How To Plan Your Season Of Fishing Adventures With The Wild Trout Trust Auction

With hundreds of generous donors contributing lots from every corner of Britain and Ireland, and even beyond, the annual Wild Trout Trust Auction (8th-17th March) is a fabulous way for anglers to widen their horizons and explore fisheries which they might never otherwise be able to visit.

And, anecdotally, some super-keen participants have even started using it as a guide to help them scope out whole seasons of exciting fishing experiences.

As a wide-ranging fisherman myself (and not just on urban rivers!) I was intrigued when I heard that fishing pals John Pollard and Roger ‘Steve’ Stephens have been doing exactly this. I had to find out more, and ended up discussing how they go about planning their adventures with the Wild Trout Trust Auction…

Wild Trout Trust

Wild Trout Trust auction – 8-17 March 2019

Interview:

Theo: John and Roger, thanks so much for supporting the Wild Trout Trust Auction! How long have you been taking part, and how did you come to start using it as a way of planning your fishing season together?

John: We have been bidding and winning lots for at least 15 years – in fact I’d say it’s now just part of our annual routine. In general, we use the Auction as a way of extending our range of fishing experiences – focusing on trout and grayling beats we wouldn’t normally be able to enjoy. On the other hand, this hasn’t precluded us from being attracted to some real wild cards, like carp fishing with the WTT’s Director, Shaun Leonard!

Quite early on, we also started to use the Auction for buying overseas holiday lots – for example where a three-day package can be extended into a week by buying a few extra days direct from the lodge. This way, we’ve been able to enjoy price-competitive holidays in Patagonia, Spain, the Bahamas (four times) and Mexico (twice) with the added satisfaction that our money was going to the worthiest of all causes.

WTT Auction Bonefish trip

WTT Auction Bonefish trip

Theo: That’s fascinating… so do you have a process that you go through, to identify and prioritise your favourite lots for the year?

John: Our process is pretty simple – going through the catalogue with a fine comb to identify lots we’d both like to fish in our geographical area. As I’ve said, we usually try for new experiences, though sometimes the opportunity to go back to a beat with knowledge from a previous visit can be an attraction.

We each do this separately, before discussing a final list over a beer together, to agree our maximum bids which we work out as a percentage of the guide price. Most importantly, we also agree a rock-solid maximum spend and the number of days we want to fish! Steve then draws up a master list marked with these numbers, and we watch the online bidding, dipping our toes now and then. As bidding proceeds, we inevitably have to knock off our list the lots that pass beyond our maximum, so by the last day the list is much shorter. To avoid any screw-ups, we’ve agreed that only Steve will bid on the last day, and I have to wait for him to tell me how big a cheque he needs from me – that’s trust!  Sometimes all our budget is spent before our list has played through, and occasionally we have a few pence over. That’s when we might look very closely at the short re-entry list of unsold lots which the Trust makes available after the main Auction has finished – there’s often another opportunity not to be missed.

Steve: I won’t argue with one word of that! But I can give you some numbers too – last year, after our beer-fuelled shortlisting meeting (which we spent whittling out lots for only one fisherman, and pretty well everything north of the Watford Gap) our bidding long-list contained over 50 lots.

We were more or less rapidly outbid on over than 40 of these, and then I started to play cat and mouse with the remainder. Great fun! Right at the end, I spent the whole evening crouched over my keyboard with a large glass of Rioja, and often the bidding went right down to the wire in the very last minute. Sometimes, if we have a bit of spare budget, I do go a few quid over our originally-agreed maximum bid to make sure of landing a really remarkable lot…

Theo: So what kinds of lots have you won in the past – and can you tell us about any of the memorable adventures that you’ve enjoyed as a result?

Steve: I have lasting memories of the days when we laughed ourselves silly – notably with Shaun looking for carp on the fly, and some extra special days on super hush-hush Itchen beats. And how about the irrepressible Ivan Tarin in the magical Pyrenees?

High Pyrenees waters

High Pyrenees waters

Mentioning Ivan brings me on to food and wine: it would have been worth the trip to Spain just for the hospitality. We’ve had some notable streamside lunches by the chalk streams, too. After the importance of lunch, there’s the learning aspect too – for example, the opportunity to fish with Charles and Alex Jardine, two of the nicest guys you could ever hope to meet, and so many splendid river keepers and host-donors. And a remarkable variety of Caribbean bonefish guides, like the hilarious ‘T’ at Bair’s Lodge in South Andros (“Why do they call me ‘T’? Because they can’t spell ‘Theophilus’!”)

John: In more than 15 years, it’s hard to list all the memories of our adventures, but I’d agree with Steve – in the main, they’ve been the ones where we’ve enjoyed the company of wonderfully interesting hosts, guides and river keepers. People who shared knowledge and experience with us, that we’d never normally be able to enjoy. I am grateful that they have made me a much better fisherman as a result!

Theo: That’s so inspiring – and such a huge variety of experiences near and far. Thanks for telling us about how you’ve made the most of previous Wild Trout Trust Auctions, John and Steve, and best of luck when you’re planning and bidding for this year’s season of adventures!

The Wild Trout Trust Auction runs from 8 – 17 March 2019.

Click here to download a catalogue, or follow #WTTauction and #WTTseasonofadventures on social media, and start planning your own season of fishing adventures!

The Pyrenees and bonefishing along with other trips abroad are not in the auction but are sold as fixed price trips up to 15 April. https://www.wildtrout.org/auction/catalogue?c=t

Fishing with Charles Jardine https://www.wildtrout.org/auction/1-day-for-2-rods-river-lambourn-berkshire-guided-by-charles-jardine

Author profile

Theo Pike is a freelance environmental, fishing and marketing writer. He’s Chair of Trustees of the South East Rivers Trust, and founding editor of urbantrout.net, a website and eco-brand dedicated to the urban fly fishing and river restoration movements.

His first book, Trout in Dirty Places, was published by Merlin Unwin Books in 2012, and his manual on controlling invasive non-native species, The Pocket Guide to Balsam Bashing, has recently been republished in ebook format.

Theo now also works with the Wild Trout Trust as their Trout in the Town Officer (South) helping to boost the impact of this programme across the south of England and Wales.

Fly Fishing For Pike With Airflo Fishing Tackle – By Ben Fox

If you fly fish for pike and predator species then you need serious tackle for the job. This fishing tackle review by all-round angler Ben Fox takes a look at  the great range of predator fly rods, lines and leaders available from Airflo.

Pike have always held a fascination with me, the biggest, basest, most beautiful predator in  UK freshwater and after years of targeting them on lures, deadbaits and the like I have finally ventured into pike on the fly. But I needed some specialist equipment. Luckily, Airflo are a one stop shop for all things fly fishing, pike included and I have now found my ideal set up.

Ben Fox Fly fishing for pike on a canal

Ben Fox Fly fishing for pike on a canal

After using the Forty Plus Expert lines from my trout fishing set up for the first few months with little to no issues, I did find I sometimes struggled to get out a longer line with a large heavier pattern into the air. I had assumed, wrongly, that this was just something I needed to work on.

Enter the Airflo Forty Plus Sniper fly line. An aggressive taper, short head, big fly specialist, predator line. Coupled with the excellent Airflo Bluetooth Nano 9” #8/9 weight fly rod, the 9 weight intermediate line was a dream to handle, the line matching with and loading the rod perfectly. I also had the Airflo titanium predator polyleader to replace my usual fluorocarbon leader to the wire trace, I’ll go into to more detail on this later.

Enter the Forty Plus Sniper fly line....

Enter the Forty Plus Sniper fly line….

The Sniper line range

The intermediate is an ideal all-round line for canals and smaller waters where fishing at great depth isn’t required (have a look at the Di3 and Di7 versions if you need to get deeper) so it was spot on for my test session on a local canal. There where two main areas I wanted to look at with the line, its ability to handle big, heavy, air resistant patterns and its ability to cast in tight spots (hoping the reduced head would help with this).

First however, I wanted to get an idea of how the set up handled with a pretty standard sized fly. A 2/0 perch pattern is one that has taken some sizeable pike for me in my short pike fly fishing career. My first impressions where good, the line didn’t struggle with the size and weight of the fly and the polyleader aided the turn over as I started to cover all the likely looking spots where pike like to lay in ambush.

Casting with the Forty Plus sniper line and Airflo Bluetooth fly rod

Casting with the Forty Plus sniper line and Airflo Bluetooth fly rod

The line behaved well with both standard and oval casting styles and only requires a short amount of the head to be outside the tip to sufficiently load the rod and shoot the running line. The line had ticked my first box – it can cover the distance required with minimum back cast making it ideal for the often cramped spots you find on UK canals and rivers.

Next for the big stuff. I had with me some tandem flies tied using two 5/0 hooks joined with a clip and a good heap of flash added to that. Heavy, wind resistant, big! Exactly what I usually hate and struggle to cast. No issues, the line didn’t struggle, feel unmanageable, loose contact with the fly or fail to turn the fly over. It felt like more than a good enough match and gave me the confidence to fish the larger heavier patterns I would usually shy away from. This has led me to buy both the floating and Di3 versions of the line and it won’t be long before the Di7 joins the ranks and I can confidently target pike in any situation!

The leader:

The Airflo titanium polyleaders feature a solid welded loop, a top quality wire trace and a strong, reliable snap swivel. The wire trace is welded expertly onto the leader with minimum disturbance to the taper and provides a strong connection which you can trust to hold.

Airflo titanium predator leader

Airflo titanium predator leader

The leader material is stiff which eliminates the possibility of kinking and aids turn over, something that for most is a must when it comes to pike on the fly. The clip used to attach the flies is solid, admittedly it did take me a while to figure it out but once you do it’s easy to use and seems impossible to split, bend or break, allowing for fast changes on the bank.

The quick change clip on the predator leader

The quick change clip on the predator leader

Kinks in leaders are a nightmare for any angler targeting toothy predators and especially while fly fishing, I believe a good wind knot would put a lasting kink in any leader. So of course after I add a few tailing loops to my cast one appears right next to the snap swivel. I expect this to be game over and another leader needed but the leader had barely changed and straightened well after being unknotted. The connection to the polyleader was solid, as tested by several sizeable snags, and the breaking strain (30lb) was more than enough to pull my fly out of the various detritus found in the canal. Sadly, I didn’t get to test it on a fish on the afternoon of the photo shoot for this review but I’m sure it will handle even the biggest pike comfortably.

Too summarise:

If you’re thinking of trying your hand at pike fly fishing I cannot recommend these lines and leaders enough, combined with the Bluetooth Nano rods and a selection of pike flies you really can’t go wrong. They’ve changed my pike fly fishing!

About the author

A qualified guide and fishing instructor, Ben Fox is based in Yorkshire but operates throughout the country. An all-round angler proficient in many disciplines, quality angling coaching or a guided fishing trips can be arranged via Ben’s website here.

Ben Fox with a magnificent fly caught pike!

Ben Fox with a magnificent fly caught pike! Source Ben Fox Facebook page.

Wild Trout Trust Auction 2019

BID FOR A NEW SEASON OF FISHING ADVENTURES

IN THE WILD TROUT TRUST CHARITY AUCTION: 8th – 17th MARCH 2019

The Wild Trout Trust’s annual charity Auction is an exciting opportunity for anglers to start bidding for a new season of fishing adventures across England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and even further afield.

Wild Trout Trust

The Wild Trout Trust are a conservation charity that focuses on practical work to improve habitat for trout across the UK and Ireland.

From an expedition to a secret salmon river in Argyll, or a wild trout safari on three Norfolk chalk streams with Nick Zoll, to a choice of fishing on exclusive private beats of the Test, Itchen and Avon, the River Usk with Airflo’s Gareth Jones or gritty urban river adventures with guides like Phillippa Hake and Damon Valentine, the Auction is full of exciting experiences for everyone.

And, with around 300 lots, there are prices to suit every pocket, with a huge number of very affordable adventures starting from just £20.

Other inspiring lots include artwork by Sam MacDonald, hand-crafted fibreglass rods, special sets of flies from tyers like Lee Evans, Nick Steedman and Dave Southall, and books signed by their authors (including ‘Silver Shoals’ by the Trust’s former president, Charles Rangeley-Wilson).

A new section of the Auction also contains a selection of once-in-a-lifetime destination trips, whose donors have kindly pledged a percentage of each one sold to the Wild Trout Trust.

Some fishermen even bid for a range of different lots, and use the Auction as their way of setting up a whole season of new discoveries. It’s a brilliant way to broaden your horizons, and spend time exploring places which you might never normally get to visit, since many of the lots have been privately donated by the Wild Trout Trust’s generous supporters.

Best of all, every successful bid will help anyone in Britain or Ireland who’s interested in making a better world for our rivers, lakes and their wildlife, including our native trout.

The Wild Trout Trust Auction is the charity’s single most important annual fundraising event, which makes it possible for the Trust’s expert Conservation Officers to provide practical advice, deliver hands-on habitat improvement projects, and bring in even more match funding from other sources. The Trust has low overheads, a small staff and an ever-growing group of volunteers, so the money raised in the Auction makes a real and direct difference to our rivers.

The Wild Trout Trust Auction will run on eBay and by post from 8th to 17th March 2019.

To find the lots from 8th March 2019, visit www.wildtrout.org and click on the link, or follow #WTTseasonofadventures on Twitter

For a copy of the Wild Trout Trust Auction catalogue, visit www.wildtrout.org, email office@wildtrout.org or call 023 9257 0985.

The images below are just a taster of some of the places you might find in the WTT auction this year:

Exclusive upper Test beats

Exclusive upper Test beats

High Pyrenees waters

High Pyrenees waters

Tyne River Hill

Tyne River Hill

WTT Auction Bonefish trip

WTT Auction Bonefish trip

Total Fishing Gear Now On Instagram

Carp and coarse fishing tackle innovators Total Fishing Gear (aka TF Gear) have recently created a new Instagram page!

Here you will find the latest TF Gear fishing tackle news, as well as fish catches by high profile sponsored angler Dave Lane and the rest of the Total Fishing Gear team. With an emphasis on high quality ‘on the bank’ images, the TF Gear Instagram page seeks to  inspire anglers to fish. If you are a fan of carp and coarse fishing why not give them a follow?

Follow them here: @totalfishinggear

TF Gear now on Instagram

TF Gear now on Instagram!

Winter On The Fisheries – Iain Barr Fly Fishing On Ellerdine Lakes

With the winter now setting in it can offer some of the best sport there is! Ellerdine is one fishery I visit once the frosts and snow appears as it sends the fish into a feeding frenzy! It’s bonanza time on the small waters as the warm waters of summer are long gone. Natural food is scarce and the fish have to feed which can make them a little easier.

Iain Barr with an Ellerdine lakes double

Iain Barr with an Ellerdine lakes double

They have to feed but they’re certainly not over active and the angler has to search them down. In this blog there will be some tips to increase your chances of enjoying some fantastic winter sport, aimed at the small waters.

Before we get to the water let’s have a think about what you wear as it can be nippy out there. Layers are key as opposed to several thick jumpers. It’s not usually the main body that gets cold but the feet tend to suffer so I load on 3 pairs of socks, 1 pair being thermal, and my new TF Gear Ultra Dri boots that have an internally fitted thermal stocking.

Most small waters are not too deep so usually a floating line to intermediate line will suffice.  Despite the cold there will still be small windows of fly life activity so don’t shy away from fishing small black buzzers or small nymphs.  Many anglers simply turn up and throw a lure at them and hope for all day action. They certainly have their time and place but I catch more fish on small waters with a small buzzer and small blob or egg fished static on a floating line.  The key is static as many small waters operate a catch and release policy so fish are used to the big lures and are used to the repetitive movement of the artificial flies we throw at them.

Iain Barr with an Ellerdine Tiger trout

Iain Barr with an Ellerdine Tiger trout

I tend to use Airflo’s 6lb G3 fluorocarbon for its thin diameter as winter waters are usually crystal clear also the finer tippet allows me to fish my size 14 small black buzzers with great presentation.  With this finer tippet I use my Airflo Streamtec 5/6 fly rod giving my arms a rest from my reservoir kit which is beefed up to #8 rods.

G3 Flourocarbon in 6lb

G3 Fluorocarbon in 6lb

Positioning of the buzzer is key to get that and the egg to the right depth. I place the buzzer just 4 foot above the egg or small original Iain Barr Candy Blob. The fish will be attracted to the egg or blob but if suspicious the buzzer is strategically placed to offer a more realistic meal. In many of the small waters I have fished with this combination I often watch the egg or blob descend and will often see it disappear without seeing the fish, strike instantly! Or going the other way, the egg or blob will start to move which indicates the fish has picked up the small buzzer. This is the warning to not just cast out and allow it to sink. Good polarised glasses are paramount for this and there is a good range available through Fishtec.

If you can’t see the flies dropping the next trick is to add mucilin grease to the last 2-3 feet of the fly line to make it ride high on the waters surface then simply watch this move. A small water favourite method is to fish an indicator or bung. This is where you suspend your flies under a buoyant fly or piece of foam and watch this dip under.  This certainly allows you to fish the flies static but you miss them tightening of the line in your finger tips which gives me the buzz!

Intermediates and lures certainly play their part! Small waters are often stocked frequently to keep active sport so a lure is always worth a try. White and Black and green lures are a must as are snake lures. What’s key is not to be too repetitive with your retrieve and to keep changing your flies and keep on the move. Don’t be tempted to fish two lures together as this could be too much for clear waters and pressured fish. I tend to find slowly moved lures will work better than those robotically thrown out and pulled back. Snakes have been a revolution in recent years and without doubt a medium figure of 8 is the best retrieve for hooking up.

A winter fishery trout

A winter fishery trout taken on a lure

Fish can be found in shallower water looking for any insect life hatching in this marginally warmer water, look for this preferably sloping off over a ledge. Many small waters have reeds along the edges, fish along these keeping a low profile. If the wind is not too strong it will pay dividends to fish straight into it. Don’t be put off by a head wind as the fish will be ‘up the banks’ so a far cast isn’t required. It’s more important to ensure the flies turnover and land straight than it is to get distance.  Keep low and bring your flies as close to the side as you can

Don’t be disappointed if the fish are not playing all day as you will find they feed in short periods and despite dipping temperatures , the last half an hour can be as busy as any part of the day!

Try my new Micro Buzzer packs along with my new Jelly Blob and Fab packs and fish them together static. Keep changing the colour of fab or blob. The Dancer pack is worth a go giving a variety of colours of gold headed lures. Fishtec are soon to be selling my single flies so look out for my new snakes for 2019, coming soon!!

Next blog will prepare you for when the Reservoirs open!

The Shortest Month – Rene’ Harrop

Noted mainly as being the shortest month of our longest season, February is a continuation of deep winter on the Henry’s Fork. Precipitation mostly in the form of snow averages more than in January while temperatures in the early part of the month can be among the coldest of the year. Still, there is benefit to a fly fisherman when daylight stretches toward 6:00 P.m., an addition of 1 ¼ hours from the lowest point in mid-December to February first.

A Hope For Spring

A Hope For Spring

For much of the month ice will continue to chill the river and fishing is mainly limited to deep nymphing for bottom hugging trout still locked in winter’s lethargy. Eventually, however, the occurrence of severely frigid days begins to thin and the river enters a period of reawakening.

While midges exist almost exclusively as the basis for February dry fly opportunity, the days of rising fish increase proportionately to increasing air temperatures as the month progresses.  Though spring Baetis are a rare feature prior to early March, there are occasional years when the first mayflies can make a token appearance in late February. Usually, this uncommon event portends an early spring which in the high country can mean returning to our mountain cabin in April rather than May. However, in a place where general prosperity is measured by the abundance of snow, only a foolish person would welcome the temporary comfort of a short, dry winter.

February Brown

February Brown

Fortunately, we now approach February with snow continuing to accumulate and the expectation of that trend extending into the foreseeable future. Accessing the river will be come more not less difficult until average daytime highs rise well above the freezing mark and rain becomes the common form of precipitation.

In the interim, I will savor the incremental process of achieving spring while enjoying even small advancements in outdoor comfort.

Back on the water

Back on the water

As the water warms and winter releases its icy grip, the activity level of trout responds proportionately to the change. Hungry from winter’s dormancy, the big guys will go on the prowl and the methods of capitalizing of this new-found energy begin to expand.

By February’s end, I will be pulling a streamer at least as often as fishing a nymph and the dry fly rod will seldom be left at home.

While warm days and green grass lie well into the future, the shortest month will not be time wished away nor will it include long strings of days spent indoors away from the water. And at this point in winter, that is good enough.

February Distraction

February Distraction

5 Top Tips For Keeping Your Bivvy Warm In Winter

With winter at it’s worst keeping warm in your bivvy whilst waiting for that illusive run is key. Our tips explain how you can keep yourself comfortable in even the harshest conditions!

Tip 1. Insulate your floor – the ground is your worst enemy in winter. Moisture, cold and damp rises from the floor up. Always use a groundsheet, and if you can layer the floor of your bivvy with an insulator such as an old piece of carpet or a thermal blanket. You can also strategically place items of luggage around key areas of your bivvy to keep drafts down.

All set up for winter angling!

All set up for winter angling!

Tip 2. Keep dirt and moisture out – Ensure you keep your muddy and wet boots outside your bivvy. A bivvy mat really comes in handy for footwear storage and to help rid any excess dirt or mud.

Bivvy mat

Bivvy mat – a winter carpers best friend

Tip 3. Heating – Many anglers are using bivvy heaters in order to stay warm in winter. When using heaters, safety is a major concern as carbon monoxide poisoning is a real threat. Some of these, like the candle powered Nash bank Life heater are perfectly safe and easy to use. A hot water bottle is another essential, again with no safety risk.

Nash bank life bivvy heater

Nash bank life bivvy heater

Tip 4.  Select your swim with care – Swim choice and the positioning of your bivvy within it are a major consideration. Unless it is the lake ‘hot spot’ a very exposed swim with the wind howling onto it may not be the best choice. A sheltered swim may also be a good spot to find carp holding in a thermal refuge. Make note of where the wind is blowing and angle the front of your bivvy away from any prevailing cold winds. Also make use of any trees and vegetation in your swim that could give you a wind break or potential shelter from rain.

Tip 5. Clothing and sleeping bags – Your own body heat goes a long way so ensure you have the correct thermal gear for the job. 4 and 5 season rated sleeping bags are a must. A good bedchair cover is another addition that you should not be without. Thermal underwear, hoodies and a waterproof jacket are also ‘must haves’. A great bit of winter kit for sleeping in is the extremely warm TF Gear onesie.

tfg-chillout-onesie

The TF Gear Chillout hoody – perfect for cold weather carping!

For more warm clothing tips, including layering, check out our blog post here.

New Gear – Airflo Thermotex Pro Puffa jacket

Fishing clothing review: Robbie Winram of Trout Fisherman magazine takes a closer look at the new thermal garment from Airflo – the Thermotex Pro Puffa jacket.

This jacket is one of the ‘insulated’ designs that is becoming so popular, not just for fishing, but a whole range of outdoor pursuits.

It comes in a stylish steel-grey with highlights of bright yellow and wouldn’t look out of place on the high street or in the pub. It is made of polyester with horizontal baffles throughout the body and sleeves, and although the face fabric does not have a DWR finish it did fend off a light shower. But this jacket is all about providing warmth and even if its synthetic insulation does get soaked, it will still keep you warm, unlike natural down or feather which don’t retain heat when wet.

Thermotex Pro Puffa

Thermotex Pro Puffa

A full-length single zip has a good size storm baffle behind it, and it tucks away into a neat fabric chin guard to prevent chafing. The fixed hood has a bright yellow lining and has an elasticated cord and toggle lock adjusters to fine-tune the fit around the face.

The tail ends of the cords are concealed inside the jacket so they don’t hang loose. There is also a cord/toggle system on the back of the hood although this gives minimal adjustment and in fact the hood works better over the top of a peaked cap or hat.

There is one chest pocket and two waist pockets, all with zips and decent size, bright yellow pull tabs and cords. The sleeves finish in simple elasticated cuffs and at the bottom of the jacket is an elasticated cord with double toggle lock adjusters. Again the cords are retained inside the jacket and don’t hang loose. On the inside there are two very deep open-top pouch pockets for light accessories.

Available in sizes M to XXXL.

Verdict: The jacket is windproof and very warm but also breathable so will vent off any heat before it builds up. It glides over base layers so doesn’t restrict your casting action.The perfect garment on those crisp cold winter days or can be used as a mid-layer underneath a light waterproof shell.

Thermotex Pro Puffa jackets from Airflo are available here.

The new Airflo puffa jacket

The new Airflo puffa jacket

5 New Years Fishing Resolution’s For 2019

2019 is going to be a great year for fishing!! We all have New Years resolution’s, but how about some fishing ones? As an angler, these suggestions should hopefully improve your fishing year to come.

1. Fish more often

Did you fish as much as you had hoped for last year? Probably not. So set aside a target number of days to spend on the bank this year. For example, a minimum of 5, 10 or 20. Tick them off as you go so you know how many you have done. Tip: Why not tell the other half about your target, whilst she’s still in a festive mood?

2. Visit a new venue

Visiting a new water can change your mindset and get you thinking outside of the box. It’s always worth making that long drive to a place you’ve always wanted to fish, but have never visited. Instead of ‘maybe next year.’ plan a day and get in the car and do it when the time comes.

Dedicate a day to visiting a new venue

Dedicate a day to visiting a new venue

3. Get somebody into fishing

Our sport needs new members, so why not take somebody with you? A friend, child or relative might appreciate fishing and it could lead to a life long passion. So why not dedicate a day or two for sharing and instruction this year rather than for yourself.

family fishing

Image source: Tide Lines
Letting the kids come with you is a great way to catch their interest.

4. Get involved with a clean up

Whether you area member of a carp syndicate, an angling club or simply on a day ticket our rivers and lakes need a bit of TLC. Even if its a few hours of your time sweeping the bank with a bin bag, a clean up makes your venue a much better place to fish and inspires respect from others.

A river clean up. Image: Wandle trust

5. Take stock of your fishing tackle

The New Year is the perfect time to check through your fishing gear. Make a resolution to give it a good sort out – be ruthless and sell or giveaway the stuff you never use, or if it is past it’s sell by date chuck it out. If find you need near fishing gear, then indulge yourself – it’s better to have everything ready for 2019 than not.

It’s 2019 – time to sort out this mess and treat yourself to some new gear! Image: Ifish.net

Angling Trust And Fish Legal Fundraising Dinner

Worried about the state of our freshwater environment? We are and so are The Angling Trust.

Did you know that half of all aquatic species including many fish are in decline and 13% are threatened with extinction?

To help turn this around, Angling Trust have launched a new joint initiative with The Rivers Trust and WWF. YOU can help them raise vital funds to protect our freshwater environment and fish.

There are lots of ways to get involved with this joint initiative  – join them at their fundraising dinner, donate an auction lot or take part in the auction itself which has a fantastic range of lots to suit all budgets and tastes.

The Angling Trust 2019 Dinner Fundraiser

The Angling Trust 2019 Dinner Fundraiser

More information on the Angling Trust dinner event can be found here.