2015 Airflo World Bank Masters

2015 Airflo World Bank Masters

Chris Jones Winner 2012

Fancy your chances of winning a £2,000 cash prize? Enter the 2015 Airflo World Bank Masters! 

The Airflo Bank Masters is now in it’s fourth consecutive year with the prize find growing year on year. With the first prize being £2000 (excluding other prizes), it’s easy to understand why this competition is still such a success!

With over 25 heats across the UK at recognised fisheries and still waters, and the opportunity to enter more than one heat to increase your chances of qualifying, why not enter the Airflo Bank Masters and try your hand at the fantastic cash and fly fishing tackle prizes?

Entry Fee: £29 – Which includes a free goody bag for your first entry only, then any additional entries are charged at £22 with no addition goody bag.

*Your free goody bag includes, an Airflo fly line and a pack of Iain Barr flies! (Worth well over £50 RRP)

Where can you fish?

The Final will be fished on the 18th of April 2015 at Elinor Trout Fishery

*Download your entry form here:
Airflo World Bank Masters Open Championships – Entry Form 2015

Filming the new Airflo Fly Fishing DVD

Filming the 2015 Airflo DVD

When it comes to fishing, there’s nothing better than breaking out your rods and reels, stringing your desired fly line through the eyes of your favourite rod and casting out into the unknown… But, for many anglers that are stuck for time, they turn to the Internet, or in our case, fly fishing DVDs.

For those of you who struggle to get out on a regular basis we’ve been filming the new Airflo/Trout Fisherman DVD on the prestigious Bristol Water fisheries, Blagdon and Chew Water – The birth place of fly fishing some would say.

Iain Barr, Chris Ogborne and Airflo’s director Gareth Jones get together to film the new Airflo fly fishing DVD which will be available Spring 2015 FREE with Trout Fisherman. With Chris’s knowledge, Iain’s competition pedigree and Gareth’s enthusiasm for fly fishing, this DVD will be one to look out for.

Filming the 2015 Airflo DVD

Both Gareth and Chris go through the ins and outs of bank fishing while Iain gives you the lowdown on reservoir fishing from the boat.

All three anglers talk about their experiences when bank fishing, giving you confidence in their ability and showing you exactly how they would approach the bank:

– Where to start at the lake
– What fly lines and fly fishing tackle to use for best presentation and distance
– Technical fishing clothing and luggage

Iain and Gareth are both extremely good, confident lake anglers, both competing at World level with Iain a previous World Champion, and Gareth lucky enough to get 3rd. Boat fishing is their THING:

– Where to start when boat fishing
– What fly lines to use for covering fish quickly and methods
– Technical fishing clothing and accessories

Filming the 2015 Airflo DVD

This new Airflo DVD is packed full of great techniques which you could put into practice on any lake in the country… and be successful.

Iain, Gareth and Chris give their top 10 lake fishing tips, with tips ranging from what colour flies to use when the fish go off to what knot to use to get the best movement and gain attraction.

The DVD isn’t just about fishing either, it features a whole selection of the new Airflo fly fishing tackle, featuring the new FlyDri luggage range, a new range of fly rods and a massive selection of accessories – More about that when the DVD comes out.

Still Water Fly Fishing

Rene Harrop Still Water Fly Fishing

The noticeable quiet of a late summer morning on still water is unlikely to become a routine experience for many who devote the majority of their fishing time to the rivers of Henry’s Fork country. However, most will submit to a welcome change of pace as the season begins its transition into autumn.

While certainly soothing in its own way, the murmur of moving water denotes a quicker pace in the rhythm of water influenced by gravity when applied to the behavior of trout and what is required in their capture on a fly rod. With constant motion attached to all that lives in this environment we can find ourselves motivated by a sense of urgency to make things happen rather quickly in the false sense that what is moving is actually leaving. On still water, it seems different.

Reflected on a liquid mirror, the dual image of land and sky and all else that lies on or close to an undisturbed surface brings a visual calm to the perception of water that seems only able to be moved by the wind. And it is in this morning calm that I begin to understand how those like my friend, Gareth Jones can become as strongly connected to the still water experience as I am to moving water.

From Gareth, I have learned that a lake possesses unseen currents beneath the surface and that underwater organisms such as insects and fish are by necessity, always moving. I know now that finding the correct zone with respect to the depth I am fishing subsurface patterns will improve my success rate. Also explained is that fishing 3 or 4 different flies on a long leader can make more sense than applying a single pattern when probing the depths of lake or pond. Also to be considered is a trout’s reluctance to pursue prey in the direction of a low angled sun. Not learned from Gareth, however, is the ability to repeatedly cast 90 feet of fly line while seated in an anchored boat – the guy is that strong – But his ability is only half of it. Using and casting with the correct fly fishing tackle is the other half, you try punching a 4wt out over 90feet in consecutive casts throughout the day and you’ll know about it!

While I do not necessarily find dry fly fishing on still water to be more satisfying than the sudden weight of an unseen, subsurface take, I do confess to appreciating the visual excitement of fishing to an ever moving surface feeder.
Rene Harrop Still Water Fly Fishing
Late summer is prime time for hatches of Callibaetis and Trico mayflies on many of our local lakes and reservoirs. Damsel flies and meaty terrestrials like hoppers, beetles, and winged ants also become active and available in this time frame, and this combined menu can bring the eyes of hungry and opportunistic trout toward the surface.

In calm conditions, the location of a rising trout in still water is often determined by sound as much as sight. The audible gulp as an insect is taken from the surface is a still water feature that relates to quiet, although calm is not always part of the package.

Perhaps due to a sensitivity to overhead danger from predators, still water trout usually display a reluctance to linger near the surface following a rise to a floating food source. And because they quickly disappear from sight and normally obey no defined feeding path, much guesswork is involved with regard to where the next rise will appear. In this situation, relaxed, efficient casting can give way to frantic flailing as a target fish takes a natural only a foot from your offering or turns to feed in a direction different from your hopeful guess. The real chaos occurs when you become surrounded by un-patterned feeding and try to change the direction of the cast in mid-stroke. Maintaining discipline and composure may be the most difficult aspect of this type of lake fishing, and a take is nearly always hard earned.

Rene Harrop Still Water Fly Fishing
Like river fish, still water trout will often cruise the shoreline in search of what is often a random assortment of aquatic and terrestrial food items. Because water is typically more shallow along the edges a longer cast is often needed to avoid spooking trout that are more comfortable in greater depth. A more linear feeding path helps to simplify the task of getting the fly in front of the always moving target but careful calculation must be applied to placing it at a point that matches the feeding pace. Efficiency is paramount when fishing to a traveling fish that may allow only one or two casts before moving out of range.
In the right light conditions, subsurface feeders can also be spotted as they prowl the edges for nymphs and other underwater life forms. Sight fishing on still water with weighted fly patterns is especially exciting when the size of the objective is known and the reward of a perfect cast is as visual as the rise to a dry fly.

Rene Harrop Still Water Fly Fishing
As one whose experience and expertise lies mainly in the details of fishing moving water, I have only respect and gratitude for those still water specialists like Gareth Jones who has taught me so much. This particularly applies to those times when their lessons result in a special catch that would not happen otherwise. Some of my most memorable trout in recent years have come while applying those shared techniques on local lakes like Henry’s and Sheridan. Hebgen Lake and Island Park Reservoir are also productive and enjoyable still waters as are numerous smaller lakes in the higher elevations of this region west of Yellowstone.

While the Henry’s Fork and, to a lesser extent, other rivers continue to own the majority of my heart, there will always be room for those quiet mornings on still water which, ultimately, are not so different after all.

Rene Harrop Still Water Fly Fishing

Cwm Hedd Fly Fishing Report 29/06/14

Kieron Jenkins' Cwm Hedd Article

Kieron Jenkins’ Cwm Hedd Article

Check out Kieron Jenkins’ article on Cwm Hedd in the July edition of Total Fly fisher http://www.totalflyfisher.com/current-issue

TAPP Open day at Cwm Hedd– free fly fishing coaching

Torfaen Angling Participation Project are running an open day at Cwm Hedd on Saturday August 2nd, where free fly fishing coaching for anglers of all abilities will be available on an informal basis – All fly fishing tackle will be supplied and available for all participants to use. All ages and abilities are welcome. To register your interest please contact Bob Mayers on bmayers@grouse.plus.com so that he can ensure that a sufficient number of coaches are available. Bob’s also entered the British Legion comp at Cwm Hedd in November, so that’s another place gone!

This week at Cwm Hedd
The hot days inevitably make for difficult fishing, and like many fly fisheries this has led to a recent reduction in numbers of anglers attending. Every cloud has a silver lining though: low attendance results in stock levels being very good indeed, as well as the rainbows getting plenty of rest.

For those anglers undeterred by the heat, around half are blanking, especially in the daytime, whilst the other half are striking windows of opportunity where the fish turn on, reporting that the fish are still fighting hard and not showing any signs of stress.

The fish are closely monitored and inspections of the fish taken show them to still be in excellent condition, so the usual summer shut down is on hold for the time being, although there may be an adjustment to opening times in the next few weeks.

There are many ups and downs to running a fishery, but one of the biggest pleasures at Cwm Hedd is the camaraderie that exists between anglers, who are always pleased to share tips and discuss tactics. It takes a number of visits to get to know a fishery and Cwm Hedd is no exception, with regular anglers more than happy to advise new customers.

Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings are generally recommended at the moment, although regular Keith Cox prefers to battle with the day time heat. It just shows that you never can tell for sure when is the best time to come as Keith is the top angler of the week, taking one on each of his two day time visits and returning five. Keith favours an intermediate line and took most on a black and green tadpole, but also had success with an orange blob. Another regular Paul Elsworthy took one and released four early on Saturday on a montana, a black and green daddy and a bloodworm, recommending a very slow retrieve.

Talented young anglers Jacob Mills and Ben Jackson are also regulars, each taking one on damsels and floating lines on Saturday evening, with Jacob returning another on a shipman’s buzzer. Clive Murray took one and released two on a black and green fritz; Ken Bowring took 2 on a small white lure and a sinking line, whilst Sally Ann Iles preferred the Airflo Di-3 sweep and a mini-cat. Just to emphasise that variety is the key, John Belcher opted for an orange shrimp and a floating line, while Michael Collins and Lee Davies each took one on buzzers, Michael on a black buzzer and Lee on a red buzzer with yellow cheeks. Roy Western enjoyed his Sunday evening at Cwm Hedd taking one and returning two on a bloodworm and a floating line from the platform at the tip of the main island.

Tagged fish

The tag fish has still not been caught, so the prize money of £200 is being equally split to fund prizes for the British Legion raffle and the Cwm Hedd Christmas raffle. The additional £251 collected from entries will be donated to Velindre Cancer Centre. Many thanks to all who have participated in the tag fish competition. When anyone catches the tag fish they will now win a refund on their day ticket.

Open Wed/Thurs 7am-5pm last admission 3pm; Fri/Sat/Sun 6 am -9.45 pm: last admission 6pm (ring before 5.45 if you definitely want to come but can’t make it by 6). Tel 07813 143 034 anytime, or lodge: 01633 896854 during fly fishing opening hours. Evening ticket £13.50 available from 5.45pm

Bassaleg Newport NP10 8RW; 5 minutes from J 28 M4

www.cwmhedd.co.uk  https://www.facebook.com/cwmheddlakes

Cwm Hedd Fly Fishing Report 22/06/14

Cwm Hedd Fishing Report 22 June

Cwm Hedd fly fishing report week ending 22nd June – I caught my first rainbow!

As much as we are all generally enjoying the lazy hazy days of summer, day anglers have struggled to catch in the intense sun and heat. Most instead took advantage of the late evening opening on Friday Saturday and Sunday at Cwm Hedd, fishing til sunset and beyond.


I am delighted to report that on a glorious mid summer’s eve, as the sun dipped towards the horizon, a good dose of beginner’s luck saw me getting a passable cast out and hooking my first rainbow. The site of this surprising and unexpected feat (at 9.10pm) was a platform behind the main island, where a number of rainbows had been rising. I’d like to think I targeted the fish, as I had been attempting to do this with others (probably frightening several away in the process). The truth is that I was so excited by the whole event that my mind has gone completely blank, although I yelled loudly enough when I hooked it to bring John Belcher, Derek Mills and his grandson Jacob running to help with instructions as to how to bring it in without mucking it all up and losing it (many thanks). Derek was ready with the net and John filmed the event unfolding. Later it transpired that the lense cap was still on, so no photographic evidence of my fish-catching debut sorry! With the fish in the net and mission accomplished I asked John to release the fish for me as I was so grateful for its selfless act, the Airflo fly fishing tackle I recently purchased from Fishtec also performed brilliantly.

Thanks also to Sal, who a week or so ago had given me a red bloodworm with an assurance that it would catch me a fish, as indeed it has on its second outing, on a floating line Derek, Jacob, and John had already taken fish so we were a very happy band returning to the lodge. Mike James who had to leave just before the excitement had also taken a fish on an App’s bloodworm, a fly that had brought him 3 fish earlier in the week and others in previous weeks.

Ken Bowring was the top angler of the week, taking 2 and returning 3 on a fast intermediate fly line with a white lure. On his first visit to Cwm Hedd, Terry O’Connor took 2 and released 1 on a diawl bach and a floating line. John Belcher’s evening visits have each brought him fish, on a light brown buzzer, blue shrimp and a stonefly, floating line.

Tip top fish

The fish are still in excellent condition and fighting well; there is an abundance of blue and olive damsels emerging, with floating lines, damsels, buzzers and diawl bachs recommended in the evening; sinking lines and plenty of perseverance recommended in the day.

The Med comes to Cwm Hedd ( ice cream is now available in the lodge)

Weed is under control on the lake, following the introduction of the eco-friendly blue dye (‘Dyofix C Special’) which has turned the lake water a Mediterranean blue and is hard at work suppressing further growth. The platforms in front of the lodge running left around the bay and the main island around to the far bank have been cleared and are all fishable and we can now pull unwanted previous growth out in the shallower areas at a more leisurely place due to the dye. There is a crested grebe nesting off the small island so we’ve had to leave the weed there for the time being so as not to disturb the nest.

Tag fish
Taggy the tag fish is still there, so the £200 tag fish prize is still up for grabs. £1 entry. If no one catches the tag fish by the end of June half the prize money will be put towards raffle prizes for the British Legion comp in November and half towards the Christmas raffle prizes (sounds a bit weird to mention Christmas in June!)

Open Wed/Thurs 7am-5pm last admission 3pm; Fri/Sat/Sun 6 am -9.45 pm: last admission 6pm ( but ring if you definitely want to come but can’t make it by 6).

Evening ticket £13.50 Fri/Sat/Sun available from 5.45pm

Tel 07813 143 034 anytime, or lodge: 01633 896854 during fly fishing opening hours. I might be out on the lake, so ring my mobile if no reply in the lodge.

1000’s of Elver Eels Die

As the Elver eels migrate through the Shannon waterway towards Lough Erne, thousands of critically endangered eels die in a trap that was supposed to help their migration past the hydroelectric power station at Ballyshannon.

After a 4,000+ mile journey across the Atlantic, these elver eels were confronted by the power station at Cathaleen’s fall. It was said that the two traps which capture the eels for transportation to Lough Erne, became full and the eels were starved of oxygen. These eels are not often caught on traditional coarse, sea or fly fishing tackle, but can fall foul to a well presented bait.

It’s understood that the traps are checked each day, but over the bank holiday weekend there was a major run of eels up the river Erne, of which, most employees were off work and the traps hadn’t been checked.

This unfortunate incident resulted in the death of 112kg of juvenile eels.

Elvers, photo/Department of Environmental Conservation.

Elvers, photo/Department of Environmental Conservation.

The European eel is a critically endangered species, and commercial fishing, on many waterways was banned following an EU directive to try to reverse a 90% decline in stocks since the 1970s.

Eels migrate up to 4,000 miles from breeding sites in the Sargasso Sea across the Atlantic to Europe where they live for between five and 20 years in freshwater, before migrating back across the Atlantic to spawn.

Scientists who have been studying eels have reported an increase in the numbers of juvenile eels returning to European waters in recent years.

Airflo World Bank Masters 2014

Airflo Bank Masters Winner

Airflo Bank Masters Winner 2012  – Chris Jones

Fancy your chances of winning a £2,000 cash prize? Enter the
2014 Airflo World Bank Masters! 

The Airflo Bank Masters is now in it’s third year running, and with a first prize fund of £2000, it’s easy to understand why this comp is such a success!

With over 25 heats across the UK at recognised fisheries and still waters, and the opportunity to enter more than one heat to increase your chances of qualifying, why not enter the Airflo Bank Masters and try your hand at the fantastic cash and fly fishing tackle prizes?

The entry fee is just £27, with a free goody bag for your first entry, then any additional entries are charged at £23 with no addition goody bag.

Your free goody bag includes, an Airflo fly line and a pack of Iain Barr flies! (Worth over £50 RRP)

Where can you fish? Check out : Airflo Bank Master Championship Heats

The Final will be fished on the 13th of April 2014 at Elinor Trout Fishery

*Download your entry form here:
Airflo World Bank Masters Open Championships – Entry Form 2014

Airflo Super-Dri Lake Pro Fly Lines

The Super-Dri Lake Pro has been designed for the serious lake angler, utilising Airflo’s standard DELTA taper, the line casts effortlessly, turns over extremely well and shoots to the distance will little effort. The most serious casters will benefit immensely for the taper design of this line, a medium to long front taper lets for great stability through the cast, keeping your line speed high with extremely tight loops. The Super-dri Lake pro also lends itself to the lesser casts, giving the novice angler a great, easy casting line, a great addition to our fly fishing tackle.

Complete with Airflo’s patented ridge design and legendary PU coatings, you can expect these Airflo Super-Dri range to last longer than any other line you have and to perform as well as any fly line you will cast.

What are the key benefits of Super-Dri?

  • High riding – Superb float-ability.v
  • Zone Technology – Low compression hauling zone
  • Ultra supple coating for improved handling
  • Micro loops both ends

Learn more about the Super-dri Lake Pro fly line here



Filming Airflo’s Fly Fishing Product Videos

Recent visits Tim and Todd have been with us here at the Airflo factory in Brecon. We’ve been filming the ‘Airflo Story’ which is a run-down of who we are and what the company is about, whilst Gareth delves into detail about the technologies and passion which goes into designing and making all of our fly lines.

I was fortunate enough to be invited along to Blagdon Water and also to the River Avon. These two idyllic locations are the said to be the birthplace of modern fly fishing in the UK. Blagdon was the first stocked rainbow trout fishery in the UK and the Avon was amongst one of the first chalkstreams to see a dry fly. We thought what better places are there to film our fly fishing tackle videos than the places which have had such an influence on what fishing tackle we make?

The river Avon flows seamlessly through 96km of land before it hits the English channel, rising from the county of Wiltshire and flowing through Salisbury, Hampshire. Our beat for the day had been organised through Bill and William at Famous Fishing, a pristine three mile stretch of well groomed countryside.

Hampshire Avon

As we turned up at the water the fish were already on the move. Trout and grayling lying harmlessly along side one another happily feeding on small crustations and insects from the bottom. The trout however were easily spooked, whilst the grayling were resilient to us being there, within a minute they were back on the feed. After setting up our fishing tackle and Todd his camera kit, we headed off to the pump house pool to get the first of the interviews under-way whilst the sun was low.

Airflo's Gareth Jones

Once the Interviews were complete we headed to the river armed with only one rod and a box of dry flies. Todd was always a few steps behind with the camera as we worked the runs searching for rising fish. Some pools we came across a lot of fish taking from the surface, others, they were stagnant on the bottom. Being so late in the season we didn’t really see any significant fly hatch, but there were the odd few small olives and we’d captured one mayfly on its journey downstream.

Gareth and Tim filmed some great product videos, showing the technical side of our range of trout fly lines, when to use them and why each line is vital to any fly fisherman’s armoury.

As the day wore on we get some good fish for the camera, the latter part of the day produced trout ranging between 1 and 3lbs and also a few Grayling up to 2lb. As the olives started to die off and the light faded it was time to pack up the camera kit and head to Heathrow ready for the departure of the Americans.

Keep an eye out in the next few months for the ‘Airflo Story’

Written by Kieron Jenkins

Iain Barr Competition Diary

September is a big month for competitions including the Lexus European Championships which were held on Rutland Water.

To say the fishing was tough would be an understatement. Having fished the 2 day final I had just 6 takes and 2 follows in 16 hours fishing. A lot of anglers blame their flies, tactics or even fly fishing tackle, but it’s usually none of them, it’s all about finding the level and hoping the fish are there. Especially at this time of year.

In competitions you have to make some tough decisions, get it wrong and it can all be over but considering how tough it was I opted to target the bigger fish in the hope that if I got one they would be bigger than 2 of any stock fish that were caught. It paid big dividends as I landed a 30 year personal best on Rutland, a 8lb 2 1/4 oz Brown. On the first day I landed a magnificent 5lb 1oz Rainbow from the very same spot.


Although the fish had been feeding on fry it readily took a sz 10 Plain Cruncher fished on an Airflo mini tip in 3 foot of water! Fish this time of year are looking to pack on maximum weight for the lean timed ahead and become more of opportunists. As the water cools the fry move in and the trout follow. Corixa can be prolific this time of year so look for weed beds which will hold fry and corixa and the fish wont be far away.

Always ensure you keep on the move and look for signs like seaguls that indicate fry near the surface, possibly chased there by hungry trout beneath. Or simply look for the explosive thrash on the surface as the fry leap for safety. Many people confuse corixa feeders with fry feeders. The Corixa feeders tend to ‘push’ water for a few feet as it chases the darting corixa as opposed to an isolated explosion of attack for fry.

This time of year gives you the best chance of a grown on fish. Ensure you use strong fluorocarbon. I always use 10lb Sightfree G3 this time of year as it’s very strong and ultra clear in the clearing waters. There is no more powerful rod than the Enigma III so strap up with your 10lb G3, Enigma III and get fishing.

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