Fly Tying

Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henry’s Fork

Shayne Harrop Spring Caddis Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henrys Fork

Shayne Harrop Spring Caddis

In recent years I have sometimes struggled to separate the personal importance of fishing hatches larger than size 18 or leaving the season of gloves, heavy fleece, and covered ears. In most years, however, both comforts tend to arrive together around early May when conditions are right for streamside willows to come into bud and the first caddis of the year to begin their emergence.

Like nearly all willows and caddis, I find it difficult to tolerate long periods of below freezing temperatures, especially while in pursuit of rising trout.  And with the sharp vision of youth now only a memory, my eyes become instantly grateful when a size 14 dry fly can attract the kind of enthusiasm from trout that only the warm season can inspire. Learn how casting and perfectly presenting a dry fly will catch you more fish.

In the U.S., the second Sunday in May is a day of honor for mothers nationwide which, by itself, is of no small significance. In much of the northern Rockies, however, Mother’s Day coincides with the appearance of a sizeable, mostly brown caddis that begins a string of like insects that will stretch into early autumn. And while not always the dominant insect of choice, caddis in a variety of sizes and colors play a substantial role in the diet of trout throughout the most comfortable months of the year.

Like mayflies, caddis provide opportunity to fish weighted imitations in their subsurface form. Cased and free living larvae are prime attractions for trout in nearly any season. Pupae, the second stage, become available just prior to and during emergence and are fished differently than the deep, dead drift method that is appropriate for the larval stage.

MY favorite pupal imitation is a weighted Ascending Caddis that is fished either upstream with a lift or across and downstream with a twitching motion applied by the rod tip. With naturals being active and often quick in their rise to the surface, the take on a tight line can be sudden and forceful as the fish rushes to engulf the fly before it can escape the water.

During emergence, an aggressive rise that moves a lot of water indicates a trout taking rising caddis pupae close to the surface. Duplicating the appearance and behavior of the natural in this situation means fishing a submerged rather than floating pattern.

A floating pupae pattern like the CDC Bubble Back Caddis will imitate the brief but often distinct period between the transition from subsurface pupa to winged adult. Fished on the surface without drag or perhaps with a slight twitch, the Bubble Back Caddis creates an illusion of vulnerability if only for a few seconds. However, this slight window of enhanced opportunity can be enough to attract a trout’s attention.

Caddis in the winged stage are known to be more active on the water than mayflies. Following a traditional approach to dealing with this mobility, I utilize a pattern featuring a dubbed body with hackle palmered along its entire length. This, combined with a wing of paired CDC feathers, provides a light foot print on the water and allows the fly to be inched across the surface when such behavior is called for. Flotation of this style is excellent on most water but I will sometimes add a small amount of elk hair to bolster performance on extra rough currents.

Brogan Harrop Spring Caddis Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henrys Fork

Brogan Harrop Spring Caddis

The CDC Henry’s Fork Caddis was inspired by big, selective trout feeding in clear and slow moving water. Although this pattern floats quite low on the water it possesses excellent flotation and visibility when compared to most other slow water caddis patterns. I find the Henry’s Fork Caddis to be particularly effective on summer mornings and evenings when the temperatures are cooler and the naturals mostly sedate on the water.

Unlike some who tend to trivialize the value of caddis in comparison to well-known mayfly hatches, I carry a rather extensive selection of specialized caddis patterns. The following four patterns, however, comprise a sound foundation for addressing most of what will be encountered during a caddis emergence and their subsequent return to the water when eggs are deposited and the cycle ends

The following is a sampling of some of the most common colors.

Ascending Caddis Tan Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henrys Fork

Ascending Caddis
Hook: TMC 206 BL size 12-20
Thread: Tan 8/0
Rib: Copper Wire
Back: Brown Marabou
Abdomen:  Tan Dubbing
Legs:  Brown Partridge fibers
Antennae:   2 Wood Duck fibers

CDC Bubble Back Caddis Tan Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henrys Fork

CDC Bubble Back Caddis (Tan)

Bubble Back Caddis
Hook: TMC 206 BL size 12-20
Thread: Tan 8/0
Shuck: Sparse tuft of Tan dubbing over 3 Wood Duck fibers
Abdomen: Tan CDC feathers looped over Tan dubbing to create a humped effect.
Hackle: Brown Partridge
Thorax: Brown Dubbing

CDC Palmered Caddis Adult Brown Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henrys Fork

CDC Palmered Caddis Adult Brown

CDC Palmered Caddis Adult
Hook: TMC 100 BL size 12-20
Thread: Brown 8/0
Hackle: Whiting Cree or Grizzly dyed brown
Body: Brown Dubbing
Wings: Paired Brown CDC feathers
Antennae: 2 Wood Duck fibers

CDC Henrys Fork Caddis Olive Fishing the Caddis Hatch at Henrys Fork

CDC Henry’s Fork Caddis Olive

CDC Henry’s Fork Caddis
Hook: TMC 100 BL size 12-20
Thread: Olive 8/0
Abdomen: Olive Goose or Turkey Biot
Wing: Paired Med. Dun CDC feathers
Over Wing: Brown Partridge fibers
Thorax: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Whiting Grizzly dyed dun trimmed on bottom

Fly of the Week – Rhyacophila Caddis

fly of the week Fly of the Week   Rhyacophila CaddisThe Rhyacophila Caddis is found in almost all rivers around the UK. It’s a free-living caddis, meaning it doesn’t build a ‘house’. The Larvae like caddis favours shallow riffles and often gets caught in the current and drifts freely downstream, this making them ideal food for trout and grayling. The ‘Rhyacs’ hatch later in the afternoon and the adults can provide some great dry fly action when they return to the water. Tying a Rhyac caddis can be complicated, but here’s a simple little pattern we’ve been using for the grayling this winter.

Attach your favoured hook into the vice, here I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph hook. Run your thread along the body to the extreme bend in the hook. Wind a layer of lead into the shank of the hook to add some weight. A tungsten bead can be used but I like these on dropper so a lead underbody is usually enough weight. With your thread, make sure you taper the body to give a slim, streamline effect and ensure you cover the lead with the thread, once the dubbing gets wet, you will get a green glow from the underbody, if you forget to do this, the lead will dampen the colour of the body.

For the rib I’ve used the tag end of thread where I first tied onto the hook. Attach two sides to the fly, FlyBox bleach dyed peacock herl is a great material to imitate the legs. Dub a TIGHT rope of dubbing onto your thread ensuring you get a thin from and back end with a slightly thicker abdomen. In touching turns wind the dubbing towards the eye and pull the side legs along the length of the hook. Secure the body and legs in place with the rib with evenly spaced turns. Tie off and add some black pen to the head of the fly to imitate the Rhyacophila’s wing bud cover.

Fly Tying Materials

Hook: Fulling Mill Czech Nymph 12
Thread: Glo Bright No12
Underbody: Medium Lead Wire
Rib: Glo Bright No12
Body: Rhyac Green Dubbing
Sides: Bleach Dyed Peacock – Chart
Colour: Black Pen

Fly Tying Tips – How to tie in Peacock Herl

Even the best peacock herl strands are very brittle so constructing a fly with a tear and rip proof body is a tough task without bulking it up too much. In this weeks fly tying tip we’re going to show you how to securely tie in peacock herl and create a great looking peacock body that needs an atomic bomb to destroy.

This tip was shown to be in a fly tying class probably around 12 years ago and has been saving many of my flies from the death of trout teeth. One way to test how good this method of tying peacock herl is – is to use one fly using this technique and another without, you’ll be surprised how quickly the peacock will break.

They tutorial below is obviously just the peacock body, incorporating this method into flies such as diawl bachs, black and peacock spiders, or practically anything with a peacock body, you’ll strengthen the body tenfold.

Fly Tying Tips – How to Strip Peacock Herl

A lot of fly tiers, especially novices, have trouble stripping peacock herl. Some describe it as an art, to get all the tiny herls free from the stalk, ready to tie your favourite buzzers and nymphs with very realistic bodies. 

As a tier I get asked ‘How to strip peacock herl?’ fairly often – there are many different ways fly tiers have come up with, from using the blade of a scissors to an eraser. Personally I like the old fashion approach:

Fly of the Week – Hares Ear Grub

Fly of the week2 Fly of the Week   Hares Ear Grub

The Hares Ear is probably one of the most used flies within the fishing community, here’s we’ve tied a variant which lends itself perfectly to river fishing and ideal for targeting trout and especially grayling in the winter months. The heavy tungsten bead gives it added weight to get to the bottom quickly into the fishes feeding zone. Hares ears are very versatile patterns, try changing the colour of the thorax and bead, this will change the fly completely.

Start off by threading a tungsten bead onto your hook. Here I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph hook, it gives a great grubby look to any pattern and is also a great pupa hook. Secure the bead in place by butting up a few turns of lead and fully securing with thread wraps. Cover the lead body to ensure it doesn’t slip down the hook follow the hook shank down around three-quarters of the way around the bend.

Take a length of gold wire and tie in at the back of the hook. Take a decent pinch of Hares ear and create a tight, tapered dubbing rope which will reach the thorax of the fly. Wind in touching turns and secure in place with the gold wire rib. For the thorax I like to use a contrasting colour such as black, orange or yellow. Dub a small amount of dubbing to the thread and wind towards the bead, securing with a whip finish at the head.

Scruffy Hares ear for Grayling 

Hook: Fulling Mill Czech Nymph Size 10
Thread: Black UTC thread
Bead: Gold Tungsten bead 3mm
Underbody: Medium Lead Wire
Rib: Hares Ear
Thorax: Spectra Dub Glister
Varnish: Veniard Clear

Fly of the Week – Pink Glister Bug

Fly of the week1 Fly of the Week   Pink Glister Bug

Everyone who’s ever caught grayling, know that they absolutely love pink. It’s one of those colours that really stand out when anglers talk about what fly they caught on, if it’s a hotspot, or a fully blow pink grub, pink is usually in there somewhere. This glister bug has proven it’s worth in any grayling fishers fly box, this fly pattern has counted for numerous amounts of fish for myself and others I fish with. I wouldn’t be without it.

I tie this fly with many colour tungsten beads but silver has to be my favourite. Take a bead and thread it onto a hook. Here’s I’ve used a Fulling Mill Czech Nymph size 12. Runa layer of thread onto the shank of the hook, securing the bead in place and bulking up the thorax. Wind your thread onto the hook and cover the lead to ensure it’s securely in place. The pink UTC thread creates a great underbody for the dubbing. Tie in a strip of Large width pearl mylar for the shellback and a silver rib.

Take a decent pink of dubbing and dub into the thread to create an even ‘rope’, tapering slightly thicker towards the head. Wind the glister towards the eye – in touching turns – leaving enough room to tie in the rib and shellback. Pull the pearl over the back keeping it taught and secure in place with the silver wire rib. I’ve added a small piece of pink UV dubbing at the head of the fly to give it a small colour change. And that’s it! Simple, effective and efficient.

 

Fly of the Week – Grayling Pink Tag

Fly of the week Fly of the Week   Grayling Pink TagPink, as most fly fishermen will know is a well re-known colour for grayling. The lady of the stream is partial to any fly incorporating a spot of pink whether it’s a floss tail, pink glister thorax or a pink wire rib. These pink bugs seem to work particularly well once the Salmon make an appearance and start their spawning habits. The fixation on pink may be due to the amount of  ‘pink’ eggs being released by the female salmon. Or, in many cases, because a lot of anglers use it!

Slide a tungsten bead onto your hook, here I have used a silver bead; 3mm paired with a Kamasan B170 size 12. Secure your thread onto the hook and butt up against the tungsten bead to ensure it stays in place. Run the thread down the hook until the bend in the shank and prepare the tail. Cut a length of Glo-Brite floss and create a plump tail. I like to wrap the floss around my two fingers 8 times to get a good consistent thickness. You can get 4/5 flies out of each length so don’t throw away the off cuts!

Tie the tail in securely and take three strands of peacock herl for the body. The grayling like a mouthful so don’t skimp on the peacock. Tie the herl onto the hook and wrap around the thread, this will ensure durability of the herl as it is very prone to breakages. Wind towards the bead and tie off at the head. Take a brown hen feather, or in this case, a brown grizzle hackle and secure onto the hook. Two or three turns onto the hook and tie off. The hackle gives a lot of movement and helps the fly fool both trout and grayling in fast, medium or slow paced water.

Fishtec stock a full range of fly tying materials and Kamasan Hooks

Tying Material List

Hook: Kamasan B170 Size 12
Thread: Black UTC 70
Bead: Silver Tungsten
Tail: No 2 Glo Brite
Body: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Brown Hen

Fly of the Week – Sedge Hog

Fly of the week Fly of the Week   Sedge Hog

The Sedge hog was devised as a pattern to convert sedge feeders into fish on the bank. This pattern can be fished dry, pulled just on or in the surface or below the surface to attract fish feeding on sedges and other large insects. Part wet fly, part muddler. A very buoyant fly, this pattern gives some great disturbance to attract fish to other flies on your cast. competition bots use these as point flies regularly when other foam or buoyant flies need to be removed.

Attach a strong, but lightweight hook into the vice and run a layer of thread down the hook, here i’ve used a Kamasan B175. Take a pinch of natural deer hair, sort the longer fibers from the shorter fibers and put into a hair stacked. Repeat this proccess three times for the tail and two wings. Tie in one pinch of deer hair as a tail and secure in place.

Tie in a length of FlyBox Hackle in black for the first third of the body. After each turn, pull the fibers back so they don’t get trapped down and create a full sectioned body. Take the second bunch of deer hair and tie in as a wing, the same length as the tail. Take another colour of fritz , here i’ve used red to create a bibio style pattern. A great colour combination and fly for targeting heather fly feeders!

Take another amount of deer hair and tie in over the middle section of fritz. To finish off, neaten up the head with thread and make a few turns with the remaining black hackle at the head and tie off. Apply a small amount of varnish and the fly is read to use.

Fly of the Week – KJ Red Spinner

Fly of the week1 Fly of the Week   KJ Red SpinnerWith this not so fish friendly weather, most anglers stay in doors until the temperature drops enough not to get blistered by the sun. This usually means fishing into the evening until darkness falls, a magical time of day if you ask me. As the Dunns return to the water to lay their eggs (the end stage of the dunns life) it releases it’s egg sacks on the surface of the river, the Dunn becomes lifeless and is an easy target for any trout and can provide some of the BEST fishing you can ever find.

More commonly known as a sherry spinner, this pattern has proved deadly for me over the last few weeks, helping secure a team Gold in the Rivers International late June. 

Select a favourite dry fly hook, here I’ve used a Kamasan B170 hooks, a light-wire hook which boasts good strength, especially with the chance of hooking a monster. Run a layer of thread down the shank of the hook and stop just as the hook bends into the gape. You need a strong and reliable thread when tying this fly, try using UTC Thread 70 in brown, it gives a flat spread and practically disappears on the hook.

Select four red game feathers and tie them in as the tail. You can play around with the lengths of the tail to achieve the look that you want – I usually opt to make the tails the same length of the body. Tie in a pearl rib, here I’ve used a small pearl strand from a hank of krinkle flash. For the body, dub a rope of coppery/red dubbing onto the thread, just enough to cover 2/3rds of the hook shank.

Wind the dubbing in touching turns leaving sufficient room for a thorax. Run the rib in evenly spaced segments over the body and tie off.

Take a few strands of brown antron for the thorax cover, you can use any colour you like, but I prefer to keep things colour coordinated. For the wings, take two prime CDC feathers, strip the side of each one and remove the ‘crap’ at the bottom. Position on the top of the hook and secure with the thread. Repeat this three more times using each side of the two CDC feathers.

Dub more dubbing onto the thread and wind around the wings, covering the thorax. Pull the antron thorax cover through the bunch of CDC tips to split, this gives the impression of a spent dunn and allows you to see it at distance. You can also add a white CDC post over the back if you like to give it more visibility into darkness.

Fly of the Week – Red Holographic Sea Trout Tube

Fly of the week Fly of the Week   Red Holographic Sea Trout Tube
Red is another favourite for sea trout here in the UK, as well as blue (see last weeks fly of the week here), red has a massive following especially on certain rivers where Sewin seem to prefer a specific colour. This fly is one of our favourites here at Fishtec and has produced some of our best catches when we have time away from the office to get on the river! Give this combination a go, you may just be surprised of the results…

Start off by sliding an aluminium tube onto a tube fly needle and push tightly into the adapter. Here I have used the Eumer Tube Fly Vice, the perfect tool for tying tube flies. Run your thread onto the top of the tube and create a platform to tie the wing onto. This layer of thread will ensure the wind stays firmly in place and not slip through the thread.

Take a pinch of black bear and offer it up to the top of the tube, securing directly to the top side of the tube. Strip off a few strands of red Schlappen and tie in as a throat hackle. Remove the excess over the end of the tube and tie in two strands of Red holographic flash on each side

Take two jungle cock eyes, I prefer packed jungle cock as you get consistently sized feathers. Remove the excess and tie in over the same area of the blue holographic. Remove the waste and whip finish off. Varnish the head to secure the tying in place and you’re done!

Written by Kieron Jenkins

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