How to Dress for Winter Sea Fishing

The coldest months are the best time to target species such as cod, but dress carefully to stay safe and warm. Image source: Alan Yates

The coldest months are the best time to target species such as cod, but dress carefully to stay safe and warm.
Image source: Alan Yates

Winter can be one of the most productive times for shore fishing. The largest cod – those well into double figures – are caught during the winter months, while species such as whiting, flounder, dab and coalfish can all provide action for anglers who are waiting for big cod to bite.

The best winter fishing usually coincides with strong winds and rough seas. While these may be the best conditions for catching large fish, they’re some of the most challenging for anglers. Chris Middleton tells us how to stay safe and keep warm when the cold bites.

Why it’s important to keep warm

ice-fishing

Anglers fishing in the coldest conditions – such as Iceland – rely on thermal suits.
Image source: Shutterstock

In winter the temperature can drop well below zero, with cold winds, rain or sea spray making conditions even worse for anglers. Failing to wear suitable clothing makes for uncomfortable fishing, and in extreme cases can put an angler’s health, and even life, at risk. A two degree drop in body temperature is all it takes for you to suffer hypothermia. A mild case will result in irritability, confusion and unconsciousness. Ultimately it can end in death.

The good news is that the right clothing can make winter sea fishing one of the most exciting sports you can imagine. Advances in materials and fabrics mean that modern thermal suits, flotation suits, jackets, hats and gloves will keep you safe, dry and toasty warm while fishing in any type of weather.

Thermal suits

Fishtec-thermal-suit

Some anglers find one piece suits warmer, but two-piece are more versatile.
Featured product: Imax 2-piece Thermo suit from Fishtec

If you’re serious about fishing in winter, a thermal suit is an essential investment. Today, two piece suits which offer a separate jacket and trousers/braces bottom are the most popular option, although one piece suits are also available.

As thermal suits are very effective, anglers don’t have to wear too many layers underneath them. Many find that a T-shirt and sweater along with jogging bottoms is sufficient, but those looking for extra warmth could always add additional layers.

All good thermal suits feature a heavy-duty outer shell and a warm thermal lining – a combination with keeps the wind and rain out and allows anglers to remain warm. Other features include a detachable hood, thermal-lined exterior pockets, Velcro adjustable cuffs and an interior pocket with a zip (ideal for keeping a mobile phone, car keys or other valuables.) The Imax Thermo Suit from Fishtec provides all of this for just £89.99. Alternatively, the Imax ARX-20 Ice Thermo Suit allows anglers to fish comfortably at temperatures as low as -20 degrees.

Flotation suits

Fishtec-flotation-suit

Not a replacement for a life jacket – but it could help save your life.
Featured product: Daiwa Sas MK7 2 Piece Flotation Suit from Fishtec

Flotation suits offer the same warmth and protection from wind and rain as thermal suits, but with the added advantage of buoyancy for anyone unlucky enough to fall into the sea while fishing. These suits offer a higher level of security for anglers who fish from rock marks or other exposed fishing marks.

These suits typically offer 50 Newtons of lift (less than a life jacket which is designed to be used in tidal waters) so they’re not designed to be used in place of a regular life jacket. But they will help keep you afloat if you fall in – potentially saving your life. There are two choices of flotation suit – a one piece style, or a two piece that consists of a jacket and separate trousers with shoulder straps. Most people find the two-piece version more versatile as you can wear the jacket alone when it’s not cold enough to warrant the whole thing. The Daiwa Sas MK7 2 Piece Flotation Suit from Fishtec is a high quality option from a well-known manufacturer – a good investment at £114.99.

Jackets

Fishtec-sea-fishing-jacket

Fishing jackets have corrosion-resistant zips, ideal in wet, salty conditions.
Featured product: TF Gear Force 8 Waterproof Jacket from Fishtec

Of course not all fishing takes place in the coldest or most extreme weather! Mild winter night fishing for cod, or an autumn evening lure fishing for bass will require a warm jacket rather than a full flotation suit.

Modern jackets constructed from breathable materials don’t restrict movement and allow you to cast to your heart’s content. However, they are very warm and waterproof, meaning that you’ll be protected if the temperature suddenly plummets or there’s a flash downpour. The TF Gear Force 8 Waterproof Jacket is an ideal example – totally wind and waterproof with polar fleece lining, comfortable elasticated cuffs and a lined hood with draw cord.

Hats and gloves

Fishtec-gloves

A quality pair of fishing gloves make long winter sessions much more comfortable.
Featured product: Imax Oceanic Gloves from Fishtec

It’s important to invest in high-quality, effective hats and gloves. Indeed, insufficiently warm gloves could allow your hands to get so cold you’ll be unable to carry out basic sea fishing actions such as tying knots, reeling in or unclipping terminal tackle. In serious cases gloves that don’t protect the hands properly have led to anglers getting frostbite. A pair of high quality thermal gloves – such as the Imax Oceanic Glove – are an essential item of clothing for winter anglers.

And don’t forget your head. While most thermal and flotation suits come with a thermal lined hood, many people also wear an additional woolly hat as extra protection from cold winds. Peaked, fleece lined hats which cover the ears are popular with some anglers when the sun is setting. Polarised sunglasses are also useful. The anti-glare properties help anglers spot fish such as mullet feeding just below the surface of the water. These Bolle polarised fishing sunglasses are a popular choice and a lanyard is probably a good idea!

Footwear

Fishtec-thermal-boot

Standard wellington boots may keep feet dry, but they won’t keep feet warm enough during winter fishing trips.
Featured product: TF Gear Thermo Boots from Fishtec

During a winter fishing session your feet can become very cold, especially if there’s snow on the ground or in frosty conditions. Invest in boots with a heat-retaining thermal lining that are specifically designed for harsh winter weather.

Indeed, many anglers have learned the hard way that normal walking boots or wellingtons are simply not warm enough on cold winter nights, even when worn with thermal socks. The TF Gear Thermo boots are an ideal example of this type of footwear and will keep feet warm down to temperatures of -10 degrees.

What should I wear for winter sea fishing?

Don’t get so caught up in decisions about rigs, venue and bait when planning a sea fishing trip that the correct clothing becomes an afterthought. Inadequate clothing will not only spoil your enjoyment, but could even threaten your health. Here’s a quick summary of the essential clothes you’ll need for winter sea fishing:

  • A good quality thermal or flotation suit
  • A wind and waterproof, thermal lined fishing jacket
  • High quality, thermal gloves, purpose designed
  • A warm, woolly hat, with peak if sunny
  • Thermal boots
  • Polarised sunglasses
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Fly Fishing Stocking Fillers – Gift Ideas For Christmas

For the fly angler who has it all there is always room for just one more item of tackle….. right?

In this blog post we take a look at ten popular fly fishing tackle stocking fillers – perfect gifts for Christmas!

1) Airflo EVA fly box – £12.99

A nifty little pocket box that can accommodate 264 flies in both slotted and slitted foam inserts. The box uses secure magnetic corners to keep it closed; it also floats and is crush proof – what more do you need in a fly box?

A fly fishing box for all occasions

2) Dr Slick XBC Series forceps – £15.99

Good quality forceps from Doctor Slick – robust, useful and made of the best surgical alloy, coated in an attractive coloured gloss finish in your choice of blue or red. Dr Slick are our preferred fly fishing unhooking tools by a long margin!

Dr Slick accessories

Dr Slick XBC Accessories

3) Streamtec Wading staff – £44.99

Whether you fish a river or a reservoir, a wading staff is an extremely handy bit of gear. For crossing raging rivers to testing for soft spots in the lake-bed, a staff ensures you can fish in safety. Collapsible and supplied in its own sheath, this staff is a great gift for any fly angler who does a lot of wade fishing.

The Airflo Streamtec Staff

The Airflo Streamtec Staff

4) Mustad Filleting Knife – £6.99

A knife is a handy bit of kit for any angler – for cleaning fish or just general usefulness whilst out and about on the bank. This offering from Mustad also includes a sharpening block, representing superb value.

A knife is a handy thing!

A knife is a handy thing!

5) C & F Design 3 in 1 Clippers – £14.00

Not all nippers are created equal – these C & F design clippers are the Rolls Royce of the tippet severing world! Razor sharp, they feature a fly eye cleaner for stubborn varnish and also two sizes of fly threader, making attaching even tiny flies to your leader a complete doddle.

The best fly fishing nipper on the market?

The best fly fishing nipper on the market?

6) Tools and Vice Set – £29.99

A great little portable tyers kit including a vice and all the tools you will ever need, encapsulated within a solid wooden storage box. A perfect gift for a budding fly tyer or for somebody needing a travel fly tying kit.

Vice and tools set

Vice and tools set – a perfect gift for a fledgling fly tyer

7) Overboard Phone case – £18.99

The ever present danger of slipping into the water whilst fishing is a genuine peril that happens to even the best of us. This quality waterproof phone case will ensure your communication device remains in full working order – even if you are forced to retreat home from a dunking. An essential that no fly fisherman should be without!

Overboard phone cases

Overboard phone cases – protection guaranteed

8) 1080P HD Action Camera – £34.99

For capturing your fishing moments for eternity this superb value action camera is hard to beat. Fully waterproof and submersible, it has options for still images, as well as 720p and 1080p wide angle video capture. In addition, this camera also has WiFi connectivity, allowing you to stream recordings to your phone or activate it remotely.

Action Camera - now with WiFi!

HD Action Camera – now with WiFi!

9) Airflo Pro Priest – £13.99

Dispatching the catch is a necessary thing, should you wish to retain a fish for the table. As well as being weighted for efficient stockie slaying, these aluminum priests are ergonomically designed for easy gripping. Three colours to choose from – silver, blue and red.

The Airflo Pro Priest -red

The Airflo Pro Priest -red

10) Fishtec Gift Vouchers

If in doubt, a gift voucher is a sure-fire festive gift. Available in online or physical formats, Fishtec gift vouchers are sold in £10 blocks and can be ordered right up to (and through!) the Christmas period for delivery to the recipients inbox.

Fishtec Gift vouchers

Fishtec Gift vouchers

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Airflo Spring Invitational Fly Fishing Competition

A brand new event for 2018, this 6 man team fly fishing competition will be held at Rutland Water over the 19th & 20th of May.

HOW TO ENTER/QUALIFICATION METHODS

Entry forms will be sent to the following teams, with at least a further 6 team places available.

  • Top 10 teams at AWAI final 2017
  • Top 5 teams at SPORTFISH team final 2017
  • At least a further 6 entries will be made available on a first come first served basis

ENTRY FEES

The entry fee will be £200 per team; all team members will receive a goody bag including an Airflo fly line and Airflo Baseball cap with a RRP of £57.98

PRIZE FUND

  • 1st Team – £1500 Cash, Trophy, Medals, plus tackle prizes
  • 2nd Team – £750 Cash, Medals, plus tackle prizes
  • 3rd Team – £500 Cash, Medals plus tackle prizes
  • Top Rod overall – Trophy, plus Airflo fly rod
  • Top Rod Day One – Airflo reel
  • Top Rod Day Two – Airflo reel
  • Biggest Fish Day One
  • Biggest Fish Day two

FISHING TIMES

Saturday will be fished 10am-6pm and Sunday will be 10am -5pm, after which we will be holding the presentation at the Fishing lodge, complete with a Hog roast.

FISHING RULES

The event will follow Airflo Anglian Water rules and a copy of these is available HERE.

APPLY HERE

Applications are to be made in writing. To download an application form, click HERE

Rutland Water - A special venue

Rutland Water – A truly special venue

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5 Grayling Fishing Tips

Crisp, cold winter air with frost on the ground can mean only one thing – grayling time! Fishtec’s Ceri Thomas shares 5 top grayling fishing tips for success on the river this winter.

The grayling

The grayling – a winter loving fish.

1. Find the shoal for action. Grayling are a naturally gregarious fish – find one, you will find more. Grayling shoals often live and grow to maturity their whole life in the same pool or run in a river – so if you want a quick start to the action, head to where you found them last winter, they could now be even bigger.

2. Want a specimen? Cover ground and explore. BIG grayling are much more solitary than standard size schoolies and are found in smaller pods of 2 or 3. You won’t often find them mixing with their smaller brethren, so if you are catching lots of hand sized ‘shots’ then don’t linger.

A decent grayling, part of a small pod of big fish.

A decent grayling, part of a small pod of big fish.

3. Be strike happy – Whether you are drifting a strike indicator, watching a french leader, or a dry fly with a nymph suspended under it, if you see ANY stop, twitch or subtle movement then strike! Yes, this could be the bottom or a leaf, but often it is a fish and striking finds out for sure.

If you see the leader stop then STRIKE

If you see the leader stop then STRIKE

4. Keep things sharp – Hook points suffer when grayling nymphing, which usually requires fishing your flies hard on the deck. Checking and then maintaining a sharp hook point can be the difference between success and failure – so invest in a hook sharpener and use it, regularly!

5. Red, purple or pink – catch like stink. Use of flies with bright colours as trigger points can often result in a red letter day, IF the fish are keyed on them, they will often actively and aggressively seek them out. It pays to always have a ‘trigger’ nymph as part of your team of flies, alongside some more naturalistic patterns.

Grayling flies with trigger points can work wonders

Grayling flies with trigger points can work wonders!

For more grayling fishing tips, be sure to check out our comprehensive Grayling fishing guide here.

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A Beginner’s Guide to Fish Care

Releasing your quarry unharmed is one of the most important things any angler can learn. Dominic Garnett shares essential tips to help you safely catch and release your fish so that they’re ready to do battle another day!

Fish_Care_ - 2

If a fish has fought hard, you may need to support it in the water until it gets its breath back
Image source: Dom Garnett

While it’s great to learn all about rigs, methods and tactics for big fish, one of the most important aspects of modern angling is one of the least written about. Handling and releasing your catch safely should be one of the first things an angler learns; sadly it’s not always the case.

Why do we release fish in the first place? It’s simple. To preserve our sport. If we took our catch home every time we went fishing, we would soon run out. That’s the reality of living on a small island country with lots of anglers and only so many fish to catch! A fish that is dead cannot give another angler pleasure. It cannot grow bigger or, crucially, breed and produce more fish. Furthermore, there is a deep satisfaction in returning a fish safely, knowing it will live to fight not just another day, but possibly many years.

Preparation and essential equipment

FC-ROGUE-CRAD

Featured product: the new Leeda Rogue Carp Unhooking Cradle from Fishtec is just £39.99

Besides the right gear, good fish care is all about anticipation and being prepared. Do you know where your forceps or scales are at a moment’s notice? Is your tackle strong enough, and have you earmarked a safe place to land a fish in advance?

Having the right gear is another must. Two of the most commonly neglected pieces of equipment are the correct unhooking tools (a pair of pliers is no good) and the right landing net (a generous sized net of soft mesh). A large, quality landing net also doubles as a good investment for retaining fish in the water for short periods. Last but not least, nobody fishing for carp, pike or other larger species should be without an unhooking mat or cradle – and many clubs and fisheries won’t let you fish without one.

Many anglers also debarb hooks or use barbless patterns these days too. In 90% of situations, barbless is best. The possible exception is with large fish, the argument being that a barbless can move around and cut more during a long fight. In this situation, I believe a “bumped” hook is best (i.e. one where the profile of the barb has been reduced by pliers, but there is still a slight “bump”). This stops the hook moving around during the fight, but can still be removed without any tearing.

12 golden rules of fish care

Fish_Care_ - 3

The right way to pose for a quick picture; low to the ground and with a mat underneath
Image source: Dom Garnett

When it comes to safely handling and releasing fish, there are a few golden rules. Advance knowledge and preparation are key here; the time to wonder about best practice is not when a fish is kicking on the bank! Here are some of the universal rules of responsible catch and release angling:

Always handle fish with wet hands: This avoids removing their protective slime. NEVER use a towel. You will notice fish behave much better if you have wet hands (think about it – they have come from somewhere cold and wet, while your paws are dry and warm!)

Always have the right tools: You should never fish without the means to extract a hook. For small fish, a disgorger is the answer and for larger species, forceps are better. If you fish for pike, these should be a minimum of 12” long. Buy quality and always pack a spare set (they are easy to lose on the bank and lots of companies make the damned things green or dull coloured!)

Use sensible tackle: A totally knackered fish is a fish in danger. Try not to play your quarry to exhaustion, but be as quick as reasonably possible. Large fish like carp, pike and barbel need strong gear. If the fish has fought like fury, you could give it a few seconds to rest in the water before you handle it.

Handle fish carefully and as little as possible: The less faff the better here. The more handling, the more slime you remove and the more risk.

Be prepared: Have your unhooking equipment, camera and other essentials ready and close to hand at all times.

Keep time out of water to a minimum: If you want to weigh a fish or take a picture, you can always keep it immersed using your landing net (or perhaps in a carp sack briefly) while you set up the shot and zero your scales. Avoid keeping your catch out of water for more than is absolutely necessary.

Use the right net: Landing nets are often essential for all but the smallest fish. Avoid small nets and harsh mesh materials (modern rubberized mesh is excellent). A large net can also be used to briefly retain your catch in the water to let it recover or give it a breather if you want to take a picture.

Never stand up or walk around while holding a big fish: A fish dropped from standing height is often a dead one; it may swim off, but you will have damaged its internal organs. Instead, kneel with it over the mat or the water for safety. And use your net to carry fish back to the water, lowering gently back.

Handle with care (cradle, don’t clench): A fish is a living thing, not a bragging item. Hold it as you would a little baby, not some macho trophy. If it’s really heavy, supporting closer to your body is safer than thrusting out to the camera. Try to “cradle” a large fish, and avoid clenching or squeezing around the throat area because this is where many of the vital organs are.

Weigh safely and keep your catch wet: The easiest way to weigh a fish is in the net, and then deduct the weight of your net later. Make sure the fish is lying “flush” (i.e. evenly in the bottom of the net with no fins trapped) before lifting the scales. Specimen hunters often prefer a sling. If you use one of these, make sure it’s well doused with water.

Lower, don’t drop: Although non-anglers will ask if you’re going to “throw” it back, this is not something a caring angler would ever do. Every fish should be lowered back into the water if humanly possible. If the spot is awkward and this is impossible, use your net to lower the fish back safely.

Support if necessary: Sometimes fish will swim off strongly right away. Other times they may be tired and need some help. If a fish has battled hard, never just let go of it right away. Hold it upright in the water for a few seconds to let it recover (this could be a few minutes for some fish).

First aid for fish

Last but not least, some anglers go even further with fish care, especially for carp, by applying a little first aid. Products such as Klinik can disinfect any nicks from hooks or scale damage, assisting recovery. Gel-based products are the most effective, as they stick to the target.

Another tip for those who need to retain a net of small to medium fish for photography is to use a little clove oil mixed with water and douse the fish; it is a natural anesthetic and calms them down. In fact, Environment Agency staff have been known to use it in fish surveys to de-stress fish.

Pike and other special cases…

Fish_Care_ -08

The right way to do it: cradle and support your catch , avoid dry hands or clenching at the throat.
Image source: Dom Garnett

Another important point to make in our guide is that not all fish are created as tough as each other. Carp, the most cared for of the lot, are tough as old boots (obviously this is still no reason not to treat them with total respect!)

Grayling, trout and others can be very brittle though, and need extra care. Pike are perhaps the most misunderstood and fragile fish of all, in spite of their fierce appearances. For a thorough guide to pike unhooking and handling, it’s well worth checking out the Pike Angler’s Club’s code of safe practice.

What about sea fish and stocked trout?

While coarse anglers are very much at the forefront of catch and release, a lot of sea and game anglers are now just as passionate about fish welfare. Indeed, if you’re not going to eat it, why on earth wouldn’t you want it to go back unharmed?

Most coarse fish, and indeed many wild game fish, are protected by law these days and removing them is a criminal offence. However, with some stocked trout, as well as sea fish above a set of minimum size limits, you may choose (or be obliged) to take the fish.

We would strongly advise returning slow-growing and precious fish such as salmon and bass, even if you may legally take them. But if you must kill, do it quickly and humanely – a “priest” is the tool to do it, with a short sharp blow to the skull on the top of the head.

How else can we make sure fish go back safely?

Fish_Care_ - 1

We all have a responsibility to protect our fish stock
Image source: Dom Garnett

Feelings can run quite high when it comes to catch and release practice these days. Facebook pictures of fish handled with towels or without an unhooking mat in sight quickly attract a barrage of critical and angry comments.

While we all want to see responsible fishing, there should be no place for abuse. We can learn from each other and often those targeted by angry comments on social media are just inexperienced, rather than deliberately cruel. Don’t immediately castigate those who show poor practice – the last way to make anyone listen and learn is to start a fight with them. Be helpful and friendly, and remember you were once inexperienced too.

There are of course other cases where anglers know the rules but are still negligent or even criminal – and we can and should help to protect our waters. On the vast majority of coarse fisheries, taking fish is illegal and you should report any poachers or law-breakers to the Environment Agency hotline. The number is 0800 80 70 60 – have it stored on your phone!

We all have a part to play in protecting the sport. It might seem ironic, but the folks who want to stick a hook in fish are usually also their greatest protectors. We will inevitably cause fish some brief stress, but with modern barbless hooks and careful handling, virtually every fish we catch will swim off happily and continue to thrive. I should know. There are several times when I’ve re-captured the same fish years later, bigger and in rude health. What a great feeling!

Read more from our blogger…
A weekly Angling Times columnist, Dom Garnett is also a South West fishing guide and author of several books, including the Amazon Bestseller Flyfishing for Coarse Fish, Canal Fishing and his recent book of angling tales Crooked Lines. Read more at www.dgfishing.co.uk

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Thoughts on the Airflo Super Stik Fly Rod: Review by Gareth Wilson

In this long term tackle review Fishtec’s Gareth Wilson shares his thoughts on the Airflo Super Stik fly rod – after spending a full season in action with it on the bank!

As both a stillwater and migratory species river fly fisher having one rod to cover both aspects of my fishing allows me to cut down on gear and travel light. However, finding a rod that can deal with the challenge of wrestling with big salmon and hard fighting sea trout while not being overkill on stocked fish is quite challenging.

One on the Super Stik from Ellerdine lakes

One on the Super Stik from Ellerdine lakes

Early this season I purchased a 10′ #7/8 Airflo Super Stik, for primarily for sea trout fishing with large stillwaters and boat angling being an added bonus if the rod was up to the task. The early season saw us visiting Garnffrwd, The Usk Reservoir, Ellerdine and Llyn Cllywedog with the average fish being 2 and a half pound but some special fish amongst them including a 12.8lb tiger trout and a few double figure rainbows.

The rod handled perfectly. It could turn over a team of flies with great presentation and also pump bigger lures into the wind with no problem. The middle to tip action on the rod is great for achieving big distances with ease, especially when used with Airflo’s Forty Plus intermediates and Super Dri sink tip lines.

Between May and October the focus switched to the river fishing with sea trout being my true passion. Sewin (Welsh for Sea trout) are In my opinion the hardest fighting fresh water fish we have in the UK.

It wasn’t long before a real bend was put in the rod with my farther in law landing this double figure sewin on the Super Stik. The rod played the fish perfectly absorbing every leap and run the sea trout had to offer and it wasn’t long before she was netted and released safely.

On our next trip it was my turn with three sewin caught. The night started with a 4lb hen fish who wanted to stay deep and kept trying to get under the bank. The next fish almost in the same location was a 6.7lbs male. He was all fight exploding out of the water around 3 ft in the air before boring deep running down the pool and taking me almost to the backing – before changing direction and swimming straight back towards me. I kept in contact and again he came leaping out and crashing back down. After landing this fish I knew this rod was a winner!

A Sewin on the Super Stik

A Sewin on the Super Stik

The winter period sees me returning to stillwater fly fishing. Here being able to cast a great distance can be a massive advantage. You can cover fish that have been pushed out by other anglers and for the bigger fish holding deep. The Airflo Super Stick is perfect for casting extreme distances. It loads extremely efficiently and easily with modern day fly lines and you’ll find you can get incredible distances with ease. The cost of this rod is incredible  value and it handles better than other rods I have tried at more than triple its cost.

This is a perfect bit of kit for the all-rounder and will handle small dries, teams of 3 or 4 flies and big sea trout and salmon flies alike. A real bargain and a rod you won’t regret purchasing.

Stop Press: For a limited time period Airflo Super Stik Rods are now just £99.99!! Check out the Super Stik rod range here.

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Most wanted fishing gifts this Christmas

Fishing Christmas Gifts

Fishing gifts for Christmas
Image source: Dasytnik

For anglers who want an instant Christmas wish list or for non-anglers looking to buy a gift for a fishing enthusiast – we have the answer.

We asked our fishing community what gifts they most wanted this Christmas and we had over 1,000 responses. The results are below and there’s a gift for a variety of budgets and fishing styles. Here is the definitive Christmas gift list for people who love fishing:

Carp and coarse fishing Christmas gifts

There’s an abundance of carp and coarse fishing gear to choose from but here’s the most wanted this Christmas:

 

Fly fishing Christmas gifts

Here’s a selection of gadgets, garments and gear our fly fishing fraternity want the most:

 

Sea fishing Christmas gifts

The most wanted sea fishing gifts are perhaps predictably very practical:

Shopping for something specific? Browse our full range of fishing tackle online or give us a call on 0871 911 7001.

Want 15% off your order from 17th to Midnight 19th November??? Then shop through this LINK!

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Most wanted fly fishing Xmas gift survey – WIN £100

Fishtec Xmas gift survey vouchers

WIN a £100 Fishtec voucher – complete our simple survey to enter

Choose the fly fishing gifts you most want this Christmas and win a £100 Fishtec voucher.

We’ve shortlisted some of the most popular products for you to choose from in our simple survey below.

To Enter
• Go to the short survey below.
• Add your email address – we need this to notify the winner.
• Scroll and click on the gift you most want in each price range.
• Click submit.

Once submitted you’ll be automatically entered into our free prize draw to win a £100 Fishtec voucher.

So what are you waiting for? It only takes 2 minutes…

Closing date: 5pm Thursday 16th November 2017

Terms and conditions

By entering into this free prize draw, all entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.

In the event that any entrant does not, or is unable to, comply with and meet these Terms and Conditions and the prize draw information, Fishtec shall be entitled at its sole discretion to disqualify such entrant, without any further liability to such entrant.

The closing date for this prize draw is 5pm Thursday 16th November 2017.

The winner will be notified by email, within 30 days of the closing date.

The entrant must provide a valid email address to enter the prize draw.

Email addresses will be used to notify the winner, and may occasionally be used for notifying the entrant of future promotions by BVG Group Limited.

Your details will not be shared with or sold to any third party companies.

To enter this prize draw you must be: (a) a UK resident; and (b) 18 years old or over at the time of entry.

This prize draw is free to enter and no purchase is necessary.

Fishtec may exercise its sole discretion to use the winner’s name for future promotional, marketing and publicity purposes in any media worldwide without notice or without any fee being paid.

This prize draw is not open to employees (or members of their immediate families) of BVG Group Limited.

The prize for our Most Wanted Xmas Gift survey is £100 worth of Fishtec vouchers. No cash alternative for the prize stated is offered.

Only one entry per person is permitted.

The winner will be chosen at random by Fishtec.

The judges’ decision will be final, and no correspondence will be entered into.

Winners will be notified by email. If winners fail to reply within 48 hours, Fishtec reserves the right to pick another winner.

If you have any queries relating to our terms and conditions please contact: c.thomas@bvg-airflo.co.uk

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Most wanted coarse fishing Xmas gift survey – WIN £100

Fishtec Xmas gift survey vouchers

WIN a £100 Fishtec voucher – complete our simple survey to enter


Choose the coarse and carp fishing gifts you want this Christmas and win a £100 Fishtec voucher.

We’ve shortlisted some of the most popular products for you to choose from in our simple survey below.

To Enter
• Go to the short survey below.
• Add your email address – we need this to notify the winner.
• Scroll and click on the gift you most want in each price range.
• Click submit.

Once submitted you’ll be automatically entered into our free prize draw to win a £100 Fishtec voucher.

So what are you waiting for? It only takes 2 minutes…

Closing date: 5pm Thursday 16th November 2017

Terms and conditions

By entering into this free prize draw, all entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.

In the event that any entrant does not, or is unable to, comply with and meet these Terms and Conditions and the prize draw information, Fishtec shall be entitled at its sole discretion to disqualify such entrant, without any further liability to such entrant.

The closing date for this prize draw is 5pm Thursday 16th November 2017.

The winner will be notified by email, within 30 days of the closing date.

The entrant must provide a valid email address to enter the prize draw.

Email addresses will be used to notify the winner, and may occasionally be used for notifying the entrant of future promotions by BVG Group Limited.

Your details will not be shared with or sold to any third party companies.

To enter this prize draw you must be: (a) a UK resident; and (b) 18 years old or over at the time of entry.

This prize draw is free to enter and no purchase is necessary.

Fishtec may exercise its sole discretion to use the winner’s name for future promotional, marketing and publicity purposes in any media worldwide without notice or without any fee being paid.

This prize draw is not open to employees (or members of their immediate families) of BVG Group Limited.

The prize for our Most Wanted Xmas Gift survey is £100 worth of Fishtec vouchers. No cash alternative for the prize stated is offered.

Only one entry per person is permitted.

The winner will be chosen at random by Fishtec.

The judges’ decision will be final, and no correspondence will be entered into.

Winners will be notified by email. If winners fail to reply within 48 hours, Fishtec reserves the right to pick another winner.

If you have any queries relating to our terms and conditions please contact: c.thomas@bvg-airflo.co.uk

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Most wanted sea fishing Xmas gift survey – WIN £100

Fishtec Xmas gift survey vouchers

WIN a £100 Fishtec voucher – complete our simple survey to enter


Choose the sea fishing gifts you most want this Christmas and win a £100 Fishtec voucher.

We’ve shortlisted some of the most popular products for you to choose from in our simple survey below.

To Enter
• Go to the short survey below.
• Add your email address – we need this to notify the winner.
• Scroll and click on the gift you most want in each price range.
• Click submit.

Once submitted you’ll be automatically entered into our free prize draw to win a £100 Fishtec voucher.

So what are you waiting for? It only takes 2 minutes…

Closing date: 5pm Thursday 16th November 2017

Terms and conditions

By entering into this free prize draw, all entrants agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions.

In the event that any entrant does not, or is unable to, comply with and meet these Terms and Conditions and the prize draw information, Fishtec shall be entitled at its sole discretion to disqualify such entrant, without any further liability to such entrant.

The closing date for this prize draw is 5pm Thursday 16th November 2017.

The winner will be notified by email, within 30 days of the closing date.

The entrant must provide a valid email address to enter the prize draw.

Email addresses will be used to notify the winner, and may occasionally be used for notifying the entrant of future promotions by BVG Group Limited.

Your details will not be shared with or sold to any third party companies.

To enter this prize draw you must be: (a) a UK resident; and (b) 18 years old or over at the time of entry.

This prize draw is free to enter and no purchase is necessary.

Fishtec may exercise its sole discretion to use the winner’s name for future promotional, marketing and publicity purposes in any media worldwide without notice or without any fee being paid.

This prize draw is not open to employees (or members of their immediate families) of BVG Group Limited.

The prize for our Most Wanted Xmas Gift survey is £100 worth of Fishtec vouchers. No cash alternative for the prize stated is offered.

Only one entry per person is permitted.

The winner will be chosen at random by Fishtec.

The judges’ decision will be final, and no correspondence will be entered into.

Winners will be notified by email. If winners fail to reply within 48 hours, Fishtec reserves the right to pick another winner.

If you have any queries relating to our terms and conditions please contact: c.thomas@bvg-airflo.co.uk

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