5 Fly Fishing Blogs To Follow In 2017

In this post we look at five great fly fishing blogs that we feel are worth following through 2017 and beyond…

The world of fly fishing blogging has shrunk a little in recent years, with the rise and increased use of Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets taking more prominence within the angling scene. There are however some really good fly fishing blogs still around on the internet, including some brand new ones that are regularly updated. Here we present 5 of the best.

1. Land of My Fathers …… A Fisherman’s Journey through Wales

Tony Mair has a mission. To catch a trout from every county in Wales. It doesn’t matter how big or small the fish are; as long as Tony catches one it counts and another Welsh county is ticked off the list.

Tony Mair with success in Rhondda Cynon Taff!

Tony Mair achieves success in Rhondda Cynon Taff!

Along the way Tony meets colorful characters and anglers from all walks of life who help him on his quest, whilst fishing Welsh rivers of natural beauty contrasted with the industrial urban waterways in the valleys of the south. Thoroughly enjoyable, this blog is as much about the people and places as fish and fishing itself.

We highly recommended you catch up on last years posts – there will be plenty more counties to tick off this year, so make sure you do your homework on the places where Tony has already cast a fly.

2. DK Fly fishing – A Nymphomaniac Down Under

Continuing the Welsh theme, former Wales river international Dean Kibble has a new fly fishing blog. Titled ‘A Nymphomaniac Down Under’. This is a reference to the infamous competition fly fishing team Dean was a member of for many years, winning numerous trophies along the way on the UK stillwater scene.

Dean Kibble enjoying life in NZ

Dean Kibble enjoying life in NZ

Dean is quite possibly ‘living the dream’. He recently emigrated to New Zealand’s South Island, with his wife Lisa (herself an avid fly fisher!) As a way of sharing the fishing experiences with the guys back home, this blog was set up to catalogue Dean and Lisa’s adventures in the anglers paradise of NZ.

With exploration and new venues in every post, this great blog captures a pioneer spirit of untapped fishing in a new land. Old habits die hard though – In a recent post, Dean gives us the low-down on how he won his first NZ fly fishing competition. Top angling Dean!

3. The Beardy Bros Fly Fishing

Beardy Neil and Beardy Paul are two brothers on a quest to become better fly fishermen.

The brothers don’t live near to each other, so the idea was to create a blog where they could share and store their knowledge of all the useful fly fishing info they came across whilst fishing and online.

The beardy brothers

The beardy brothers

As a result the blog has grown to became a great resource with no ulterior motive – just pure and simple fishing, with the ultimate aim of improving yourself on the water.

This stylish looking blog has everything from venue visits and fishery reports, to useful non biased fishing tackle reviews, videos and hints and tips. There really is something for everyone here.

Their fly fishing adventures look set to continue for 2017 in style, so make sure you keep up to date with this one, it’s cool.

4. Fulling Mill Blog

One of our favourite fly and accessory manufacturers, Fulling Mill have been running a blog for around two years now. In that time It’s rapidly become one of our most visited sites, with a diverse range of fly fishing subjects in it’s archives.

Fulling Mill flies ready for action

Fulling Mill flies ready for action

From fly tying and the history of the industry itself, to competition fly fishing in the UK, pike and saltwater action this blog has a lot of awesome stuff written by experts from all across the UK, Europe and beyond.

With a new post usually appearing at least once a week, this is one frequently evolving blog full of interesting fly fishing stuff – well worth a look.

5. The Unfamous Fly – Fly Fishing In Scotland and beyond…

A cracking, honest blog from Scotland full of useful stuff whether you fish the river or the lake. The Unfamous fly describes his blog as: ”The exploits of a nobody angler laid bare for all the world to see. The successes,the failures & the fun of fly fishing”

The unfamous fly

The unfamous fly

We can tell you that this is a superb blog indeed, with some seriously good wisdom and experience being passed on for all to enjoy.

Of particular note are the fishery reviews – some excellent info there for anglers living in or visiting Scotland looking for a nice venue. Plenty of Real life tackle reviews make for informative reading if you are  looking for at some new kit. A recent no-nonsense Czech nymphing video made for a very entertaining watch, with hopefully much more of the same ilk to come this year.

Want more fly fishing entertainment? Then why not check out our list of Fly Fishing E-Zines? Free quality online fishing magazines from all over the world.

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Obscure & Unusual Flies

Box of artificial flies

Have you got any unusual flies in your box?
Image: Shutterstock

When it comes to fly patterns, the possibilities are endless and the choice can be overwhelming.

So it’s no surprise many anglers stick to tried and tested patterns, but are they missing out?

We asked some of the best fly aficionados to send us their favourite unusual fly patterns. Take a look at these unsung heroes and find a new secret weapon for your fly box.

Crab fly

From Chris Ogborne

artificial crab fly pattern

Mud Crab pattern
Image: Chris Ogborne

“Saltwater fly fishing isn’t all about sand eels and bait fish. At certain times of the year my local estuary has an influx of little shore crabs and whilst many are alive the majority die and come floating in on the tide.

The bass love them and will mop them up in great numbers, so a floating or suspended artificial can do the trick. It’s hardly mainstream fly fishing, but for a short time it can be spectacular sport in the brackish water of the salt marshes.”

Chris Ogborne has represented and captained his country on the international fly fishing stage for over twenty years.

He offers guided saltwater fly fishing and game fishing across Devon and Cornwall. Take a look at what you can expect…

The Clifton

from Nick Hart

clifton artificial fly pattern

The Clifton pattern
Image: Nick Hart

“According to legend, it was tied and used on a day when the fishing was so tough that the Bristol anglers in question were close to throwing themselves off the Clifton suspension bridge!”

“The Clifton can be found somewhere in the depths of my fly boxes and whenever it goes on the leader I am instantly confident. It’s got a bit of everything including the old Stick Fly, a little bit of Viva and the more modern day Cormorant, plus I love that trigger point red/orange head with so much movement. It’s also a top early season pattern and open to all kinds of variation, including adding a little flash to the wing or using a modern synthetic as a substitute for the seals fur head.”

Based in Somerset, Nick has been a fly fishing instructor for over 10 years. In addition to his tuition and advice, Nick offers complete fly fishing packages such as his “River 2 Rock” three day fishing holiday.

Visit Nick Hart Fly Fishing to find out more about Nick’s trips.

CDC Caddis

from Stuart Minnikin

CDC caddies artificial fly pattern

CDC Caddis pattern
Image: Stuart Minnikin

“My favourite obscure fly would have to be my CDC Caddis. It’s a fly tied with a dubbed brown body and two bunches of CDC for the wing, one tied half way along the body and the other just behind the head.

I complete the fly with a few turns of thread dubbed with CDC fibres to give a leggy appearance. I use the fly as a search pattern from early summer through to October and fish go mad for it, however, it must float very high to be effective.

If it starts to get damp and sit down it loses it’s effectiveness and should be dried or changed. It is of course good in a Caddis hatch too.”

Stuart is a fully qualified fly fishing instructor offering guided fishing trips for trout and grayling on lakes and rivers in North Yorkshire. Take a look at Stuart’s full profile here, or visit his website Yorkshire Dales Flyfishing for more information.

Gorgeous George

from James Harrold

Gorgeous George artificial fly pattern

Gorgeous George pattern
Image: James Harrold

“The Gorgeous George is a great Scottish loch pattern fished either as an out and out dry, or a pulled wet just sub surface. It also works well in this part of the world (Norfolk) and can be very effective for Stillwater Rainbows down South.

I like to tie a few slight variations, by either changing the tail colour or dressing it up with an extra hackle or two depending on the level of buoyancy required!

A very versatile and effective fly and one that is always in my box.”

James owns and runs Rocklands Mere Fishery with his wife, Katie. The fishery offers both coarse and trout fishing in Norfolk. James is a GAIA qualified instructor and offers tuition to anglers of all levels, both in the fishery and further afield. See James’ full profile here.

Visit Rocklands Mere Fishery and take a look at the stunning species available in their idyllic Norfolk landscape.

(Rogan’s) Gadget

from Paul Kenyon

rogans gadget artificial fly pattern

Rogan’s Gadget pattern
Image: Norm Frechette

“The gadget was developed by the fly-tying legend Michael Rogan in the 1960’s. Originally used as a seatrout attractor pattern, it’s widely regarded as the first ever purpose designed saltwater pattern.

Over the years, anglers have caught on to the it’s versatility as a pattern. As an alternative to the original sea trout design, the gadget can be tied much smaller as a fry pattern – very effective in deep pockets of stillwater for fry-feeding trout.”

Paul Kenyon and his fly-fishing partner, Geoff Stephens, run Fly Fishing Devon. As registered fishing guides, Paul and Geoff help beginners and experienced anglers alike to make the most of fly fishing on Dartmoor and South Devon rivers.

The Polyfitus Olive

from Phil Ratcliffe

polyfitus olive artificial fly pattern

The Polyfitus Olive pattern
Image: Phil Ratcliffe

“This Polyfitus Olive has accounted for many a Grayling and the odd trout I must say. Ideal as a point or dropper fly when fishing deep faster sections of river as the heavy tungsten bead will get you down to target the fish.”

Phil operates out of the Cheshire area, as a fully qualified APGAI fly casting instructor & fly fishing rivers guide. When he’s not out instructing, Phil’s sharing his experiences and top tips on his fishing diary blog.

Take a look at Phil’s instructor profile, or visit his website to learn more about his casting lessons and guided trips.

The International Secret

from Andrew Cartwright

international secret artificial fly

The International Secret pattern
Image: Andrew Cartwright

“A fly that works well in all sizes and water conditions, it really does seem to glow in a river that the colour is dropping out, caught some very big grayling on it.”

Situated in the Upper Severn Valley at Caersws, Andrew has been fly fishing for more than 30 years. In addition to teaching children and adults in all types of fly casting, Andrew is also available for corporate sessions.

Visit acgameangling.com to book a session, or take a look at Andrew’s blog for the latest news from his fly fishing trips in Wales.

Wobbler Tube

from Rob Waddington

wobbler tube artificial fly

Wobbler Tube pattern
Image: Rob Waddington

“Rutland warden Paul Friend developed his own Tube Fly designed for rudder fishing. The foam body helps the fly rise and fall through the water levels so covering depth. When pulled, the fly stays on the same level as the sinking line, but when left static the pattern rises up.

This up-and-down motion attracts plenty of fish. According to Paul, the foam also makes the fly wobble slightly through the water. Its success rate is tremendous with Paul catching and returning a brown trout estimated between 12 and 14lb from Pitsford in Northamptonshire.

Many of his fishing pals, including Rutland’s Senior Warden John Seaton, have also taken big fish with Paul’s pattern.”

Founder of Rutland Water Fly Fishing, Rob boasts the Silver Award for best visitor experience in the East Midlands. Find all you need to know about Rob Waddington here.

(Harold’s) Grouse & Claret

from Stan Headley

Grouse and claret artificial fly

Grouse & Claret fly pattern
Image: Stan Headley

“This was a very popular fly in Western Isles back in the ‘80s, devised by Englishman Harold Howorth. It’s very effective for sea trout and salmon.”

Stan is a Scottish National Fly Fishing Champion, and has been a professional angler and guide since 1980.

Learn more about Stan Headley here, or you can buy some of his expertly tied trout patterns from Stan’s blog.

Take the Fishtec Fly Quiz

Test your knowledge of fly tying and take the Fishtec Fly Quiz. You’ll need to know more than the basics to score high with these flies.

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“Marmite” Fishing Tackle

marmite

Dividing opinion. What’s your “marmite” fishing tackle?
Image source: David Hunt

For every angler who loves having the latest kit, another will be busy shaking their head at it. Fishing tackle innovations are seldom embraced equally by everyone in the angling community. Dominic Garnett takes us on a quick tour of the fishing gear that divides opinion  – the “Marmite” of the fishing tackle world.

The Bite Alarm

Bite-alarm

Bite alarms – Love or hate?

Many years after their widespread adoption by anglers, these little boxes of joy (or disturbance) continue to provoke debate.

It was none other than the great Richard Walker who invented the electronic bite alarm. The idea wasn’t to promote “lazy” fishing though, but to detect runs at night. 

Have we become hooked on them? Many specimen hunters wouldn’t be without theirs and sadly, not everyone seems to know where the volume control is.

Centrepin Reels

centrepin-reel

Is old-school best or should the centrepin reel be consigned to history?

Old-school romantics love them and in the hands of a master, a centrepin reel can be poetry in motion. But for the less skilled, not so silky smooth; we’re talking long trotting or a tangle every five minutes!

Fish Finders

Fish-finder

Fish finder – the ultimate cheat?

Struggling to get a bite? Worse, have you no idea where the fish even are? A fish finder could be the answer. On large waters, a lot of us use them to help us identify features we can’t otherwise see.

But more and more anglers are also using fish finders on rivers and lakes where they’re much quicker than traditional methods for plumbing the depth. But is using a fish finder to locate your prey a clever tactic or does it show a lack of watercraft? After all, just because you know where the fish are, doesn’t mean you’ll be able to persuade them to bite.

The Bait Boat

Bait-boat

Are you a bait boater or do bait boats give you a sinking feeling?

Faced with long distances and awkward casts, some clever so-and-so wondered if he might use a radio-controlled boat to place his bait and rigs to the exact inch. A few years later we have high-tech devices and a debate that just won’t lie down. Are bait boats genius or cheating?

Dropshot Gear

Drop-shot-gear

Drop shot gear – best thing since sliced bread or pastime for the brain dead?

Who saw the whole dropshot trend coming? In the past three years or so it’s become all the rage. But are you a convert or just plain confused? The technique does take some getting used to, that’s for sure. It takes a lot more patience than standard lure fishing, nor is acute concentration and vertical jigging for small perch everyone’s cup of tea.

Underwater Fishing Cameras

Fishing-camera

Fishing cameras: innovation or intrusion?

What exactly goes on under the water while you fish? Not content with centuries of crackpot theories, some clever clogs decided to cast out a little film camera to take away the guesswork.

Unlike many of angling’s more high-tech trends, the British did it first with the FishSpy camera, a product purely designed for carp anglers. But is this understanding the water better, or killing any remaining mystery?  

Split Cane Rods

Split-cane-rod

Split cane: old-world charm or obsolete?

“Simply wonderful,” the traditional angler sighs. “Look at that old-world craftsmanship; lovely to play a fish on too.” But split cane rods are also pretty heavy and slow-actioned.

Where you stand on vintage tackle is a very personal thing and while split cane certainly has its romance, would you really favour it over carbon? Is it a joy to use, or more akin to replacing your new car with a horse and cart?

Further Information

What’s your take on “Marmite” tackle? Tell us what fishing equipment you love or loath via Twitter and use #MarmiteTackle

For more talking points on a weekly basis, check out Dominic Garnett’s column “The Far Bank” in the Angling Times, or discover his books and regular blog at www.dgfishing.co.uk

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Five Tips For Early Season Salmon Fishing

With over 20 salmon under his belt last season, Welsh all-rounder Tim Hughes certainly knows a thing or two about salmon fishing. In this blog post Tim shares his top 5 early season fly fishing tips for catching these elusive silver tourists. Read on to discover how best to bag yourself a springer!

An early season bar of silver

An early season bar of silver.

Tip 1: Get deep

Spring salmon like to rest up rather than travel rapidly, due to cold spring water temperatures, so it pays concentrate your efforts in deeper resting areas such as pool bodies and tail-outs. Deep and slow is often the key, salmon being cold blooded need the water to get up above 50 degrees before they start chasing flies higher in the water, but as temperatures increase be aware extra movement can help induce a take so it is worth carrying a streamside thermometer and checking the water throughout the day.

Tip 2: Use a modern Shooting head set up

Years ago spring salmon fishing was a real chore – heavy duty 15 foot 12 weight rods, full double taper sinking lines and a lot of shoulder aching effort was required to fish. Today shorter 14 foot rods teamed up with the modern shooting head lines such as Airflo Skagit compact G2 with one of the T series sinking tips or polyleaders to match the flow regime allow you to cast further, with less effort.

A modern set-up makes salmon fishing so much easier

A modern set-up makes salmon fishing so much easier.

Tip 3: Fly density and colour

Pay special attention to fly weight. Consider how your fly will sink and behave. Heavy tubes made of brass with coneheads are often the ones to reach for in your early season fly box. Large colourful patterns in orange, yellow and black are ones that will show up well in dirtier spring water. If you get your fly to the correct level the takes will come!

My recommended early season salmon fly list:

Cascade Brass Tube
Willie Gunn Feelers Brass Tube
RS Super Snaelda Cascade Conehead
Francis Brass Tube

Early season salmon flies

Early season salmon flies.

Tip 4: Do your research

Choosing the right beat is half the battle. Regularly check the online fishing reports, social media, forums and sites such as FishPal. Look at long term beat records and work out which beats historically do better in the spring. Don’t be afraid to ring the fishery booking office or contact the gillie/river keeper for updates and advice on fish location. Keep a close eye on the weather forecast and as the river starts to drop after a spring down pour the fish will be running – so make sure you get out there and make the most of it; a week later might be too late!

Tip 5: Check your tippet materials

There is nothing worse than losing a salmon due to a dodgy leader. Check and renew your tippet selection at the start of your season. Strong fluorocarbon is my choice spring fish aren’t leader shy – Airflo G3 in 15lb or Airflo Platinum in 20lb is a dead cert for spring fishing.

Spring on the river Wye

Spring on the river Wye.

 

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Back On The Sea Trout

Shooting season is over and the guns are cleaned, oiled and put away, time to turn my attentions back to the fly fishing.

The next few weeks is going to be a busy one at the vice for me, replenishing the fly boxes for the new season ahead, not only on topping up my salt water patterns but, on starting a fresh on a new batch of sea trout (sewin) flies.

Sea trout flies

Busy on the vice – Plenty of sea trout flies.

There was once a time I was addicted to sea trout fishing and I spent the best part of twenty years of my life solely targeting these magnificent creatures, with a number of productive rivers right on my doorstep most nights of the week I would be found sitting bankside waiting for the lights to go out.

A magnificent double figure sea trout

A magnificent double figure sea trout – fruit of an addiction.

When I say “Most nights of the week” I mean at least four or five and for a great part of it seven, I really can’t put in to words the effect these fish had on me, obsessed would be a understatement. Holding down a full time job and sea trout fishing is not ideal when you have such a obsession, I would try my hardest to limit my weekday sessions to around 1am but, of course, if the fish were on, my limit would go out the window, many a time I’ve found myself walking off the river and driving straight to work.

As I referred to in a past blog, I achieved about as much as I wanted to on the sea trout, targets were set and broken and I just felt the time was right to move on. After so many years at the game I did start to lose the enthusiasm for it, I was not getting that buzz I once was , It was time for a change and a new challenge. I dabbled with saltwater fly fishing for many years but, the past six years has seen all my efforts directed towards the sport and it’s been a blast!, the enthusiasm I was lacking and the buzz I was missing rekindle……So why the return to sea trout fishing?

A great reason to return to sea trout fishing!

A great reason to return to sea trout fishing…

Salt water fly fishing is so weather dependent around the South Wales coast that many times through a season I get blown off the water, for days, sometimes weeks with a persistent south westerly wind. Although I get plenty of time at the vice to tie flies during these periods my need/urge to be close to water waving a fly rod around, chucking a lure at something fishy is what I crave….I need that fix!

The other reason for my return to sea trout fishing was while fly fishing for mullet in a local estuary last season, the size of some of the sea trout that swam past me at this mark sure got the heart racing a little faster and rekindled some fond memories. They past with in feet of me in no more than eighteen inches of water, I could make out every beautiful detail of them, those spots, that shape, streamlined power, wow! That’s when I decided what I was going to do this year when conditions dictate I can’t hit the surf.

Worth staying up late for....

Worth staying up late for….

I won’t be going at them with the same conviction I showed all those years ago and most of my fishing will be concentrated around daytime/evening sessions, with night time forays limited to the weekends. I say that now but, who knows? With me, when it comes to fishing, anything can happen. Having been out of it for so long I’m really not sure what to expect? All I’ve had the past few seasons from the guys still at it is doom and gloom reports, there’s no doubt about it that sea trout are in decline and numbers have been steadily dwindling for many years despite the great efforts of a select few to turn things around. Anyway, enough of that, could be a future blog.

The water I’m going to be fishing (fishing most) is new to me, not new in the fact I don’t know of it, just that I have never sent a line across it. Why,I really don’t know it’s no more than a stone’s throw from the house. It’s a very intimate little river, boulder strewn with many a twists and turns, weirs, and some deep gorges. As well as the salmon and sea trout that run it there is also a healthy population of wild brown which will provide me with some sport. I’m quite sure it’s going to be a tough nut to crack and honestly don’t think it’s going to give up its inhabitants to me with ease, I’ve so much to learn about it, I could take a short cut and fish the rivers I know so well but, I’m really up for the challenge of this one.

Airflo Airlite v2 rod

Airflo Airlite v2 rod – on test.

I’m also really excited this year to be putting the new Airflo Airlite V2 fly rods to the test. I honestly think Airflo are on to a winner with this new range, which brings back the original blank from 9 years ago with re-tweaked and improved actions for 2017. I simply cannot wait to try them out on some hard fighting Welsh sea trout – watch this space!

Tight lines

Daz

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Back In the Game By Rene’ Harrop

While it is still winter here in the Rocky Mountain west, March is a time when I become serious about getting back on the water.

Whether on still or moving water, icing is the most limiting factor for fly fishing during the months of December through February. And while all of our lakes are still frozen solid, the Henry’s Fork is finally ice free.

Back In The Game

Back In The Game.

A stray blizzard or single digit temperatures are only temporary disruptions when the hours of daylight begin to equal those of darkness. However, in 2017 deep snow and tall ice banks along the river’s edge are a lingering impediment to accessing some of the more attractive parts of the river.

Island Park and the upper Henry’s Fork will have to wait for several more weeks but with less than half of the four foot snow depth forty miles upstream, the river near my winter home is providing some much needed relief to a long deprived angler.

Early Brown

Early Brown.

A bright, sunny day may not produce the best results in terms of midge or Baetis hatches but it is definitely the most comfortable time to be on the water. A day without overcast skies will usually find me drifting weighted nymphs in the shallower riffles with a six weight rod or swinging a streamer through the deeper runs with a seven weight. However, I look forward most to a day that shows promise of clouds and a temperature above 40ᵒ F. Dry fly fishing with my favorite four-weight is what I think about most through the months of deep winter, and I need these conditions to get back into my favorite game.

Although a rainbow approaching nine pounds in weight came on a March day many years back, most fish taken at this time of year are relatively modest in size. And with trout activity slowed by cold water temperature, a group of crossing whitetail deer may be the most interesting event of the day.

March Rainbow

March Rainbow.

While catching fish is always the primary objective, I am happy to again feel the push of the current on my legs and the presence of a good rod in my hand.

The river holds the smell of a spring not yet arrived but drawing near and the sound of its movement speaks of life.

Most of all, my mind is filled with all that lies ahead in a new season and the comforting knowledge that March is just the beginning.

Just The Beginning

Just The Beginning…

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Wade Safe – Tips for better Wading

With spring rapidly approaching, the new trout and salmon fishing season is just round the corner. Early season river fly fishing naturally involves wading, but before you charge waist deep into the flow you should take a read of our essential river wading tips.

Wade safe - in deep but not in trouble.

Wade safe – in deep but not in trouble.

Think before you get in – Think about how you are going to get in AND out of the water. Visually survey the stretch before you climb into the river. If you have no safe exit point, you could be in for rough time.

Cross in the right way  – When crossing the river angle yourself so you move diagonally down stream, with the current helping you rather than fighting against it. Move slowly side on if possible, so the water force is pushing against a smaller surface area. Remember to slightly lean into the current as you cross. As you go use your arms to help you balance.

Take short steps – Slide and shuffle your way across the river. Don’t stride or lift your feet high as you step or the current could push your balance out. The key is don’t rush – take your time and be safe.

Pack your wading belt – Using a wading belt will help should you end up in the drink.  Flooded waders will make you struggle to get back up and out of the river safely.  Also rather than your fishing day be over instantly, you wont ship as much water and hopefully remain fairly comfortable. Another benefit is they can offer a great lumbar support – for example the Airflo or Simms wading belts.

Check your wading boots – A set of good boots are vital. Over the previous season your wader studs may have worn down so its well worth replacing these at the start. This could save you an early season dunking!

Consider a wading staff – For early season, the rivers are often swollen with rain. A staff is a god-send and well worth the investment, especially if you are not so strong on your feet. A wading staff can also be used to probe the depths and look for ledges and drop offs in coloured up water.

IF you fall in – Turn over onto your back, an get your feet facing downriver as soon as you can. Float downstream and paddle to the nearest bank ASAP.  An inflatable fly fishing vest is a safe option for peace of mind, especially if your river is particularly large or dangerous.

Keep to your limits – If you feel like the current is too much, and the wading is uncomfortable for you simply don’t do it. Why take the risk?

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Waterproof Fishing Clothing Review – Airflo Airtex Bib & Brace

According to the weather forecast it said inclement for the morning, with light sporadic rain showers. It didn’t say driving rain and hail for 27 February 2017!

Yet here I am standing on the bank of Meadow Lake at Ellerdine Lakes facing up the downpour. There is a hill in the distance from Ellerdine, which has a saying attached to it. “if you can see the Wrekin, it’s going to rain. If you can’t see it, it’s raining”. Whatever the weather, we all just want to be able to keep on fishing. Through low air temperatures that freeze the fly line in the rod rings and chilled stiff fingers, that need the close attention of the lodge log burner. Having gear that matches up to your fishing ambitions, is something that we all want. Without breaking the bank too. I’ve used Airflo’s Airtex waterproof fishing clothing in the form of a wading jacket since July 2014 and as yet, touch wood not had a wetting.

Stuart wearing the Airflo Airtex clothing on Ellerdine lakes

Stuart wearing the Airflo Airtex clothing on Ellerdine lakes.

I knew that my old bib and brace were seeing their last few months out, so went ahead and bought the Airflo Airtex Bib & Brace for £99 from Fishtec. I’m 5ft 10” so opted for a large size. There is a sizing chart on the Fishtec website for more info.

These are olive and black with a full front zip and Velcro closure and zip legs again with Velcro touch pads for the all important weather resistant seal. Padded shoulder straps and bayonet clips offer great support at the shoulder.

Here’s the hype on the Airtex Bib & Brace:

The Airflo Airtex clothing ranges are designed for fly fishermen by fly fishermen. Made of durable fully waterproof tear resistant material in Airtex green with black reinforcement panels; these are fully breathable and extremely comfortable fishing garments cut for ease of casting and walking. The Airflo Airtex Bib ‘n’ Brace features wide, comfortable, elasticised braces that clip neatly and securely to the front of the bib, with the crossing point at the back forming a large, cushioned area for even greater comfort. Down at the ankles you’ll discover a gusseted zip for easy foot or boot passage and Velcro adjustment tabs to ease the way into your wellies. For your convenience, the Airtex Bib ‘n’ Brace also features a high quality full length waterproof zip.

  • Fashioned from high grade, tear-resistant materials
  • Wide braces with cushioned cross-over at the back
  • Gusseted zip at ankles for easy foot and boot passage
  • Light, warm and very comfortable
  • Low profile clips to the front
  • Reinforced stress points
  • Velcro gusset adjusters for smooth entry
  • Breathability 3000g/24hr.sm
  • Sizes: M-XXXL

From a fishing perspective they are super comfortable and offer up breathability that means your not sweating your head off. The knee and seat areas have extra protection for kneeling in the mud and don’t leech water up the material, when you’re stood in it releasing fish etc. I like the crossover shoulder straps, which stop the straps falling down and a full length chest zip for access to your inner clothing.

Simple, functional and breathable and they add a serious level of protection, for just when you need it most. Look at Airflofishing.com or search through Fishtec’s fly fishing section for more on breathable clothing and Airtex.

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Airflo Skagit Scout Fly Lines – Casting Tips By Tom Larimer

The new Airflo Skagit scout heads are sure to be popular this year for UK Sea trout and salmon anglers looking to use a lighter set-up, such as a single hand fly rod or lower line rated switch rod.

Scout heads are short and compact, meaning they are prefect for where back casting space is severely limited. They have just the right taper to punch out a heavy sink tip and a big fly if required. Above all, distance casting is made quick and supremely easy.

Tom Larimer, Airflo fly line designer and pro-spey caster has produced some great instructional videos featuring the new Scout heads. With superb tips for anglers looking to use shorter bellied shooting heads for their fishing, they are well worth checking out!

Scout Heads are available here.

Airflo Skagit scout

Airflo Skagit scout specs

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