Category Archives: Fishing Tackle

For a fisherman, reading about fishing tackle is nearly as exciting as purchasing it! Below we aim to bring you the latest in fishing tackle trends, new and exciting products and tackle news.

Cwm Hedd Fishery Report October 2014

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A couple taken for the pot

Overall it’s been a cracking week at Cwm Hedd, with a hundred per cent catch rate Thursday-Saturday. Another hundred fish were delivered by Exmoor Fisheries on Friday, including a smattering of blues so the stock levels are excellent, with another top up coming soon. For those of you in need of more good cheer, the four hour ticket is now a five hour ticket, which will give you more time to find the fish and settle in for some good fishing.

Don’t forget to check out our facebook page for photographs: https://www.facebook.com/cwmheddlakes

Poppy fish: British Legion Competition 16th November 2014.

Even if you are not fishing the comp feel free to come along to the lodge with your nearest and dearest from 10am, where tea/coffee and cakes will be available for purchase via donation, with profit going to the British Legion. Any contribution to the raffle or cake table will be gratefully received.

Please contact me if you would like to come along and help in the lodge or with the comp.

Places are still available in the comp, but you need to enter soon to be sure of a place: £30 entry fee plus sponsorship. Free bacon roll, tea/coffee on arrival for competitors. Cash prizes totalling £215.00. Entry forms at the lodge or on www.cwmhedd.co.uk or download at http://counties.britishlegion.org.uk/counties/wales/events

Top anglers this week

One of this weeks top anglers was regular Ken Bowring, back to full form, taking one and retuning nine in less than three hours on a cats whisker and an intermediate line. Ken recommends short strips or fast figure of eights. Others on catch and release and also reaching their 10 fish total limit were Kens long time friend Roger Martyn (who also hooked a fabulous blue on a cats whisker and intermediate line); Roger Jones found success on a pink blob (floating line), Luke Thomas chose an olive lure (intermediate line), Graham Davies dazzled with a black and green fritz while Ken Pascoe scooped his limit on a diawl bach.

Plenty of others on catch and release took one and returned four or more, such as Bill Williams (daddy-long-legs), Lee Ashcroft (damsel, orange blob), Russell Evans (goldhead cats whisker), Rob Collier (black buzzer) and Ian Oxley.

Ian’s comment on facebook was very welcome: ‘great sport at Cwm Hedd today most [anglers] fishing in the morning but I had a very good session in the afternoon with seven fish all taken on a floating line with 12 ft leader and using damsel nymphs and had my largest fish all over 2.75 lb on an orange hopper. Almost all the fish were no deeper than two foot down and their condition was excellent and all fought well and returned apart from the first one as fishery rules -a policy I welcome as it stops fish becoming hookshy as many people now practice c&r’

Not surprisingly Sunday was the most difficult day with the pesky wind causing problems, so most anglers chose more clement days where they could more easily fish their favourite platforms and the hotspots, mainly the far bank and the main island, but also the bay and behind the main island.

Windswept and interesting

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One Sunday afternoon angler on his second visit of the week was Wales International Kieron Jenkins. Morning anglers had struggled with the wind and opted mainly for more sheltered platforms, so there were some inevitable blanks. Kieron would probably have a go at fishing in a hurricane and at 3.15pm he headed straight for the far bank where the wind was at its worst and of course where the fish were to be found. Kieron had already taken one and released two when I rang him to ask if he could take another four for family who fancied taking a rainbow home for tea. By 5pm, Kieron had caught them all (on a black and green lure and an Airflo 40+ Intermediate fly line) and had also gutted and filleted them, so with five taken and two returned it was a great finale to the week.

Untitled 1 Cwm Hedd Fishery Report October 2014

Filleted Trout for Tea

It’s all in the planning

Others have also been in the right place at the right time for some speedy catching: on Wednesday, Terry Williams took five rainbows in under 2 hours on a cats whisker, orange fritz and a black fritz.

New faces

It’s always good to see new faces alongside the regulars: Andy Gill took one and returned two on a small damsel and a slow glass. Shane Malson and David Price each took one (cats whisker and black daddy); young Kieron Martin gave dad Peter a hand to take one rainbow on a cats whisker and novice angler Gareth Neale took one on a blob on an intermediate line. Congratulations to another novice angler Dan McGhee – who took his first rainbow this week in quite tricky weather conditions. Dan was on the tip of the main island, using a cats whisker and a floating line.

Legend

It was also a pleasure to welcome legendary rod builder Owen Caudle this week, fishing Cwm Hedd for the first time. Owen took three rainbows on goldhead cats whiskers and intermediate lines, saying that the fish had obviously ‘had their Weetabix’!

Angling development

I’m hoping to get some angling development sorted out, with my thoughts being that the following might be of interest/benefit, but let me know if there is anything else, so I can plan, as it needs to come from what you anglers or budding anglers want!:

Taster/beginner sessions (juniors)
Taster/beginner sessions (adults)
Novice development for juniors
Novice development for adults
Master classes e.g casting general/casting into the wind/ fly tying

This is in the very early stages of planning, so I don’t have any details, dates or cost yet. I’m hoping to provide some free or at a minimal cost on a non-profitmaking basis though.

Opening hours: Monday and Tuesday closed; Wednesday-Sunday: 8am til sunset; last admission: 2 hours before sunset. We’ve got one of those widget things on our web site now that tells you the sunset times for Cwm Hedd; I’ll see if we can get one that does the weather and wind speed as well. By next Sunday sunset will be 4.45pm, so last admission will be 2.45pm from Wednesday-Sunday this week.

 

Cwm Hedd Lakes Fly Fishing Report – Opening Week

cwmhedd1 Cwm Hedd Lakes Fly Fishing Report   Opening Week
Opening weekend fishing report 19th October 2014 (posted a few days late!)

In contrast to a wild and windy Sunday the near perfect conditions on Saturday brought a great turnout of keen anglers to Cwm Hedd for opening day. The season got off to a flying start as rain held off on a mild and mainly overcast day with the occasional glimpse of sunshine and a fairly gentle breeze.  The quality fish stocked in the last two weeks by Exmoor fisheries have been finding their way around the lake and provided good sport for anglers.

Although some rainbows opted for tentative takes followed by a hasty retreat, and some anglers were simply unlucky, over a hundred rainbows were brought to the bank over the weekend, with the hotspots being the tip of the main island and the far bank. Top rods reaching their ten fish limit on Saturday were Mike James and Carlo Bertorelli, with Mike taking two and releasing eight on an orange fritz, an apps bloodworm and a damsel (all on a midge tip fly lines), while Carlo opted for black and silver mini lures to take one and release nine.

As regulars know well, fishing Cwm Hedd can test the skills of the even the most experienced anglers, so it is always a pleasure to see young anglers prepared to take up the challenge and being rewarded for their perseverance. Thomas Morgan and Luke Jenkins both took fish, each using floating lines: Thomas on a montana and Luke on a white and yellow cats whisker. Well done!

Top rod on Sunday was regular John Belcher, one of the hardy few who braved the high winds to take two rainbows and release seven on his own green and white lure with an intermediate line. Taking a breather at the lodge to fortify himself with bread pudding and tea, John reported that an immediate retrieve with a fast figure of eight produced the most success.

With the temperature due to drop further in the next few weeks anglers can look forward to some great fishing at Cwm Hedd. Let’s hope that the tail end of hurricane Gonzalo doesn’t wreak too much havoc!

Opening hours: Monday and Tuesday closed; Wednesday-Sunday: 8am til sunset; last admission: 2 hours before sunset. Sunset this week is approximately 6pm (5pm on Sunday as the clocks are going back on the weekend)

Tel: 01633 896854 (lodge during opening hours); 07813 143 034 (any time/day before 6pm)

Poppy fish: British Legion Competition 16th November 2014. £30 entry fee plus sponsorship. Only 15 places left!

Cash prizes totalling £215.00. Entry forms on www.cwmhedd.co.uk or download at   http://counties.britishlegion.org.uk/counties/wales/events

Entry forms also available at Cwm Hedd lodge from this weekend.

Thanks to those who have kindly donated prizes for the raffle – all prizes gratefully received!

Croesheolydd Farm, Bassaleg, Newport, NP10 8RW. 5 mins J 28 M4
www.cwmhedd.co.uk | email: info@cwmhedd.co.uk | Cwm Hedd Facebook Page

2015 TF Gear Babes Calendar

tfgearbabescalendar blog 2015 TF Gear Babes Calendar

It’s back! The ever impressive TF Gear Babes calendar has arrived at our warehouse and is ready for sale, along with a dozen beautiful images of our favourite babes, and carp of course!

It’s just 9 weeks until Christmas and many have started their shopping already, but what do you buy an angler who already has all the carp fishing tackle under the sun?

The 2015 TF Gear Babes calendar is the ideal stocking filler to spruce up an office, garage or fishing tackle room, with a beautiful babe holding Common and Mirror carp for every month of the year!

Price: Just £9.99!

Click here to purchase the TF Gear Babes Calendar!

TFGear Fishing Babes 2015 Calendar 1 2015 TF Gear Babes Calendar

Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary October/November 2014

Alan dabs at Seabrook Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary October/November 2014


Alan Yates with a bag of dabs and a goer bass which won him a match from Seabrook’s Princes Parade with 8lb 4oz.

Midway through October and still the weather is mild and relatively settled. Yes we are enjoying an Indian summer and for the shore anglers it’s been a long spell of mixed fishing with the crossover of summer and winter species somewhat prolonged this autumn. Could be that this is now becoming the norm with the mixed fishing lasting later into the winter every year due to global warming. Whatever, it’s welcome for sure. Only this week I landed a mixed catch of dabs, bass, whiting, codling, smoothhound and dogfish from my local pier and beaches. Fishing the Prince of Wales pier inside Dover harbour the anglers next door landed two smoothhounds, mine was just a goer, but the specimens landed by Kyros Andrea from Tottenham both topped the 6lb mark, both took a large squid bait. Kyros is a retired trucker who regularly travels to Dover to fish and these were his best ever smoothhounds.

Kyros Andrea Totenham 6lb hound Prine of Wales Dover Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary October/November 2014
A surprise bass amongst the dabs at Seabrook whilst using braid line on the new Continental beach caster caused me some excitement and those codling seem to be showing all around the UK, even in the sunshine and so it’s going to be a shock for many anglers when the weather does eventually change to winter. Looking at the continuous south westerly storms that are buffeting us, that all too familiar winter weather blocking pattern will soon introduce more easterly and northerly winds and lower temperatures. Anglers in the North Sea will be rubbing their hands together at the prospect of onshore winds and more cod and here in the south when its calm nothing beats a calm sea and a frosty beach to spice up the night time whiting fishing..

However, now is a time to get serious with your beach fishing and going out prepared for the weather is an important factor. The waterproof thermal suit, a beach shelter or brolly, chest waders, warms socks, a hat and a flask are all essential to survival when the weather gets mean. Also important are the means to continue fishing when the wind blows and the sea swells. I pack a few heavier grip leads in the tackle box, those 7oz Breakaway green tops in fixed wire take some beating, although if it gets extreme then it’s a Gemini yellow head 7oz and nothing sticks like they do. Lots of anglers forget that the importance of a heavy lead apart from it anchoring to the sea bed is that it punches through the wind and tows baits far more efficiently than lighter leads. Which go off course in the wind. Bait clips also help you gain extra yards by tucking the bait snugly behind the lead for a more streamlined rig and bait. Now is the time to get your sea fishing tackle right. Make up a few rigs for extreme weather – the Pulley Pennell is a great choice for wind and sea both on rough and smooth ground and it’s the easiest clipped rig to make yourself. Lots of anglers also boost up their rig hook snood line to 25lb to combat conditions and that chance of a bigger cod.

One of the biggest winter mistakes made by many sea anglers, especially beginners is using too big a bait. OK big bait, big fish – that’s true, but a large bait is of no use if you cannot cast it far enough to reach the cod. So compromise between bait size, bait clips and lead size to maximise distance with your biggest bait and don’t fall into the giant bait fished in the gutter trap!!!!

The other common mistake of the novice is to recast a washed out bait. Replace your hook bait fresh every cast, fresh worms etc means a fresh scent so the bait scent trail the previous cast set up is continued. Casting timing is also important, keep an eye on how long your bait lasts against crab and small fish attacks and set you timing between casts around that.

The major problem once the cold weather arrives is obtaining bait. Lugworm prices go up every year as the worms become hard to come by. The problem is that the army of part time summer diggers cannot dig or pump enough worms to make it worth their while and generally it’s only the real professionals that dig all winter. Thus fewer worms and a bigger demand make bait scarce and easy for diggers and dealers to hike the price. One solution is to collect your own, although many will quickly find out that’s easier said than done. Winter lugworm digging in stair rod rain, frost and decreasing daylight is not easy. (Try it and you may not complain about the price or how small the worms are again!)
There are a few solutions and one is to freeze your lugworms. Black lugworms freeze best and when using them, tying them on with bait cotton makes keeps them more intact and on the hook because they do go soft. Frozen baits can be used to extend a limited supply of fresh although lots of anglers swear by frozen on their own. One tip – Treat frozen bait like you would your food, would you eat sausages that have been in the freezer for four years!

Sort your frozen bait in terms of how long it’s been frozen. Frozen lugworm from the spring tides can be used a week or month later when the tides are neap. That’s the way to manage frozen bait and not keep it for years!

Frozen squid is easy enough to buy earlier in the year in bulk, it’s cheaper. Break down into smaller amounts and store in the freezer and on some venues it’s all the bait you need, although for the current crop of codling fresh yellowtails or blacks take some beating.
You can obtain a supply by looking after your dealer – How many anglers buy their gear on the internet and then only visit the dealer when they are desperate for worms, small wonder he has none he will be looking after his regulars. So keep it in your mind to keep in with the local fishing tackle shop and with luck you will get a supply.

Tight lines,

Alan Yates

Fishtec/Celtic League Match 2014 Results

celtic league match winners 525x277 Fishtec/Celtic League Match 2014 Results

Nymphomaniacs – League winners 2014

For the past 8 years, many Welsh anglers have been competing in what’s called the Celtic League match, a competition devised by competition anglers to get us out on the water more often, different times of the year, and fishing with anglers of all abilities. One of the best ways of anglers learning to ropes of competitive angling.

The competition is based on a catch and release basis, with your fourth fish being timed and your total catch verified by your boat partner. In previous years some competitions were being won with over 30 fish a day!

Chew Valley has been a great venue for the past two years with many quality trout being taken all throughout the year on a range of methods, fly lines and flies – A great top of the water venue if you’re looking for some nymph or dry fly fishing.

The last comp of the year was held last Sunday with favorable conditions for most of the day. A misty start saw many anglers head to Villace Bay and Woodford bank, a popular area for both boat and bank anglers and some five boats headed north towards the Dam. By 11am the mist had lifted and a slightly chilly northerly breeze had arrived, the fishing was good for the first two hours until the chill put a dampener on fly hatches, towards the end of the day there was a slight rise in temperature and the fish switched on somewhat, giving anglers a chance to get a last fish or two!

The results were as tight as always and many were keen to know the outcome. In such a competition where your final scores are dependent on each angler of the teams performance, positions can change drastically. A blank will give an angler maximum points, a disaster if the team is just a few points ahead or behind another.

As main sponsors, Airflo, gave an impressive goody bag to each angler who fished the league throughout the year, fishing reels as prizes for the first three teams, a fly rod for individual and a free fly line for each heat winner and runner up.

Teams

1st – Nymphomanicas
2nd – Team Cwmbran
3rd – Harvey Angling Margam

Individual

1st – Mark Thomas, Harvey Angling Margam

Full results aren’t available as yet, but will be uploaded when posted.

 

Low Water and Light Fishing Tackle

Big Trout Small Fly 525x349 Low Water and Light Fishing Tackle

Like the weather, a river is changed by the seasons. In October the Henry’s Fork flows are at about 25% of peak summer levels and the resulting changes in the fishery are multiple. This essentially applies to the slow water sections beginning at Last Chance Run and extending through Harriman to the water below Pine Haven.

This is mostly wadeable water even when downstream agricultural demands push release of water from Island Park Reservoir to 1,000 cfs and above. Storing water for the coming year begins in early Fall when flows are reduced to around 300 cfs and often lower. Responding to a rather radical and abrupt change in their environment, trout begin to concentrate in winter habitat that features greater security in terms of water depth and structure. What this means is that even though big trout may be found feeding in surprisingly thin flows of a foot or even less, they are seldom far from the sanctuary of deeper water. Awareness of this behavior will assist a visiting angler who might deal with finding fish when previously occupied water becomes seasonably devoid of opportunity.

While low water provides advantages in access and wading comfort fall fishing produces complications that are not nearly as pronounced at other times of the year.

Aquatic vegetation, a necessity in the welfare of trout and insects, grows densely in the higher flows of summer. Losing a good fish in the weed becomes an increasingly familiar disappointment as the season progresses.

Thin Water Trout 525x349 Low Water and Light Fishing Tackle

In the fall, vast expanses of exposed vegetation reduce the amount of open water in some sections and the tendrils are always close enough to the surface to disrupt the current and complicate fly presentation.

With only minor exception, fall hatches are small in physical size but their numbers can be astounding. Mahogany Duns in size 16 or 18 are a bonus through mid-October; otherwise you will be dealing with Baetis and midges if dry fly fishing is your objective. A size 18 is at the large end of the scale, and they range much smaller.

A high quality tippet of 6X or 7X is needed to accommodate imitations that probably average size 22. And while futility with regard to landing a big fish may instantly come to mind, bringing a 20 inch trout to net is not impossible even with such a delicate connection.

Upstream Connection 525x349 Low Water and Light Fishing Tackle

As a matter of practicality, tackle adjustments based on seasonal requirements will determine a particular rod, fishing reels, and fly line to accommodate the extensive variety of opportunity available during a year of fishing in Henry’s Fork country.

Fishing streamers and other large subsurface flies on still and moving water will call for a 7 weight to handle a long cast and truly big trout. I like a 6 weight for float fishing or wading during Salmon Fly time and the Golden Stone hatch. Both insects require patterns as large as size 4, and most are quite air resistant. The size 10 and 12 Green, Brown, and Gray Drakes are best handled by a 5 weight, especially when making a long cast to cruising trout on the flats of the Ranch. A 9 foot 4 weight is the rod I carry on most days when a fly larger than size 14 is not likely to be necessary and a cast beyond 50 feet is a rarity. Fishing the small dries and nymphs that typify fishing the shallow flows of October is, for me, best accomplished with a 3 weight rod.

Low, clear water, tiny flies, and easily alarmed trout combine for some of the most challenging fishing of the year, especially when weed altered currents enter the picture. In a game of enhanced precision and delicacy, the light weight and small diameter of a 3 weight line permit a more subtle and controlled presentation that will put the fly where it needs to be and with a reduced tendency to alert a wary trout.

Relying upon stealth to minimize casting distance, I rely primarily on a crisp action, 8 foot 3 weight rod for fishing the small hatches of fall. A lighter line and shorter rod can be efficiently coupled with a 12 foot leader, which is considerably shorter than what I would typically use with a heavier line and longer rod.

Keeping the distance to a target fish at 30 feet or less plays strongly into the accuracy of the cast and management of the drift. And of course, seeing a small fly is entirely dependent upon fishing at relatively close range.

An upstream cast from behind the fish is the most efficient method of approaching shy trout in thin water. Quite often, however, surface feeding trout are found tucked tightly against the bank, edge of an exposed weed bed or other locations where a different presentation angle is called for. A reach or curve cast from the side in these situations is less likely to disturb the fish than approaching from upstream where you will be far more likely to come into a trout’s window of vision before ever getting within reasonable casting range.

Controlling a big rampaging rainbow is never an easy proposition, regardless of the tackle being employed. However, a lighter action fishing rod will do a better job of cushioning a fine tippet and precarious connection to a miniature hook. A smooth functioning fly reel with a reliable, adjustable drag system is also an asset when playing large trout on very light tackle. Firm, relentless pressure can quickly tire a trout but you must concentrate on its every move and be prepared to release line the instant forceful movement away from you is indicated. And while luck is likely to ultimately determine the outcome, elevated skill in the techniques of playing and landing big trout can result in a very satisfying accomplishment.

Fishing small flies on light tackle is a fitting end to the dry fly season where thin, gentle currents and big, wary trout combine to demand our best. We are carried into the long winter by those fresh memories of crisp, fall days and rising trout. And as fly fishers, we survive until spring largely on the strength of those memories.

Low Water Rainbow 525x349 Low Water and Light Fishing Tackle

Hell Nino: Red tides, jelly fish swarms & sea lion famine

Drought in Northern Australia, wet and wild conditions in California, climatic disruption in South America, extreme cold in Northern Europe.

Just some of the consequences of the upwelling of exceptionally warm water in the equatorial Pacific, a phenomena known as “El Nino, ” or the “Christ Child”. The last such event was five years ago and now it looks like there might be another this autumn and winter, the result: misery for many millions of people across the world.

But how does the flood of warm water affect the marine environment and the people whose sea fishing tackle is their livelihood? Read on to find out.

Jelly fish swarms

Jellyfish swarm Hell Nino: Red tides, jelly fish swarms & sea lion famine

Image source: The Dancing Rest
Velella Velella everywhere!

This summer saw a biblical plague hit the Pacific coast of North America. From Southern California to British Columbia, a mega-swarm of billions of bright blue jellyfish filled the sea and littered the beaches with their rotting carcasses. The Velella Velella, or “by the wind sailor”, is a small creature with a stiff sail-like protuberance that stands clear of the water, enabling the jellyfish to go wherever the wind takes it.

Ocean warming caused by a possible El Nino event, is thought to have caused a spike in jellyfish numbers. Normally, the North Westerly prevailing wind off the coast of North America keeps the jellyfish far out to sea, but this year, strong Southwesterlies have made the Velella Velella run aground. Fortunately, though alarming to look at, the swarm is harmless to humans.

Sea lion famine

Sea Lion Hell Nino: Red tides, jelly fish swarms & sea lion famine

Image source: Wikimedia
Hungry pups are overwhelming rescue centres.

Thousands of dead and dying sea lions washed up on the shores of Southern California this summer. The problem is so bad that this spring, well over 1000 pups overwhelmed rescue centres in the area, and victims had to be taken to sanctuaries further north.

The the sea lions are victims of starvation – and El Nino may be to blame. The dissipation of shoals of anchovies and sardines caused by the sudden warming of the water off the coast of California, spells famine for sea lions and other marine mammals.

Red tides

Red Tide Hell Nino: Red tides, jelly fish swarms & sea lion famine

Image source: Wikimedia
Unusual looking, highly toxic to marine life.

A sudden bloom of harmful algae is a natural phenomenon. Coastal upwellings of cold, nutrient rich water fuel a rapid growth of algal cells that can turn the water to a reddish brown sludge. Such blooms can be highly toxic, poisoning marine life, killing corals and devastating fishing communities. In 2001, researchers discovered a 400 km stretch of reef off Indonesia, where all the coral was dead. The cause – El Nino.

In 1997, a severe drought in Indonesia, caused by El Nino, sparked uncontrollable wildfires throughout the region. It’s thought ash from the fires drifted East, falling in the sea off the Mentawai Islands. The iron rich particles fed an algal bloom that reached truly epic proportions. The decomposing plant matter leached all the oxygen from the water, killing everything in it for hundreds of kilometers.

Fishery collapse

Dying fisheries Hell Nino: Red tides, jelly fish swarms & sea lion famine

Image source: Monterey Bay Aquarium
Shoals of anchovies and sardines will disappear.

Where the deep ocean collides with Peru’s sharp continental shelf, an upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water provides food for spectacular shoals of anchovies and sardines. In turn, local fishermen depend on the resource for their income. The Peruvian anchovy fishery is worth billions of dollars each year, and the ground fish meal produced by factories along the coast supplies one third of the world’s demand for the product.

But when El Nino strikes, the cold water is replaced by warm currents, and the shoals of fish upon which so many families depend, disappear, literally overnight. Leave aside the ethics of turning edible, nutritious food into pellets to feed farmed salmon, this is a disaster for sea fishing families.

Coral bleaching disaster

Coral Bleaching Hell Nino: Red tides, jelly fish swarms & sea lion famine

Image source: Wikipedia
Normal coral behind bleached coral.

The coral triangle is often described as an “underwater Amazon”. It’s an area of incredible biodiversity spanning nearly six million square kilometers under the seas of Southeast Asia. El Nino is bad news for coral because warmer than average sea temperatures interfere with the coral’s ability to photosynthesize. As the thermometer rises, the coral fades to white and dies, a process called coral bleaching.

Already under pressure from global warming, the 1997/98 El Nino caused widespread coral bleaching in the region. And as environmental pressures stack up, it gets harder and harder for the delicate fauna and flora of the reefs to bounce back. Since the 1980s, experts say up to half the coral in the coral triangle has been lost and if there is an El Nino this year, some scientists predict a die off from which the reefs may never recover.

Alan Yates Filming the TF Gear/Sea Angler DVD

 

DSC2972 Alan Yates Filming the TF Gear/Sea Angler DVD

Alan Yates with a Pollack from the TF Gear DVD

I‘m just back from making a DVD for TF Gear and Sea Angler magazine with Chris Ogborne, Paul Fenech, Tim Hughes and on the camera Lloyd Rogers. We spent three days in the Camel estuary in Cornwall both boat and shore fishing. Sad to say that the shore fishing was not that good, although having selected the tides for the boat, it’s a case of not having your fish and eating them. Anyway the boat more than made up for the lack of shore bites with 13 species taken on a range of lures and bait from Optimus Prime, skippered by Rodney Keatley out of Rock.

We used a mix of light sea fishing tackle including virtual LRF and a decent pollack on the Blue Strike spinning outfit and 15lb braid tested the clutch finger during a drift close to Puffin Island. I persevered with live lance and joey mackerel, whilst the others used a mix of lures and bait with some surprising results – look out for the DVD on the front cover of a future issue of SA because it has loads of boat and shore tips and is free!

Tight lines,

Alan Yates

 

Airflo Pro Priests and Marrow Spoons

accessories Airflo Pro Priests and Marrow SpoonsAirflo have increased their range of brightly coloured fishing accessories to include the Pro priest and marrow spoon, two invaluable tools for the fly fisher.

The Airflo Pro priest measures 10 inches long, and is shaped like a mini baseball bat. Made from alloy it has an EVA foam grip and black cord wrist lanyard. For me the most important feature of a priest is that it has enough weight to humanly despatch a trout with just a couple if strikes. This one weighs 155gr (5.5oz) and has more than enough clout to do the job efficiently. It is comfortable and easy to grip, even when your hands are wet, cold and slimy.

The matching Airflo marrow spoon weighs just 68g (2.4oz) and is beautifully tooled froma solid but lightweight alloy – there are no sharp edges and it is very tactile. The ridged handle is inset with five silicone rubber rings to help with grip.

The spoon is a full  9inches long, just the right length for the task in hand, and three inches of that holds the trout’s stomach contents so you can easily see what it has been feeding on. There is also a cord lanyard so you can attach the spoon to your wrist or a D-ring on your waistcoat or jacket.

Both the Airflo priest and marrow spoon come in three colours: Aluminium, Blue and Red. (see pictures above)

The review can be found in issue 462 of Trout Fisherman.

Filming the new Airflo Fly Fishing DVD

camera Filming the new Airflo Fly Fishing DVD

When it comes to fishing, there’s nothing better than breaking out your rods and reels, stringing your desired fly line through the eyes of your favourite rod and casting out into the unknown… But, for many anglers that are stuck for time, they turn to the Internet, or in our case, fly fishing DVDs.

For those of you who struggle to get out on a regular basis we’ve been filming the new Airflo/Trout Fisherman DVD on the prestigious Bristol Water fisheries, Blagdon and Chew Water – The birth place of fly fishing some would say.

Iain Barr, Chris Ogborne and Airflo’s director Gareth Jones get together to film the new Airflo fly fishing DVD which will be available Spring 2015 FREE with Trout Fisherman. With Chris’s knowledge, Iain’s competition pedigree and Gareth’s enthusiasm for fly fishing, this DVD will be one to look out for.

Gar fish Filming the new Airflo Fly Fishing DVD

Both Gareth and Chris go through the ins and outs of bank fishing while Iain gives you the lowdown on reservoir fishing from the boat.

All three anglers talk about their experiences when bank fishing, giving you confidence in their ability and showing you exactly how they would approach the bank:

– Where to start at the lake
– What fly lines and fly fishing tackle to use for best presentation and distance
– Technical fishing clothing and luggage

Iain and Gareth are both extremely good, confident lake anglers, both competing at World level with Iain a previous World Champion, and Gareth lucky enough to get 3rd. Boat fishing is their THING:

– Where to start when boat fishing
– What fly lines to use for covering fish quickly and methods
– Technical fishing clothing and accessories

iain fish Filming the new Airflo Fly Fishing DVD

This new Airflo DVD is packed full of great techniques which you could put into practice on any lake in the country… and be successful.

Iain, Gareth and Chris give their top 10 lake fishing tips, with tips ranging from what colour flies to use when the fish go off to what knot to use to get the best movement and gain attraction.

The DVD isn’t just about fishing either, it features a whole selection of the new Airflo fly fishing tackle, featuring the new FlyDri luggage range, a new range of fly rods and a massive selection of accessories – More about that when the DVD comes out.