Tag Archives: fishing tackle

Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary Late August 2014

bass and eel littelstone Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary Late August 2014

Don’t you just love this drop in temperature, strong wind and a rough sea – Lots of anglers are rubbing their hands together at the prospect of autumn arriving and an improvement in the shore sea angling. It is though a time to bite the bullet and get out there in some uncomfortable conditions with an onshore wind and sea invariably the time to fish most venues. After the calm sunshine of summer a blustery rain swept beach can be difficult, BUT like all things it eventually becomes the norm and we all get back into winter mode. Time for the heavier fishing gear and time to break out those 7oz fixed wire grip leads, bait clips and the more powerful beachcaster rods. There is no doubt that from September onwards shore fishing is not for whimps with wands, it’s a time when casting distance and keeping a lead where it lands is very important. But it’s also a time when lots of novices catch their biggest ever bass with the species picking up a short cast big bait and so let’s start there and look at the prospects for a giant bass.

Big bass are usually solitary because the rest of their shoal have been caught or died. But there are enough still around to ensure that some lucky angler will nail a lunker in the next month or two. Luck plays a big part because bass are caught really close to the sea edge and rarely at long range. So the early winter cod angler fishing a giant bait in the edge is the one with the best odds of catching a big bass and that’s the novice. Few experienced cod anglers will deliberately fish a big bait close in for cod and so the novice with his inadequate cast is the most likely to get that lunker bass. That is unless you deliberately target a big bass by fishing close in. AND the best way to do that is with a live bait. Pick a calm, dark night and a steep deep beach venue and hook on a small pout and fish it in the first twenty for the waters edge. Keep the noise and light flashing to a minimum and you may catch a big bass. Often at this time of year the bass arrive on a venue because anglers are returning small fish or gutting mackerel etc. This especially as dusk and darkness arrives.

A favourite way to target bass is to slide a short trace down the main line of a rod cast out with a lip or tail hooked pouting on a strong 3/0 so that it floats in the edge.

Lots of anglers will now be thinking about cod and this summer many regions have seen an improvement in codling stocks. The trouble is that this has happened before with lots of codling in August, but by October they have gone. Fish over the size limit are easy prey for the gill nets and trawlers and it’s these that decimate the codling shoals. The bigger cod are very thin on the ground and usually don’t show until November and December.

Another fact of autumn, its better described as the start of winter, is that waterproofs and shelters return to the sea fishing tackle essentials. Options include the full Hurricane shelter which is ideal for those contemplating a marathon beach session over the complete tide, or a brolly which is a more portable shelter and is especially suited to the mixed weather of this time of year. I prefer the umbrella for the beaches in early autumn, the cheaper Hardware umbrella is ideal, especially where lots of moving with the tide is required, take a luggage strap and strap it to your tackle box, even better to your seat harness. The cheaper green brolly is lighter and more compact and can be erected quickly. OK it’s not the full Monty of the shelter but it’s great for a short session or the occasional shower. Once the weather deteriorates, then I switch to the TF Gear Force 8 brolly which is a bespoke sea angling umbrella like no other. OK others also have wings to widen the protection area, but the Force 8 has a removable cover, tough non metal frame and pockets for the shingle etc to hold it down.

Waterproof wise I prefer the full jacket and bib and brace suit – it goes without saying that being able to take the jacket off helps control temperature when the sun comes out and that the full sallopettes trousers not only keep you warm but clean!

Make no mistake in a few weeks your will need that protective clothing and shelter – we have been spoilt for weather this summer and the winter could well bring some shocks!

Having recently switched to fixed spool reels and braid main line I have to say what a revelation that has been. Bites are bolder, fish pull more and my sea fishing is more enjoyable. For years I tried braid on a multiplier, but it just does not work, but micro braid on a fixed spool reel is another ball game and I recommend those of you out there thinking about a switch to braid, go ahead but only with a fixed spool reel.

Codling and eel from the pier at Dover Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary Late August 2014

Tight lines,

Alan Yates

The Hardcore Boilie Air Dry Bag

Drying your boilies – whether you’re on the bank or at home – has never been easier with this boilie air dry bag. 

The TF Gear boilie air dry bag gives your bait complete circulation to dry out. With its easy dry mesh construction this ingenious piece of fishing tackle can be handle-hung or stood on its base to get the very best ventilation. Once your boilies have dried off, the large or standard TF Gear boilie air dry bag will continue to keep them fresh, firm and always in peak condition.

View the TF Gear Boilie Air Dry bag here

boiliebag The Hardcore Boilie Air Dry Bag

Job Vacancy at Fishtec!

jobvacancy Job Vacancy at Fishtec!

Fishtec Sales Advisers needed

If you live within a commuting distance of our Brecon HQ, and you are a keep angler there may be a role for you in the Fishtec team!

In this fast paced role you will process postal, internet and telephone orders for a wide variety of fishing tackle. Key elements of the role are helping customers with product advise queries through telephone sales, customer service aftercare, and processing internet and postal orders orders.

Candidate Profile

  • Excellent communication skills both written and oral.
  • Excellent organisation skills.
  • Energetic and results orientated.
  • Able to work under own initiative.
  • Enthusiastic, ambitious and self-motivated.
  • Effective written and oral communication skill.
  • Previous experience working in a call centre a distinct advantage.

Please send a CV to customerservice@fishtec.co.uk

http://www.bvg-airflo.co.uk/bvg-airflo-vacancies.cfm 

Airflo Switch Black Reel Impresses at Chirk

Blog 3 Airflo Switch Black Reel Impresses at Chirk

“Tom slips a lovely bow into the net in no time!”

After a few dismal competition performances I decided to really get bet to basics in my fishing, I was totally over complicating things chopping and changing every five minutes and I was spending more time faffing out of the water than I was actually fishing.

With this in my mind I decided to venture out to a few small Stillwater fisheries situated around the North West. One of the venues I visited was a stunning fishery called Chirk Trout Fishery nestled in the heart of the north wales valleys close to Llangollen and the Welsh Dee. The fishery itself consists of two fly fishing lakes, a bait pool and also fishing rights on the river Ceiriog that runs through the fishery. One of the reasons I chose this venue was the vast variety of trout the fishery stocked. In both lakes there are Rainbow, Brown, Golden, Blue, Tiger and American brook trout all reared on site. Not a bad variety hey? The lakes are around an acre and a half in size, gin clear, with a maximum depth of 12ft. The fishery is renowned for its prolific dry fly sport, and on my arrival it didn’t fail to disappoint with fish rising everywhere. The weather was perfect with a light breeze and clear skies, so back to basics I went and dry fly fishing was the tactic for the day.

I was adamant to not over complicate things so I went for a one rod set up. I chose the 10’ Sage XP 7# a fantastic rod and great for dry fly fishing. I was also trying out the new Airflo Switch Black Cassette Reel, this reel is fantastic and truly stunning to look at. It accommodates all my lines perfectly and is very light when casting, it’s a fantastic addition to any competition angler, as the unique cassette spool is extremely easy to change lines, and save a lot of time in doing so. Now it was time for my line choice. One thing I was noticing was that a lot of the fish were rising right in the centre of the lake, and for a lot of people they would be out of casting range I had a secret weapon, the new 40+ Expert floating line now with super dri technology. This would be the difference of me catching or blanking. Not only does this line fly out but the presentation and ability to hook up at long range would inevitably help me have a fantastic days sport.

After tackling up and a short walk I started fishing on the left hand side of the main fly lake, casting straight into the wind. I had the beautiful river Ceiriog running behind me and plenty of fish rising in front of me. After just watching the water I was able to pick out a few fish that were rising confidently.

I was fishing 9ft of 6lb Airflo Sightfree G3 to my first dropper then 6ft to the point fly, on my dropper I had a big rubber legged Daddy long legs and on the point I was using a JC Diawl Bach. I would be using the daddy as a sight indicator throughout the day, but was confident that it would take fish too and I wasn’t disappointed. I cast out straight into the wind which was effortless with the 40+ line and let everything settle. After ten seconds I began to slow figure of eight, barely moving the line just staying in touch letting the wind push the line and flies towards me. There was a swirl at the daddy but no take, then the daddy shot under the water and I struck. Fish on!! The first fish of the day was a stunning 1lb rainbow trout and after an acrobatic fight the fish slid over the net with the JC Diawl Back firmly set in its top lip. I carried on fishing this method and took 6 fish within 20 minutes.

IMG 9915 Copy Airflo Switch Black Reel Impresses at Chirk

It then went quiet so I decided to change the point fly to a small immature damsel. The daddy was still acting as a sight indicator and was still attracting a lot of fish. If the fish didn’t take the daddy or got spooked it wasn’t long before the daddy shot under, as the trout had homed in on the point fly. After an hour of fishing I was on 15 stunning fully finned rainbow trout. The fishing was on fire, with trout hammering the daddy and the damsel. After 3 hours of unbelievable fishing I called it a day. The light was beginning to fade and I was overwhelmed with what can only be described as a red letter day. A short late afternoon dry fly session was exactly what I needed to restore my confidence and understand that complicating things is not necessary. I kept the same tactic throughout the day only changing the point fly when it went quiet and it worked unbelievably well, with me finishing on 28 trout returned. The fish weren’t massive but they were fantastic fighters and stunning to look at. A huge advantage was without doubt the 40+ line as a couple of anglers blanked as the fish were out of casting distance but for me casting this line was effortless and the presentation was perfect.

It was an incredible short fishing session at a truly picturesque fishery. Keeping my fishing tackle to a minimum paid off, and persistence and patience helped land a lot of fish. The main reason I was catching was that I was constantly fishing. It sounds so silly but not spending time on the bank out of the water chopping and changing helped me land a hell of a lot of fish. Something so simple but extremely effective helped contribute to a real red letter days fishing the dries and nymphs.

Airflo Sniper Budget Fly Reel

The Airflo Sniper Fly Reel is an incredible reel at a budget price point.

If you’re putting a fly fishing outfit together with a limited budget, you need not look further than the Airflo Sniper fly reel. At just £29.99 with a FREE Velocity fly line.

The Sniper reel has been designed by top anglers here at Fishtec, to offer fishermen on a tight budget a quality, lightweight fly reel. Boasting great looks and a superb build quality featuring a lightweight frame, the Sniper fly reel can hold up to 100 meters of 20lb backing along with a full 30 yard fly line due to a generous large arbor.

 

Sea Trout Fishing Tackle Setup

 

P1010298 525x346 Sea Trout Fishing Tackle Setup

Sea trout are funny things, they tend to make human beings obsessive and with the sea trout season nearly upon us, I for one are one of those who are obsessed and cant wait to be back out on the river. It’s hard graft early on in the season as there are not so many fish around, the weather is usually a bit groggy but going through a pool at night, waiting for the first heart stopping take of the season cannot be beaten.

Unfortunately I haven’t picked up a fly fishing rod in months. It’s been a very long winter with some terrible weather and Im hopefully that it will settle down soon. To keep me somewhat sane through the closed season, I’ve dug out my fishing equipment and started to get everything in order.

I like to use two fly rods at night, with my favourite being the Airlite from the Airflo range. For the past three seasons or so I’ve been using these almost religiously and find these rods will do everything I want them too. The two I use are, 10ft 7/8 weight, and the 9ft 6′ 7/8 weight. Each rod allows me to cast well and in tight spaces. Both are kitted out with Airflo V-lite 7/9 fly reels, loaded with a set of Forty Plus Lines – slow intermediate, fast intermediate, and a DI3. I find this set up ideal and the 40+ lines cover everything that I need them to, whether it’s a short cast or long cast at night, or for finding the right depth while fishing through a pool.

My preferred leader for night fishing is either Maxima ultragreen in 12lb, or Airflo sightfree extreme in 15lb. I started using the sightfree extreme last season and found it to be very strong, especially when you hook the odd tree on the opposite bank!

Flies wise, I would normally use tubes between 1 and 2 inch including a few large singles at the beginning of the season, and as the season progresses the fish become more active and a surface lure, depending on weather conditions, can produce some decent action. I’ve had some good fishing as early as the second week of April on a surface lure, so it’s worth mixing your tactics up a bit. Generally though, I would use two tubes, or a tube and a big single on the dropper as we start the new season.

I like to use a headlamp with a red and white light. The red light is great for using close to the water, and doesn’t effect your night vision as much as the white light. In my fishing bag I usually have a spare jumper in case it get’s a bit chilly, a couple of 5ft Airflo polyleaders fast or extra fast  if I need to get the fly down a bit deeper, a spare headlamp and something to drink.

I’m looking forward to getting out on the river and tightlines to all for 2014!

The First Rise By Rene’ Harrop

Rise The First Rise By Rene’ Harrop

The First Trout Rise of 2014 – Bonnie Harrop Photos

For a fly fisher, surviving winter at high elevation is usually an arduous and inconsistent process. Snow and bitter cold temperatures can dominate the weather for months at a time and a visit to the river is often times only to watch through the months of December, January, and February.

With ice and cold winds as limiting factors, finding a window of opportunity for even a few hours of deep water nymphing or streamer fishing can be rare if human comfort assumes a role in determining whether to fish or stay indoors. Gradually, however, the daytime hours lengthen and subzero temperatures eventually become a casualty of the calendar. And as an ice bound river begins to regain its flowing character, there comes a glimmer of expectation for the first true sign of an eventual spring.

Although the timing of conditions suitable for dry fly fishing can vary from year to year, the sight of the first rise of a new season is always something to savor. And while the source of surface interest among trout in late winter is invariably of a size that dictates keen refinement in all aspects of fishing tackle and skill, nothing in the entire year is more welcome than the humble midge.

While chironomids on local still waters and elsewhere can be realistically imitated on a hook as large as size 12, the term midge is an appropriate description when they are found on moving water. Seldom larger than size 20, midges are available to trout in the Henry’s Fork and most other streams throughout the year. However, they are never more important than in cold weather conditions and are often the only hatch to be found during the longest season of the trout states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming.

Because of a craving for dry fly fishing after a long absence, I watch for conditions that promote surface availability of the tiny insects. Air temperatures that exceed the freezing point by 6 to 8 degrees will usually stimulate late winter and early spring emergence, and overcast skies are often a positive factor in tempting wary trout to the surface. Temperatures below 50ᵒ seem to hold the adults on the surface, and this increases the potential for finding rising trout.

Trout feed more efficiently in slower currents when floating midges are the target, but gently riffled water should not be ignored. Seeing the miniature dry flies is completely dependent upon fishing as close to a surface feeder as possible, regardless of the water type. A cast beyond 30 feet will likely put a size 22 out of view, at which time you will be required to set the hook when a rise appears in the area where you think the fly is located.

By necessity, midge patterns must be of relatively simple design, as is the case with all exceptionally small imitations. Because of its unique flotational properties, CDC works well for midge patterns that must be supported on the surface with a minimal amount of material. My favorite floating patterns also incorporate a sparse application of hackle, and stripped goose biots are a regular feature as well.

While my midge box contains an extensive assortment of patterns representing all phases of the life cycle, three distinct floating imitations have demonstrated reliable productivity on waters as distant as Japan. And I fear little shame in admitting that their favored status is also based on the relative ease in which they can be seen on the water.

CDC Biot Midge Adult 

CDC Biot Midge Adult The First Rise By Rene’ Harrop

CDC Biot Midge Adult – Bonnie Harrop Photos

This pattern rides fairly high on the water and parallel to the surface in a manner that represents a fully emerged midge adult.

Hook: TMC 100 BL size 18-24
Thread: Gray 8/0
Abdomen: Canada Goose Biot or Stripped Peacock Herl
Wing: Sparse Lt. Dun CDC
Thorax: Gray Dubbing
Hackle: 1-3 turns of Grizzly

 CDC Hanging Midge

CDC Hanging Midge The First Rise By Rene’ Harrop

CDC Hanging Midge – Bonnie Harrop Photos

This easy to see midge pattern rides partially submerged with only the wing and hackle showing above the surface.

Hook: TMC 100 BL size 18-24
Thread: Gray 8/0
Body: Canada Goose Biot or Peacock Herl
Thorax: Gray Dubbing
Wing: White CDC
Hackle:  1-3 turns of Grizzly

CDC Cluster Midge

CDC Cluster Midge The First Rise By Rene’ Harrop

CDC Cluster Midge – Bonnie Harrop Photos

In a way, this pattern allows a bit of cheating on the usually very small midge patterns by imitating a cluster of mating insects that often swarm together on the surface.

Hook: TMC 100 BL size 14-20
Thread: Gray 8/0
Body: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Grizzly palmered
Wing: Sparse White CDC

A Double Taper Fly Line

Fall Streamers A Double Taper Fly Line

Fall Streamers

These days, it is the rare individual who does not bring a lasting ambition to cast a long line when he first picks up a fly rod. As a tool designed specifically for this purpose, a weight forward line is generally the first choice of a beginner, and many will never try anything different.

Like anyone else, I appreciate the ease in which a weight forward taper can be applied in situations where a long, straight line cast is the foremost objective. This especially applies to still water fishing where a floating line is not subject to the same factors found on moving water.

With a lifelong fondness for fishing dry flies on the predominantly larger rivers of the Rocky Mountain west, my preference lies in a much different line configuration when compared to the popular weight forward taper.

On moving water, inducing a natural presentation of an artificial is often almost equally dependent upon casting and mending. With maximum control both in the air and on the water as requirements more important than easily attained distance, my choice is a double taper floating line.

Even on big waters, I try to wade within 30 feet of a feeding trout. At this range and anything less, the performance of a weight forward and double taper line are essentially equal. It is beyond this distance that I begin to struggle with line control when fishing a weight forward taper.

Aerial Mend A Double Taper Fly Line

Aerial Mend

Unlike a weight forward, there is no hinge point with a double taper because the weight of the line is distributed throughout its length rather than being concentrated in the first 30 feet.  With consistent flex and contact with the rod tip, a double taper permits superior line control while also making it easier to regulate the velocity of fly delivery. And while there are exceptions, shooting slack line into the cast is not something I generally apply when presenting a dry fly. Additionally, I find it difficult if not impossible to make certain casts that rely on controlled line speed or consistent response to the rod tip when fishing a weight forward beyond 30 feet. Curve casting, aerial mending, and a long reach cast are much more easily accomplished with a double taper.

Reach Cast Left A Double Taper Fly Line

Reach Cast Left

Precise mending techniques are vital to managing the drift once the fly is on the water. With the thinner running line in the guides, it is virtually impossible to reposition the heavier front portion of a weight forward taper as a means of overcoming problematic currents that can disrupt a natural drift by causing the fly to drag.

Refined nymphing methods involving submerged flies in moving water can require precise casting and deft mending techniques that are quite similar to fishing a floating imitation. Whether maintaining a natural drift or inducing controlled action to the fly, it is not unusual to experience some difficulty when fishing beyond 30 feet with a weight forward line. For the same reasons that apply to dry fly fishing, I generally prefer a double taper when presenting a subsurface pattern to a big, nymphing trout in moving water.

Upstream Mend A Double Taper Fly Line

Upstream Mend

In keeping with the example of old time steel-headers prior to the popularity of two handed fly casting, I rely on a double taper floating line for spring and fall streamer fishing for trout when the water is low and often quite cold.

Swimming the fly mostly with the current or on a slow, pulsating swing often involves long, looping mends that may require some serious roll casting to execute correctly. And while a long cast on big water may require significantly more effort, I find 60-70 feet to be a reasonable distance for a 6 or 7 wt. double taper. Again, as in other situations discussed herein, I value line control above ease in gaining distance for low water streamer fishing where presenting the fly means considerably more than simply stripping it quickly through the water.

I have many highly accomplished friends and acquaintances who will stick with a weight forward line for virtually all of their trout fishing, and many will disagree with my comments and personal opinion regarding a double taper. This I accept without argument because fly tackle performance is an entirely individual matter, and I would never try to convince anyone that my way is best.

In general, I believe a double taper to be a specialized line best suited for refined presentation of dry flies on moving water.  But failing to understand its versatility is a common oversight by many who might benefit by simply giving it a try.            

Curve Cast A Double Taper Fly Line

Curve Cast

Genetically Modified Fish!

giant.radioactive.fukushima.squid .3 Genetically Modified Fish!

Giant radioactive fukushima squid

For the second time in just a few months, another giant sea creature has been found on the coast of California. This time a Giant squid measuring over 150 feet from head to tip of the tentacle has been washed ashore on the beach of the west-coast of the United States.

Judging by reports, experts in ‘radioactive gigantism’ believe these enlarged animals are coming from the waters near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in the Futaba District of Japan. Just three years ago the Nuclear Power Plant suffered badly from the Tsunami triggered by the  Tōhoku earthquake back in 2011. The plant released an estimated 10-30% of radioactive material of that recorded at the Chernobyl disaster 1986 – the second (first – Chernobyl) to be recorded a level 7 on the International Nuclear Event Scale. An unknown number of sea creatures suffered genetic mutations that triggered uncontrolled growth – or “radioactive gigantism” due to the incident.

The problem is, say officials in Santa Monica, CA, “These giant sea creatures seem to be drifting towards the US from Japan” They intend to remove the beast in pieces to Scripps Research Institute so they can study it in detail.

This may well be a hoax, but could you imagine a 30ft long eel swimming up your local river, or maybe a giant mackerel following your 20lb cod hooked on your favourite fishing tackle from the bottom of the ocean? This is the possibility of radioactive gigantism!

More genetically modified fish:

Oarfish have been reported to grow up to 15 meters in length, but the longest recorded and verified is 9 meters long. Rare fish such as these are almost impossible to catch as they can dive up to more than 3,000 feet (914 meters) in depth.

Giant Koi Carp Genetically Modified Fish!

Giant-Koi-Carp

Could you imagine hooking into something like this on your carp fishing rod? A giant Goldfish? After a ten minute battle, this thirty pound goldie was returned to fight another day. But with the lack of corroborating evidence, there have been many claims that the photo is nothing more than a clever hoax.

blinkydead 525x387 Genetically Modified Fish!

Blink Simpsons

Another classic case of fish mutation would be Blinky the Three-Eyed Fish (or Blinky) – a three-eyed orange fish species, found in the ponds and lakes outside Springfield Nuclear Power Plant. The Nuclear Power Plant caused the mutations.

All the above look real enough, there is some suspicion to them all, but who are we to cast judgement. What do you think?

 

 

Tackle Fishing with Good Fishing Tackle

It is almost a year since I started my position with Fishtec, a year in which my knowledge of the fishing tackle market has improved way beyond my expectations. Naturally, my heart belongs to the gear designed and manufactured by TF Gear: it’s great stuff, and it’s priced competitively enough for most anglers to enjoy. I can report our directors’ commitment to great design, good service and total dedication to ‘getting it right’. It can take many months of negotiation and, sometimes, a great deal of frustration before a particular item is deemed good enough to ‘go live’. Such was the case with the tremendously successful TF Gear Juggernaut Barrow. The carpets in our office were pretty worn out when I arrived on the scene in December of last year but endless ‘trial’ runs of the Juggernaut put a noticeable furrow in the canvas backing, I’d swear. But all the brain-ache was worth it: the TF Gear Juggernaut now trundles around countless lakes here and abroad, transporting heaps of tackle to distant swims with minimal effort and fuss. Why nobody thought before of a 3-wheeled barrow I’ll never know, but TF Gear got there first and are now at No.1 in the barrow-selling market.

DL Speed Runner Reel Tackle Fishing with Good Fishing Tackle

Look too at the TF Gear Speed-Runner fixed spool reel. It’s a feature-packed, high quality piece of angling wizardry that satisfies the demands of many a renowned angler, including Dave Lane who never goes fishing without them. With smooth, reliable, precision-engineered gears; a strong, well-balanced, high-grade alloy body; micro-adjustable drag and ten (that’s 10) ball-bearings to boost its performance, anyone would reasonably expect to pay twice the current price of £49.99! And here’s the thing: despite their astonishingly low price tag, they perform and look and ARE good enough to grace the classiest rods.

And let’s hear it for the TF Gear Poncho! I suspect I was like many anglers in viewing a Mexican-inspired ‘cover-all’ as a bit naff, but I bought one: at less than ten quid I thought it worth a gamble. First time out with the Poncho it absolutely hassed down but by gathering my gear around and under my low chair and covering the back-rest I rendered myself and my tackle utterly waterproof. Sitting in the thundering rain could hardly be called fun but I experienced a great deal of satisfaction from thwarting the worst Nature could throw at me. When the rain stopped I stood and uncovered my possessions in so doing, and in the midst of a steaming, dripping water-world I found myself and my gear to be bone dry! How’s that for a good tenner’s worth! I now keep a TF Gear Poncho in the car as well and intend buying half a dozen more for friends and family at Christmas.

Under our website-heading ‘Fishing Hats and Caps’ you’ll see the ‘TF Gear Fleece Hat, Gloves and Neck-Warmer Set’. It costs £19.99. I ask you to look at what this very modest sum buys, then to imagine how these items will keep you warm during those rock-solid days of deep mid-winter. The neck-warmer really appeals to me: it does everything a scarf can do but without superfluous, flailing tail-ends getting in the way; you simply pop it over your head and adjust the draw-cord for instant warmth and draft-proofing – things just keep getting better! Here’s further proof, and also evidence of our (necessarily!) unbiased nature at Fishtec Towers…

Avid Super low Chiar Tackle Fishing with Good Fishing Tackle

The Avid Super-Low Chair: at just 2.8kgs and supplied in a good quality canvas bag, you can sling this little beauty over your shoulder and set off for a full day’s roving and stalking. Thanks to Avid, being ‘mobile’ no longer means standing all day or sitting on the ground; now you can be comfortable in every little gap you come across – and very inconspicuous. The Avid Super-Low Chair is extremely well made and ingeniously designed; it folds lengthways and features rounded EVA arms that truly enhance your comfort. It takes up very little room and can be easily stored in a small cupboard, in the boot or at the back of the bivvy for guests.

So, the Avid Super-Low is just the job for the rover and the guest, but for the longer-stay angler who needs sustained comfort in a full-size chair there is simply no need to look further than the TF Gear ‘Dave Lane’ range and the Dave Lane Hardcore Armchair in particular. Just looking at the picture on the website brings about a sense of comfort and well-being so just think of how good it actually is to relax in; it might well have been designed by a top osteopath for his much-loved mother…sheer luxury! Truth is, you could ditch the armchairs in your living room in favour of a set of TF Gear Hardcore Armchairs and continue to enjoy a perfectly acceptable standard of living (A much better one in some cases!) I mean…how many G-Plan, Ercol or Parker-Knoll armchairs have adjustable legs and mud-feet back and front? None, I’d wager. Which of them allows you to recline parallel to the floor? And can you simply fold up a glazed-chintz Sanderson fireside chair and sling it single-handedly into the back of your van? You see the advantages of the TF Gear way, don’t you? Allow your mind to race a little…imagine your WHOLE HOUSE furnished with a full range of TF Gear fishing tackle? You could literally fold-up your living-room and bedrooms and have the lot stowed in the pantechnicon in less than three minutes. All of those black plastic bags filled to bursting with duvets and bed-clothes could be replaced by a few nicely compacted TF Gear sleeping bags in their stuff-sacks. At a stroke, moving house would be relegated to about 19th place in the list of life’s most stressful events.

God, I love working here….