out.
A selection of carp flies is essential.

A selection of carp flies is essential.

Fishtec/Celtic League Match 2014 Results

celtic-league-match-winners

Nymphomaniacs – League winners 2014

For the past 8 years, many Welsh anglers have been competing in what’s called the Celtic League match, a competition devised by competition anglers to get us out on the water more often, different times of the year, and fishing with anglers of all abilities. One of the best ways of anglers learning to ropes of competitive angling.

The competition is based on a catch and release basis, with your fourth fish being timed and your total catch verified by your boat partner. In previous years some competitions were being won with over 30 fish a day!

Chew Valley has been a great venue for the past two years with many quality trout being taken all throughout the year on a range of methods, fly lines and flies – A great top of the water venue if you’re looking for some nymph or dry fly fishing.

The last comp of the year was held last Sunday with favorable conditions for most of the day. A misty start saw many anglers head to Villace Bay and Woodford bank, a popular area for both boat and bank anglers and some five boats headed north towards the Dam. By 11am the mist had lifted and a slightly chilly northerly breeze had arrived, the fishing was good for the first two hours until the chill put a dampener on fly hatches, towards the end of the day there was a slight rise in temperature and the fish switched on somewhat, giving anglers a chance to get a last fish or two!

The results were as tight as always and many were keen to know the outcome. In such a competition where your final scores are dependent on each angler of the teams performance, positions can change drastically. A blank will give an angler maximum points, a disaster if the team is just a few points ahead or behind another.

As main sponsors, Airflo, gave an impressive goody bag to each angler who fished the league throughout the year, fishing reels as prizes for the first three teams, a fly rod for individual and a free fly line for each heat winner and runner up.

Teams

1st – Nymphomanicas
2nd – Team Cwmbran
3rd – Harvey Angling Margam

Individual

1st – Mark Thomas, Harvey Angling Margam

Full results aren’t available as yet, but will be uploaded when posted.

 

2014 Rivers International Report

Welsh Rivers International Team with TrophyVenue: River Ure North Yorkshire – 27th June

With 2 gold medals from the last 2 Rivers Internationals, the Welsh Team was really hoping their winning run would continue there on the wild upland River Ure. In reality though this was never going to be an easy job! The English Team were on a real high after a Bronze World position, and a Silver in the Commonwealth. “Facebook” talk was all about England claiming the one colour missing! Making the task even more difficult was the fact that most of the English Team were local to the River Ure, with one Team member being a past Season ticket holder on the actual Competition beats! Did I have any doubts? Yes I did, I’ll be honest! This would be no walk in the park, this was going to be tough – Super tough.

We knew we would have to prepare like never before for this contest, and preparations began around Christmas Time, with Terry Bromwell (the Captain) calling the lads together for a number of training days on the Rivers Taff & later the Ebbw. The ultimate preparation we felt we needed was a visit to the actual Match venue. And so it was that over the late May Bank Holiday weekend all 6 of us travelled  North, to check out the River Ure. Dean Kibble, and I had both fished the River 12 years previously as our very first Rivers International, so we had some idea of what to expect. The commitment shown by all Team members, including the Reserve (Robert Bending) was magnificent to behold. This was the BIG one, the one we REALLY wanted to win, and even though I could see that the financial costs were soaring, no-one complained – we wanted it that bad!

Actual Match week started for us on Saturday June 21st, when we left Wales in the early hours, arriving around breakfast time ready for a full days practice. What we found when we arrived was that the River had shrunk ! it was now a fraction of the size it had been back in late May. Being low and clear, the fishing was now much more difficult, but throughout the next few days, we managed to find a few methods that would catch fish fairly consistently. We covered the entire Competition beats (more than once) and we often bumped into old friends from the other 3 Nations during our days on the River.

Eventually, Match day (Fri 27th) arrived. – We had fished, thought, fished some more, drunk a few beers, tied flies, and mulled things over among ourselves. But now this was the real thing, now was the time to finally put all our plans together. I could sense the optimism amongst the guys, they (and I) really believed we could pull this off!

And so it was that at 09:45 the first session started. The sweaty palms disappeared as soon as the first casts were made, and the guys settled into doing what they do best.

I knew I had had a fairly good morning, with a 1st and a 2nd  but how had the others done?

We met back at the 3 Horseshoes pub for lunch, and it became clear that we were right “up there”with the English. Scotland and Ireland had a few poor results and we felt must have been some way behind. We started the afternoon final 2 sessions with renewed energy, knowing that this was there for the taking! The Match ended at 17:45, and arriving back at the car, I was informed that after the morning sessions, Wales were 2 points ahead of England. This was great news indeed, but had we kept it going?

Normally, asking around, you would get a feel for how the Teams were doing before the results were calculated. This was different; this really appeared to be too close to call!

On arrival back at the teams Hotel, I was invited (with the other Managers) into the room where the final results were being computed. The Team (totally fished out) were at the bar biting their nails! The 3 rd session results were announced! Wales had slipped from being 2 points in front, to being 2 points behind! The doubts were back, had we blown it? We were so close! Then the last session results were announced ! After a good last session, we had come back and we had actually tied on points with England. This meant that now, to separate the 2 Teams, the total fish points would have to be added up. This took a little time, adding to the agony but finally we were announced the winners having beaten the “old enemy” by the smallest of margins (8 fish points) or 8 cms in other words!

In fairness the other 3 Nations warmly congratulated the Welsh Team on a fantastic performance, and we celebrated well into the early hours.

I would like to thank the Captain, Terry Bromwell, for the sterling work he did from late last year all the way through to the after dinner speech! Dean Kibble, Simon Barton, Kieron Jenkins and Robert Bending – Thanks Guys you were magnificent!

I would also like to thank the members and Committee of Islwyn & District A.C. for allowing the Welsh Team use of the River Ebbw for practice sessions – This has proved to be invaluable!

Written by Paul Jenkins – Welsh Team Manager.

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Fishing the Bung with Super-Dri fly lines

The Bung is a very controversial method of fly fishing, but, who am I to judge what anglers use to catch fish? In my eyes it’s a method used to catch fish. It’s also a method I use on small-waters and occasionally the river when conditions dictate.

This method is basically a float which suspends a fly beneath, giving the angler immediate indication when a fish has then their fly. It’s a superb method on small-waters where fish are heavily pressured. Suspending a fly top, mid or bottom of the water column to intercept fish is an ingenious idea – especially when it’s fished properly – and accounts for many of the larger fish which are captured on small-waters.

A typical bung would be an indicator made out of foam, polystyrene or yarn, just like these fulling mill fish pimps. All these materials have great floating properties to suspend un-weighted or weighted flies. Another alternative would be Airflo Float-Do, a floating ‘dough’ like material which can be easily moved along the leader section to alter the depths.

How the Bung works

An idea of how the bung works

As you can see from the illustration above, there is a fairly steep angle between your fly line and fly, if a fish takes that fly, there is a lot of slack between the fly line, so a decent strike is needed to set the hook firmly. When using the bung you will see some anglers strike and not register a pull or feel the fish at all. This is due to the depth of the fly and the angle between the fly line.

One little tip I can give is use one of the new Airflo Super-Dri fly lines. The advantages of using one of these new floating lines from Airflo is the ability to lift so much more line off the water, this is due to the revolutionary Super-Dri coating. It repels water and sits extremely high on the surface, allowing less tension when lifting the line off the water than all other fly lines. This, in turn, allows for better hook up rates when compared to standard floating lines, from any manufacturer.

On my recent trip to Garnffrwd Trout Fishery it became apparent to me how good the Distance Pro from the Super-Dri family actually was. It’s a line I’ve been playing around with for a while, but it hasn’t really set itself apart from any other Super-Dri line I have used. Not until this trip anyway. For those of you who have been to Garnffrwd you may know of the ‘weed patch’ out on the far right of the lake – A submerged patch of weed, which sits just 3ft below the surface – just out of reach of most decent casters. This line has a 45ft head, and an extremely supple running line, which lets the line be cast an impressively long way.

Casting big distances with a bung is not only tough because of it’s mass, but it hinders hook up rates at distance because of the amount of line needed to lift from the surface to actually hook the fish. The Super-Dri coating eliminated this problem and hooking into fish at range becomes child’s play. The ability to throw such long distances and fish basically ‘un-fished’ water can change your day drastically, fishing over the top of this island I was lucky enough to hook and land a double figure rainbow trout on a bloodworm pattern! Check out the video footage below:

3 Great Tips For Your Fly Line

There’s plenty of article on ‘how to catch more fish’ and ‘top 5 fishing tips’ out there on the internet, but what about the simple tips to look after your fly line? These three great tips will give you an extra advantage when out on the bank.

What weight is my fly line?

First of all, let’s look at how we can determine what weight fly line you have on your fly fishing reel. We’ve all been there, wondering “Is it a 6 weight? It looks like a 7…”, this quick and simple tip allows you to easily identify what weight lines are on your reels. All you need is a waterproof pen.

Welded loops on fly lines

If you’re anything like us you hate the plastic sleeve which comes in a packet of braided loops. It’s big, clunky and get’s stuck in the rod guides. What you’ll find with this sleeve is your fly line can crack due to hinging which in time, forces you to replace the whole loop. The below method of welding loops, or lines which have factory manufactured loops pro-long the life of your fly line.

Whipping on a braided loop

If you don’t have the facilities to weld your own loops, try whipping an Airflo braided loop to your line. By using thread you can create an almost seamless joint to your fly line. The smooth joint lets your fly line be retrieved with no bumping or clunking through the guides and stops hinging and cracking near the tip of the line. As Hywel says, it’s the best way for fitting a loop to sinking lines, and it’s is also a great way of marking fly lines at specific lengths to fish the ‘hang’ more effectively!

Fly of the Week – Rhyacophila Caddis

Fly of the Week - Rhyacophila CaddisThe Rhyacophila Caddis is found in almost all rivers around the UK. It’s a free-living caddis, meaning it doesn’t build a ‘house’. The Larvae like caddis favours shallow riffles and often gets caught in the current and drifts freely downstream, this making them ideal food for trout and grayling. The ‘Rhyacs’ hatch later in the afternoon and the adults can provide some great dry fly action when they return to the water. Tying a Rhyac caddis can be complicated, but here’s a simple little pattern we’ve been using for the grayling this winter.

Attach your favoured hook into the vice, here I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph hook. Run your thread along the body to the extreme bend in the hook. Wind a layer of lead into the shank of the hook to add some weight. A tungsten bead can be used but I like these on dropper so a lead underbody is usually enough weight. With your thread, make sure you taper the body to give a slim, streamline effect and ensure you cover the lead with the thread, once the dubbing gets wet, you will get a green glow from the underbody, if you forget to do this, the lead will dampen the colour of the body.

For the rib I’ve used the tag end of thread where I first tied onto the hook. Attach two sides to the fly, FlyBox bleach dyed peacock herl is a great material to imitate the legs. Dub a TIGHT rope of dubbing onto your thread ensuring you get a thin from and back end with a slightly thicker abdomen. In touching turns wind the dubbing towards the eye and pull the side legs along the length of the hook. Secure the body and legs in place with the rib with evenly spaced turns. Tie off and add some black pen to the head of the fly to imitate the Rhyacophila’s wing bud cover.

Fly Tying Materials

Hook: Fulling Mill Czech Nymph 12
Thread: Glo Bright No12
Underbody: Medium Lead Wire
Rib: Glo Bright No12
Body: Rhyac Green Dubbing
Sides: Bleach Dyed Peacock – Chart
Colour: Black Pen

Rare, freaky looking fish caught Sea Fishing!

Long-Nose Cmaera

A freakishly looking fish which is said to live over 900 meters below the oceans surface has been snagged by the Nunavut fishing boat is only the second of it’s kind ever recorded near the Hudson Strait, Canada. 

This extremely rare and weird looking fish caused some confusion when it was actually caught but researches have identified it as a super rare long-nosed Chimaera. With so little research undertaken on this species of the Chimaera not a lot is known about their feeding habits or living quarters. It’s assumed these fish live well out of range of human contact in depths between 900 and 2000 meters. The Chimarea is not something you’re likely to hook with your sea fishing tackle!

Nigel Hussey from the University of Windsor, identified the fish as indeed the Chimaera. It was first thought that it was a Goblin shark, a fish which is equally as odd and also as rare. The Chimaera is one of the world’s oldest species of fish which goes by various names including ‘ratfish, rabbitfish, and the coincidental – ghost shark’. But they aren’t sharks. The group branched off from sharks, its closest relative, around 400 million years ago and have remained a distinct, and distinctly odd, lineage ever since and have been basically unchanged since they shared the Earth with dinosaurs.

Like sharks and rays, Chimaeras have a skeleton made of cartilage.

With a long nose, menacing mouth, a venomous spine and a gelatinous grey body the fish is one only to be talked of in spooky sea tails along side those of the giant squid, but maybe not so scary. The Chimaera is largely restricted to deep ocean waters, putting it out of reach of most fishermen and scientists. For these reasons the creature is poorly studied and understood.

Fly Tying Tips – How to tie in Peacock Herl

Even the best peacock herl strands are very brittle, so constructing a fly with a tear and rip proof body is a tough task without bulking it up too much. In this weeks fly tying tip we’re going to show you how to securely tie in peacock herl and create a great looking peacock body that is bomb proof.

This tip was shown to me in a fly tying class probably around 12 years ago, and has saved many of my flies from the death of trout teeth. Use one fly using this technique and another without, you’ll be surprised at the dramatic results.

The tutorial below is obviously just the peacock body. Incorporating this method into flies such as diawl bachs, black and peacock spiders, or practically anything with a peacock body, you’ll strengthen the body tenfold.

Want to know the best way of stripping peacock herl? Watch my video tutorial on “how to strip peacock herl“.