Category Archives: Sea Fishing

There’s nothing better than launching a 4/5oz lead from the shore or dropping a Jelly worm over a wreck with with nothing but the nod of the fishing rod to tell you what’s happening below . Sea fishing can be exciting at the worst of times, TF Gear consultant Alan Yates describes the best way to catch saltwater species around the UK.

5 Surprising items every fisherman should own

Are you an avid sea angler? For true devotees of the noble art of sea fishing, investing in a wide range of sea fishing tackle is just the start.

It’s also important to own things that connect you to the ocean and the sport you love. We’re talking nautical knick-knacks.

Not only do they perform a useful function, they also look good about house and they’re a talking point, helping to cement your reputation as a true salt. Here are our top five things every sea fisherman should have.

1. Seaweed

Seaweed 525x297 5 Surprising items every fisherman should own

Image source: lovleah
Keep your eyes peeled for an attractive clump next time you’re out!

If you have a veranda, balcony or porch, you need kelp, a string of seaweed to dangle from a conveniently positioned hook. When you pop out to give it a stroke each morning, your neighbours might give you a funny look, but what do you care? You’re a sea angler.

But aside from it’s obvious connection to the sea, seaweed is an effective – albeit alternative – weather forecaster. The salt in the seaweed attracts the moisture in the air. Damp weed indicates a higher likelihood of rain, a dry brittle feel is a sure sign of dry, sunny, anti-cyclonic conditions. You could of course check the weather forecast – but where’s the fun in that? A true sea fishing fan needs to sniff the air and caress the kelp for himself.

2. Sextant

Sexant 525x324 5 Surprising items every fisherman should own

Image source: scorpp
Cool, quirky and actually useful.

It’s made of brass, it looks awesome, and if you really know how to use it, you’re so salty you make Ahab look like a landlubber. Strictly speaking, a land based sea angler has no need to possess a sextant. But if you do venture out to sea and lose sight of land, this instrument, along with your watch, is a nautical fall back you can’t afford to be without.

Before the advent of marine electronics and GPS, knowing how to use a sextant and chronometer to pinpoint your position on a chart was essential. A sextant is all too often treated as a quaint reminder of our nautical heritage. Until you lose your electrics.

3. Lunar calendar

Lunar Calendar 525x269 5 Surprising items every fisherman should own

Image source: ricardokuhl
Track the moon and land big.

When most people think of the lunar landings, they think in terms of “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” But as far as you’re concerned, it’s all about the fish. Most people know fish often feed at dawn and dusk, but you’ll increase your chances of making a catch if you also factor in moonrise and moonset.

And if you combine this new knowledge with fishing on the new or full moon, you’re really making out your chances of catching a specimen. So if you really want to know when it’s best to cast, add a lunar calendar to your shopping list!

4. Tide clock

Tide clock 525x303 5 Surprising items every fisherman should own

Image source: Bin im Garten
Do away with your tide book and invest in a clock.

No self respecting sea angler would allow him or herself to be caught on the hop when it comes to knowing what the tide’s doing. But if you live beyond sight of the brine, keeping an eye on the ebb and flow can be aided considerably by owning a tide clock.

Unlike a normal clock, the tide clock has only one hand which indicates high or low tide and the hours until the next tidal extreme. A tide clock’s efficacy at foretelling the time of the next tide varies according to where in the world you live, but in semi-diurnal tidal regions like most Atlantic coasts, it’s fairly efficient.

That said, because tides are brought about by the gravitational influences of the moon, sun and rotation of the earth, your clock will tend to gain by about 15 mins per month, so don’t forget to also invest in a tide timetable!

5. Barometer

Barometer 525x342 5 Surprising items every fisherman should own

Image source: Baloncici
Get your own mini weather station.

“Noi viviamo sommersi nel fondo d’un pelago d’aria,” said Evangelista Torricelli. And he was right – we do live at the bottom of an ocean of air. What the 17th century scientist realised was that “air ocean” currents create whirlpools and eddies which in turn give rise to areas of high and low atmospheric pressure.

In 1643, Torricelli took a 1 meter long glass test tube, filled it with mercury and stood it open end down in a trough filled with the same metal. The level of the mercury fell to 76cm, leaving a vacuum above. This level varied with changes in atmospheric pressure; it was the first barometer. These days, your barometer is more likely to be of the compact, air filled Aneroid variety. Either way, if you’re a proper angler, you need your own weather station. Go tap that glass.

What do you reckon – have we missed anything out? Let us know your must have items on Twitter and Facebook!

Fishing for Cod – Testing the new TF Gear Beachcaster

cod seven bridge Fishing for Cod   Testing the new TF Gear Beachcaster

Have you ever fished anywhere as wonderful as this? The Bristol channel, right along side the impressive Seven Bridge, reputable for it’s superb fishing, fast flowing, silty waters and in particularly it’s Cod Fishing.

Ceri Owen, one of our senior sea fishing customer service advisers took the new TF Gear Beachcaster rods out to test on his most recent trip to the shore, along with a TF Gear 65CTM casting reel and an handful of 8oz leads.

Looking to test these sea fishing rods to it’s maximum potential, the heavy weights cast into the heavy swell of the Bristol channel would certainly do that. Achieving maximum distance and great accuracy.

Ceri said the bite detection was superb, much better than any other Beachcaster he’s used yet it has the backbone to cast heavy leads and set them in to the San/Mud bank easily.

TF Gear Force 8 6 series CTM was loaded with 20lb TF Gear Red Mist and a TF Gear Aftershock Tapered Leader. Casting was totally smooth and reached 100+ Yards with next to no effort.

Fishing the channel is never easy, and Ceri had only planned a short trip but landed plenty of Cod on Black Lug fished on a Pennell rigs.

ceri cod Fishing for Cod   Testing the new TF Gear Beachcaster

2015 CLA Game Fair Update

IMG 0100 525x295 2015 CLA Game Fair Update

KAYAKS AT THE GAME FAIR

I’ve just come from a planning meeting for this year’s CLA Game Fair and one of the most exciting developments for many years is in the pipeline:

They’re creating a complete ‘Kayak Experience’ within the fishing village. Game Fair visitors can come and see the very latest kayaks and fishing equipment, but beyond that they will also be able to try them out on the lake! Wetsuits will be provided with full changing room facilities and experts will be on hand to help! offer advice and look after safety. Leisure, sport and surf kayaks will be involved, as well as kayaks specifically designed for fishing.

This looks to be a golden opportunity to sample this exciting and growing branch of game fishing so put the dates in your diary: Harewood House near Leeds, 31st July to 2nd August 2015. Save money and buy tickets now at www.cla.org.uk

Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary Late December 2014

Mick Tapsell ray 4.220kg Ad pier Dover Xmas 14 Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary Late December 2014

The lengthy spell of mild weather continues into the New Year and lots of shore anglers are going to be shocked when the weather finally breaks and the heavy frosts and snow arrives. Then most of the quality fish move away to deep water. In recent years the autumn season seems to have extended, but when winter comes it does so with a vengeance and we are just about to experience that happening. Currently it’s remarkable that from many parts of the country the rays are still around. I fished a Christmas match at Dover recently and the Admiralty pier which has been closed for months was reopened especially for competitors in the Dover Sea Angling Christmas match – A great gesture by Dover Harbour Board and it suggests the pier will reopen to the public soon. However, that match produced a cracking thornback ray of 4.222kg for local angler, Mick Tapsell, it was amongst three which is rare for the pier, let alone in December. Then my old mate Chris Clark lands a giant undulate in Dorset whilst fishing for a Sea Angler magazine feature, whilst around the rest of the country the rays are still turning up. The question is, are they changing to an all round year fish rather than just a summer species? Of course the answer is that they have always been around all year, but numbers were so small we never noticed. Now the rays, like the dogfish, have expanded their population and are inshore in late winter and early spring with populations overlapping – they are indeed an all year around sea species. Look out for the Hants and Dorset small eyed rays turning up in March with the Kent thornbacks kicking off in February, that is if they don’t show all winter.

Currently the codling are inshore in good numbers and they should stay until spring because they cannot spawn yet. If they could they would be off into deep water in most regions around February to spawn. This first two months of the New Year are annually a time for tiddlers, because all the larger specimens depart our shores to spawn. This year the codling will stay and that will make shore fishing on lots of venues worthwhile in the New Year and right up to spring. That will make a great change from dabs and the dreaded rockling, which for some anglers are the only February species around. The question about the cod that remains is, will enough survive to return next winter when they will be five and six pounds? The last time we had such a flush of codling it was in the glory years of the sixties and the 2lb fish of 1963 fuelled the cod bonanza that the older generation remembers. Could this happen again? Well if the commercials allow it. With Brussels having just upped the cod quota for the North sea I fear for the worst – It would be a tragedy if come next October no cod turned up, but with the French trawlers combing the upper English Channel and the cheating commercial fishermen who get around the small mesh size by filling their trawls with string what chance have the fish got?

Neville Broad 5lkb cod Dungeness 525x333 Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary Late December 2014

Neville Broad of Sheerness with a 5lb cod from Dungeness, that’s the size the current crop of codling should return at next winter.

And then there is the question of bass – has no one noticed how few really big bass have been caught this year? Those large spawning fish have almost been completely rounded up and although we have plenty of schoolies around at present – I dread that may end soon. A lot of Angling Trust and Government hot air about bass stocks currently, but nothing is actually being done to protect stocks.

Tactics for the coming weeks include a supply of stickie lugworms, despite the codling around and they like freshout lugworms best, I just love catching and eating dabs which are at their plumpest at this time of year. Slightly off worms are a bait the dabs are always on the lookout for, because the worms are continuously buried dead and unearthed decaying by the storms and the lesser waves. Dabs can have tunnel vision for stickie worms on some winter days.

Before I go some positive news and that is that I fished my new Force Eight Continental beach casters in the rocks recently – Pulley Pennells and all and I landed three codling and a bass using 30lb all through. Not big fish, but what a pleasure to be able to fish light and you can read all about it in a future issue of sea angler magazine.

Tight lines and a Happy New Year,

Alan Yates

Rare Deep-Sea Greenland Shark


Sometimes watching footage of the seabed can be as exciting as watching paint dry, but when something like the mysterious Greenland shark appears where no-one has ever seen one before, people like Alan Turchik (National Geographic Mechanical Engineer) can get very, very excited indeed!

The camera which was placed 211 meters (700 feet) down on the seafloor and recorded over 3 hours of absolute nothingness, only to be briefly interrupted by a small jellyfish, but after staring at the sand for much of the time a Greenland shark bumped into the camera and lumbered through the frame! For a species which remains an enigma to scientists to the day, any new information such as sightings like this one – is invaluable.

Catching Turchik’s joyful reaction on camera expletive-filled reaction on film was pure luck. The cameraman Michael Pagenkopf wanted to take some shots of the team working on the boat for a film of the expedition, so he trained the lens on Turchik who was reviewing the video footage downloaded from the camera.

Just as Pagenkopf swapped his cameras battery and started filming, the picture on Turchik’s screen started bouncing around – It didn’t take long to hear how he felt about the sharks presence.

greenland Rare Deep Sea Greenland Shark

A Deep-Sea Enigma

These sharks are a conundrum, says Greg Skomal, a senior marine fisheries scientist at Massachusetts Marine Fisheries who wasn’t involved in the survey. Scientists aren’t sure how long the sharks live—a hundred years is one estimate—how big they get, or even if they’re predators or scavengers.

Based on the sharks’ stomach contents, “they seem to be chowing down on cod, wolffish, squid, and a variety of marine mammals,” says Peter Bushnell, a fisheries biologist at Indiana University South Bend. They may also be taking bites out of beluga whales.

 They can be as big as great white sharks, but that’s about as far as the comparison goes, growing to an estimated  7.3 meters (24 feet) long. With a maximum speed of just 1.7 mph and being mostly blind one would think they’re happy to eat rotting carcasses.

However, if the history of fishing is any guide, Greenland sharks are common as muck. The sharks were fished from the early 20th century until the 1960s; mainly for their liver oil, which was used as lamp fuel and industrial lubricant. In some years, over 30,000 were taken. That suggests a very healthy population.

In line with that, a recent expedition used 120 hooks on a longline, (not your normal sea fishing equipment!) and caught 59 sharks. “I think they’re fairly common,” says Aaron Fisk of the University of Windsor in Ontario. “When we want to catch them we don’t have any trouble.”

 

 

Quiz! What kind of fisherman are you?

Are you a hunter, a lounger, a competitor perhaps?

There are as many types of angler as there are anglers, from those who take their sea fishing tackle very seriously, to those who are more concerned with a snooze by the river.

And we thought, since it’s Christmas, why not have a little fun? Here we give you the chance to find out just what kind of fishing enthusiast you are!

bigstock Young man fishing on a lake fr 49801037 Quiz! What kind of fisherman are you?

What’s your ideal Christmas gift?

When you get to your favorite fishing spot, what’s the first thing you do?

When you catch a fish do you:

When fishing in company do you:

Later, you’re at the pub with friends do you:


Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary December 2014

mix of baits 525x349 Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary December 2014

That disgruntled look on the tackle dealer’s face when you ask him if he has any bait tells a story – Those first heavy frosts, the torrential rain and the failing daylight all conspire to make lugworm more valuable than gold at this time of year, well the way prices are rocketing they soon will be. (£5 for ten blacks) What makes things worse is that anglers in generally are just not appreciative enough of how difficult it is to dig or pumps worms and I always suggest those that whinge and moan should try digging their own worms before they complain. Especially when it comes to the size of the worm – the diggers just cannot get giant worms all the time.

The simple fact is that the diggers and pumpers cannot get enough worms to make their efforts worthwhile, especially during the neap tides. That’s why the late summer and autumn army of part time, beer money diggers and pumpers vanish in December – they just cannot collect enough bait per tide. So it’s left to a hardy bunch of pros that dig in any weather to supply an increasing demands. This season is going to be exceptionally difficult because there is a glut of small codling that’s fuelling a bigger demand for lugworm.

So what is the solution? Well for the majority its, talk nicely to the tackle dealer time and hope he can help you out. Or more reliance of the stock of frozen worms and squid you have in the freezer. You don’t have any frozen bait? Well sorry but you should have seen the shortage coming and prepared. It’s a pain having the best tackle on the planet and no bait to fish with, but there IS always a way to raise something to put on your hook and a visit to the largest supermarket in your region that has a fish counter is called for. Desperate to fish, there are fresh farmed mussels which make a great bait tied on the hook with elastic cotton. The fresh frozen tropical prawns also catch, again tied on the hook with cotton. As for squid it’s usually available and if you can’t get Calamari try the larger English type squid or cuttlefish fresh or frozen. In some fishmongers and in some regions direct from the boats, etc you may find fresh herrings, sprats and even a mackerel so all is not lost.

If you can get lugworm, any kind of lugworm – then appreciate it. Although many don’t and be-moan the smaller common or blow lugworm. Indeed it seems everyone has become brain washed into thinking that only blacks or yellow tails catch cod and that the smaller, softer common lugworm is useless as bait – Well let me say that in the past small common lugworm have caught lots of cod and a hook full of small worms can out fish one giant worm because one it gets washed out all scent has gone. Six worms on a hook and the juices last longer. Any lugworm is better than no lugworm!

Razorfish e1418402128898 Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary December 2014
As for frozen black lugworm, it’s soft and sloppy and goes in the hook like mash potatoes, but add some light bait elastic and you can make it compact and attractive – so much so that lots of anglers fish all winter with little else.

The last bait source I can recommend is the low tide beach on some regions after a storm – Enough shell fish like cockle, razor fish, clams, queenies etc can be washed up in a single tide to keep you in bait all winter. You do have to watch the wind and tide for the perfect storm and be prepared to travel at an instant, but when it occurs you will have enough bait for the freezer for the rest of the winter. I prefer to freeze shellfish as it comes, again tying it on the hook with elastic cotton, but some recommended blanching shellfish which allows it to stay tougher when frozen.

My final piece of advice if its cod you are after which requires very little bait is to adopt a tactic that is becoming increasingly popular for cod around the UK and that’s live baiting. In lots of regions, especially in the South and East, there are so many small whiting present that any bait is devoured in minutes. So anglers have solved the problem of the pest whiting by fishing a double hook rig or a Pennell rig with a small worm or fish hook baited for the whiting so that when it gets hooked it stays on the rig until a bigger predator comes along and that gets hooked by the bigger hook. There are still bass around and with the bigger cod moving inshore this month it’s the method to use!

drew Cass 11 lb 12½ oz WG e1418402110443 Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary December 2014

Whitby sea angler, Andrew Cass landed this beauty of 11 lb 12½ oz on a big cocktaill bait during a four hour night club match.

You can of course fish with bait if you have plenty, but make sure it’s a giant mouthful the whiting cannot devour with a cocktail of worm, crab, shellfish and squid in various large combinations!

Tight lines,

Alan Yates

Warming winter fish dishes

There’s nothing more comforting on a winters day than cooking and eating your catch.

While fishing is a great hobby and pastime, it is also a great way to enjoy fresh seafood without the supermarket price tag. While delicious served barbecued with a cold salad dish in the summer, fish is also a fantastic winter warming ingredient.

With this in mind, here are our top 3 winter fish recipes. Simply grab your sea fishing gear, land a catch and get cooking.

Dover sole with caper butter sauce

Dover Sole1 Warming winter fish dishes

Image source: Ewan Munro
Fine dine at home with sole and caper infused butter.

Ingredients
2 whole Dover sole, skinned
Olive oil, for greasing
Salt and pepper to taste

Caper butter sauce
Juice 2 lemons
50g (2oz) butter
4tbsp capers, drained and rinsed
2tbsp parsley, finely chopped
2 tbsp dill, roughly chopped
1 shallot, roughly chopped

Method: The fish

1.       Heat the grill to medium-high. Season the fish to your liking and then gently massive each fish with olive oil to grease.
2.       Place the each fish on to a well-oiled baking tray.
3.       Grill for 10-15 minutes without turning until the fish are cooked and beginning to flake

Method: The caper butter

1.       To make the caper butter, place all the ingredients except the capers and the parsley into a food processor and blitz to a smooth paste.
2.       Remove from the food processor into a bowl and add the capers and parsley. Mix well.
3.       Spoon the mixture onto a piece of cling film and form into a roll. Twist both ends of the cling film.
4.       Place in the fridge until ready to use

Method: To finish

1.    Remove the butter from the fridge, remove the cling film and slice the butter roll in to 0.5cm slices
2.    To serve, place the fish onto a serving plate and top with several slices of the caper butter. Place under a hot grill to melt the butter

Family-friendly fish pie

Fish Pie Warming winter fish dishes

Image source: Atelier Joly
A tasty fish pie is sure to be a hit with your kids.

Ingredients
500g white fish (e.g. coley, pollock)
125g raw peeled king prawns
600ml milk
6 to 8 large potatoes
pinch salt
50g butter
1 1/2 tablespoons plain flour
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
100g grated cheese
1 carrot
2 sticks celery
2 small red chillies
1 lemon

Method

1. Preheat oven to 200 C / Fan 180 C / Gas mark 5. Place the fish in an oven-proof dish and cover with the milk. Bake in the oven uncovered for 30 minutes or until the fish is cooked through.
2. Peel and chop the potatoes, and boil with a pinch of salt until soft.
3. When the fish is done drain the milk into a jug and put aside. Flake the fish with a fork and leave in the dish.
4. Once potatoes are done, drain, then add 30g of the butter and a splash of the reserved milk and mash.
5. In another saucepan melt the remaining 20g of butter on a medium heat and slowly add the flour stirring constantly until you get a smooth paste.
6. Add the remaining milk, stirring constantly, until you get a sauce-like consistency.
7. Add the parsley and stir well. Cook for 5 minutes, constantly stirring.
8. Add the sauce to the flaked fish and prawns and mix well. Also grate the carrot and celery and chop the chillies and add.
9. Squeeze in the juice of the lemon.
10. Top with the mashed potato and spread evenly. Sprinkle the grated cheese evenly over the potato topping.
11. Place back in the oven for 30-40 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbling and slightly golden brown.
12. Take out of the oven and leave to cool for 5 to 10 minutes.

Super scrummy sea mackerel sandwich

Mackerel Sandwich Warming winter fish dishes

Image source: cyclonebill
Opt for mackerel on rye bread for a Scandinavian twist.

Ingredients
4 large mackerel fillets, boned
Flour for dusting
1 egg, beaten
40-50g fresh white breadcrumbs
1 small loaf of good-quality bread
Vegetable or corn oil for frying
100g light Philadelphia cream cheese
1 tablespoon creamed horseradish
1 red onion
1 lemon
1 punnet of cress

Method: the fish
1.       Prepare three separate bowls, one containing the flour seasoned with salt and pepper, another with the egg and the final with the breadcrumbs
2.       Lightly coat the mackerel fillets in the flour, shaking off any excess, then pass through the egg and then the breadcrumbs.
3.       Heat the oil in a frying pan and cook the mackerel fillets for a couple of minutes on each side until crisp and golden; remove and drain on some kitchen paper.

Method: the sauce
1.       Finely grate the zest of one of your lemons, then cut it in half.
2.       Put the cream cheese into a large bowl with the creamed horseradish and add the lemon zest.
3.       Finely chop the red onion and mix in with the cream cheese and horseradish mixture
4.       Season with salt and pepper to taste

Method: to finish
1.       Spread the horseradish and cream cheese sauce on to the bread
2.       Gently place two of fried the mackerel fillet per sandwich
3.       Sprinkle with cress and serve

Whether a light afternoon snack in the form of a sandwich, or a delicious winter filler pie for the whole family, these recipes ensure that your love of fishing goes beyond just the catch. Using the fish you catch is a great way to save valuable cash as well as producing a greatly satisfying meal sourced from the sea, straight to the table.

Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

deeper54 525x269 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

The Deeper Fish Finder is a first of its kind in the world of wireless fishfinders, that work in conjunction with your Android or iOS device. Once connected Information from the floating Deeper is transmitted Via wireless Bluetooth technology negating the need for a cabled connection. Because of it’s light and compact design, it is suitable for use on a variety of vessels, platforms or fishing grounds.

With the Deeper Smart Fishfinder which is now available from Fishtec, you’ll only ever need one device to locate any possibly feeding fish. It’s completely portable, so you can fish places other fish finder’s can’t reach. From the shore, dock, kayak or boat. This unique wireless technology will help you gather intelligence anywhere you go. Once you attach the Deeper to your line, you will have instant information about fish, structure, depth and even water temperature – anywhere you cast.

deeper3 e1416396382447 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

The wireless sonar technology works in conjunction with Android and iOS tablets and Mobile Phones. No more wires! No more external batteries! No more frustrating weight!

Deeper, is a smart sonar for smartphones and tablets supporting Android 2.3+ and iOS 5.0+ operating systems. The smart sonar works in the depths from 0.5m to 40m (130 feet) and will transmit back to your device up to 50m away. The Deeper Wireless FishFinder uses a Bluetooth connection to show the information about the fish, the pond bed, water temperature and any obstacles you may bump into, all on the screen of a smartphone or a tablet.

A dual beam transmitted from the Deeper to the river or lake bed combines great detail and a wide coverage area, allowing you to gather as much data as possible about your fishing location.

What you get inside the box

Deeper Smart Fishfinder comes in a unique high quality material retail package. Smart angler kit includes: Deeper Smart Fishfinder – wall adapter – car charger – usb wire – mini pouch – attachment bolts – user manual. * Smartphone or tablet is not included.

deeper1 525x314 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Compatibility

The world’s most versatile sonar – Deeper Smart Fishfinder works with devices you already own, including Android tablets and smartphones, iPhones and iPads, however, not all mobile devices compatible.Made for: iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5, iPhone 4s, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS and iPad Air, iPad (4th generation), iPad mini, iPad (3rd generation), iPad 2,iPad. Requires latest iOs version. Android smartphones – OS version 2.3 and later, screen size: mdpi-normal, hdpi-normal, xhdpi-normal. Android tablets -OS version 3.0 and later, screen size: mdpi-xlarge.

Deeper Smart Fishfinder application is compatible with more than 2500 different smartphone and tablet devices.

The Deeper App provides you with a detailed fishing calendar, integrated camera function, up-to-date weather reports, customized fishing log, integrated map function, and is fully integrated within social media networks Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. You can choose from different system of units, frequencies or languages. Sound alarms notifies about fish location, size or water depth. Import and export function allows to use multiple devices and to keep the data on the cloud services. This app is the perfect planning tool for outdoor activities. If you could not brag about great catches until today, with Deeper app you will always bring fish home.

  • Sonar function + 15 min data history log
  • Fish activity calendar
  • Camera
  • 5 days weather forecast
  • Used in Salt and Fresh water.
  • Fishing log
  • Online maps
  • Sharing via Facebook, Twitter, G+
  • Data backup on cloud

Available Accessoriesdeeper cover2 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

The Deeper FishFinder also features changeable skins (or covers) which allow you to change the colour of your Deeper to ensure you can see it at all times. At night, simply select ‘night fishing mode’ from the App on your device, and the Deeper will illuminate Deeper Coloured Covers/Skins, allowing you to see your Deeper wherever you’re fishing.

Available in four different eye catching colours for varied lights. deeper cover1 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Also available for the Deeper FishFinders is an additional Flexi Arm, the innovatively designed Mount Clamp grips various shapes and super slim objects (from 0.5cm; 0.2″). Quick release clamp makes it easy to move the mount between different places. A universal ¼ 20in (quarter twenty) male screw is compatible with RAM Mounts and most paddle sport track.

deeper flexi 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Your Deeper Fishfinder can be attached directly to any kind of boats, kayaks, canoes, float tubes or radio controlled floating devices with the Deeper Flexible Arm.

deeper flexi2 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary November 2014

The first big cod of the winter for the boats in the south east was from the Varne Boat Clubs cod open. Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary November 2014

Varne boat club angler with the first big cod of the season for the Kent dinghy group.

With codling showing all around the UK at present it looks as if we are in for a reasonable winter, although the question is will the fish survive the nets for next year when they will be considerably bigger, in fact big enough to greatly improve the quality of the UK shore fishing? That is yet to be seen, although even the most cynical will expect a few to survive to make the 6lb mark and they can really pull the string.

Back to the present and my return from a week in Portugal was greeted with the first frost of the winter, I drove back from Gatwick airport amongst the gritters and the reality of winter has arrived. For me it’s time to loose the summer garments and break out the winter sea fishing tackle including hoodies, thermals and swap the brolly for the full Hurricane shelter. Time also for those 8oz leads to go back in the tackle box for a spot of low punchy casting into the teeth of the gale – they do tow the bait well and make a great difference on the stormy beaches.

I have also given the bait pump an overhaul with new washers which always give it some extra suction and a soak in fairy Liquid makes them even better. I am a bit concerned I will not be able to hack it with my bad shoulder, but the simple fact is lugworms will be difficult to come by in the tackle shop and pumping your on is the only option. I have laid down a supply of frozen blacks in the freezer and they do work well, especially after Christmas when the dabs arrive and the constant storms means the fish are accustomed to finding dead smelly marine life unearthed by the slightest swell. In the meantime nothing beats a fresh out, juicy, black or yellowtail for those codling other than perhaps a peeler crab, although supplies of peelers too start to dwindle this month. Also watch out for those shellfish being washed up after an onshore wind – Cockles, butterfish, razor fish and the larger clams all make a hook bait, but do work best when they are being washed up. Here in Kent Dungeness can be littered with shells after a good blow and being just inside the Point at the right time you can fill a bucket. I particularly like those large red queen cockles which are great for codling, bass and dabs as well.

Another bait which comes into its own around Christmas is fresh sprat and herring, the whiting love it in strips or chunks, whilst here it’s renowned for the biggest dabs which are nicknamed “sprat dabs” because of their liking for sprat.

Reports suggest most regions of the country are reporting codling and it’s noticeable that

the bigger fish are in the estuary regions where there are lots of shrimps. The rough ground codling also seem to grow faster, whilst from the clean sandy beaches the millions of hungry whiting mean the codling are lean. Those whiting are a pest particularly after Christmas when the pin size fish invade the shoreline, but don’t dismiss fishing a live bait rig at this time because the bigger fish and a late bass are fond of those small whiting.

Looking into the New Year it’s a time when only the match anglers have fun in many regions. Once those bigger specimens of all species have left to spawn its tiddlers only, especially from the clean beaches. My advice is to head for the deeper water of the piers, rocks or the boats for the bigger fish.

Here are a few New Year shore competitions to look out for:

1st of January Holt SAC New Year Open at Kelling. Details from Mike 07858758669 / Peter 07769908480 /  holtseaanglers@gmail.com

3rd of January the Pembroke & District Angling Club. Air Ambulance Open at Amroth.

Fishing is 10:30pm until 2.30pm. £200 first prize for the heaviest bag flounders only. Reg Amroth Arms. Details: John 01437 563552

4th of January the Wyvern Open shore at Slapton Sands, South Devon.  Fishing is 1pm until 6pm. Tickets and details from Mike Spiller 01404 43397.

10th and 11th of January the Asso Two Day Open is being fished at Seabrook and Hythe in Kent. Fishing 12pm until 5pm. Pre book only. Limited to 120 Entries. Details: 07866 714497

11th January East Anglian League and open at Sizewell. Fishing 10 am until 3pm. Contact: Rob Tuck 07855 848967

25th of January the Amble Open. Fishing 9.30am until 2.30pm. Register on the day at the Radcliffe Club, Amble from 7am. Tickets local tackle shops. Entry fee £12 all classes. Contact Jimmy French on 01665 711007 or Tony Cook on 01665 602034.

25th January the Fords Sports and Social S.A.C 40th Open Beach Fishing Festival.

At Weston Shore, Southampton. Rolling Mill to Beach Lane Netley. Fishing 11am until 4pm. Entry Fee is £11, juniors £4. no pegging beach prior to signing in. Steve Eales 02380650519.

Finally, I am just back from a few days fishing in the Algarve, Portugal, my first holiday of 2014 and it was great to fish in the sunshine with the new Continental TF Gear beachcasters. Real light line fishing for some speedy gilthead bream. I was surprised by the

result and the trip lead to a feature in the New Year edition of Sea Angler magazine so look out for it.

The group of Portuguese plus mate Clive Richards I fished with on the Algarve. Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary November 2014

Tight lines,

Alan Yates