Category Archives: Fishing Tackle

For a fisherman, reading about fishing tackle is nearly as exciting as purchasing it! Below we aim to bring you the latest in fishing tackle trends, new and exciting products and tackle news.

2015 Airflo World Bank Masters

Cwm Hedd Airflo Barr Bank Masters 500x395 2015 Airflo World Bank Masters

Chris Jones Winner 2012

Fancy your chances of winning a £2,000 cash prize? Enter the 2015 Airflo World Bank Masters! 

The Airflo Bank Masters is now in it’s fourth consecutive year with the prize find growing year on year. With the first prize being £2000 (excluding other prizes), it’s easy to understand why this competition is still such a success!

With over 25 heats across the UK at recognised fisheries and still waters, and the opportunity to enter more than one heat to increase your chances of qualifying, why not enter the Airflo Bank Masters and try your hand at the fantastic cash and fly fishing tackle prizes?

Entry Fee: £29 – Which includes a free goody bag for your first entry only, then any additional entries are charged at £22 with no addition goody bag.

*Your free goody bag includes, an Airflo fly line and a pack of Iain Barr flies! (Worth well over £50 RRP)

Where can you fish?

Airflo Bank Masters 525x277 2015 Airflo World Bank Masters
The Final will be fished on the 18th of April 2015 at Elinor Trout Fishery

*Download your entry form here:
Airflo World Bank Masters Open Championships – Entry Form 2015

Nautical thieves: Video evidence!

TV shows like the BBC’s ‘Crime Watch’ showcase CCTV recordings of criminals in action, hoping for a all important tip-off that could lead to arrest.

Take a look at the following footage – fish-lovin’ thieves stealing the prize catch from innocent anglers. It’s unlikely any of these felons will do time, but the crime scene footage will raise a wry smile or two!

That’s a crime!

These two lucky guys pose with their catch of Mahimahi – how quickly their joy turned to sorrow…

Spearfishing gone bad

Ever been tempted to take up spearfishing? You’ll think twice once you’ve seen this…

Net hacker

No we’re not talking about the Internet – watch what happens when this whale shark encounters a full fishing net…

Cat burglar

This sneaky cat waited on the periphery and struck at the perfect moment. It might only be a quickie, but this one is comedy gold.

Place your catch with care

These guys might want to rethink where they put their catches, especially if this sneaky otter is about.

Refined tastes

This tech-loving octopus is more interested in this guys video camera and fishing tackle! Watch as the octopus successfully steals the camera and continues filming…

 

Rare Deep-Sea Greenland Shark


Sometimes watching footage of the seabed can be as exciting as watching paint dry, but when something like the mysterious Greenland shark appears where no-one has ever seen one before, people like Alan Turchik (National Geographic Mechanical Engineer) can get very, very excited indeed!

The camera which was placed 211 meters (700 feet) down on the seafloor and recorded over 3 hours of absolute nothingness, only to be briefly interrupted by a small jellyfish, but after staring at the sand for much of the time a Greenland shark bumped into the camera and lumbered through the frame! For a species which remains an enigma to scientists to the day, any new information such as sightings like this one – is invaluable.

Catching Turchik’s joyful reaction on camera expletive-filled reaction on film was pure luck. The cameraman Michael Pagenkopf wanted to take some shots of the team working on the boat for a film of the expedition, so he trained the lens on Turchik who was reviewing the video footage downloaded from the camera.

Just as Pagenkopf swapped his cameras battery and started filming, the picture on Turchik’s screen started bouncing around – It didn’t take long to hear how he felt about the sharks presence.

greenland Rare Deep Sea Greenland Shark

A Deep-Sea Enigma

These sharks are a conundrum, says Greg Skomal, a senior marine fisheries scientist at Massachusetts Marine Fisheries who wasn’t involved in the survey. Scientists aren’t sure how long the sharks live—a hundred years is one estimate—how big they get, or even if they’re predators or scavengers.

Based on the sharks’ stomach contents, “they seem to be chowing down on cod, wolffish, squid, and a variety of marine mammals,” says Peter Bushnell, a fisheries biologist at Indiana University South Bend. They may also be taking bites out of beluga whales.

 They can be as big as great white sharks, but that’s about as far as the comparison goes, growing to an estimated  7.3 meters (24 feet) long. With a maximum speed of just 1.7 mph and being mostly blind one would think they’re happy to eat rotting carcasses.

However, if the history of fishing is any guide, Greenland sharks are common as muck. The sharks were fished from the early 20th century until the 1960s; mainly for their liver oil, which was used as lamp fuel and industrial lubricant. In some years, over 30,000 were taken. That suggests a very healthy population.

In line with that, a recent expedition used 120 hooks on a longline, (not your normal sea fishing equipment!) and caught 59 sharks. “I think they’re fairly common,” says Aaron Fisk of the University of Windsor in Ontario. “When we want to catch them we don’t have any trouble.”

 

 

Quiz! What kind of fisherman are you?

Are you a hunter, a lounger, a competitor perhaps?

There are as many types of angler as there are anglers, from those who take their sea fishing tackle very seriously, to those who are more concerned with a snooze by the river.

And we thought, since it’s Christmas, why not have a little fun? Here we give you the chance to find out just what kind of fishing enthusiast you are!

bigstock Young man fishing on a lake fr 49801037 Quiz! What kind of fisherman are you?

What’s your ideal Christmas gift?

When you get to your favorite fishing spot, what’s the first thing you do?

When you catch a fish do you:

When fishing in company do you:

Later, you’re at the pub with friends do you:


Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

deeper54 525x269 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

The Deeper Fish Finder is a first of its kind in the world of wireless fishfinders, that work in conjunction with your Android or iOS device. Once connected Information from the floating Deeper is transmitted Via wireless Bluetooth technology negating the need for a cabled connection. Because of it’s light and compact design, it is suitable for use on a variety of vessels, platforms or fishing grounds.

With the Deeper Smart Fishfinder which is now available from Fishtec, you’ll only ever need one device to locate any possibly feeding fish. It’s completely portable, so you can fish places other fish finder’s can’t reach. From the shore, dock, kayak or boat. This unique wireless technology will help you gather intelligence anywhere you go. Once you attach the Deeper to your line, you will have instant information about fish, structure, depth and even water temperature – anywhere you cast.

deeper3 e1416396382447 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

The wireless sonar technology works in conjunction with Android and iOS tablets and Mobile Phones. No more wires! No more external batteries! No more frustrating weight!

Deeper, is a smart sonar for smartphones and tablets supporting Android 2.3+ and iOS 5.0+ operating systems. The smart sonar works in the depths from 0.5m to 40m (130 feet) and will transmit back to your device up to 50m away. The Deeper Wireless FishFinder uses a Bluetooth connection to show the information about the fish, the pond bed, water temperature and any obstacles you may bump into, all on the screen of a smartphone or a tablet.

A dual beam transmitted from the Deeper to the river or lake bed combines great detail and a wide coverage area, allowing you to gather as much data as possible about your fishing location.

What you get inside the box

Deeper Smart Fishfinder comes in a unique high quality material retail package. Smart angler kit includes: Deeper Smart Fishfinder – wall adapter – car charger – usb wire – mini pouch – attachment bolts – user manual. * Smartphone or tablet is not included.

deeper1 525x314 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Compatibility

The world’s most versatile sonar – Deeper Smart Fishfinder works with devices you already own, including Android tablets and smartphones, iPhones and iPads, however, not all mobile devices compatible.Made for: iPhone 5s, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5, iPhone 4s, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS and iPad Air, iPad (4th generation), iPad mini, iPad (3rd generation), iPad 2,iPad. Requires latest iOs version. Android smartphones – OS version 2.3 and later, screen size: mdpi-normal, hdpi-normal, xhdpi-normal. Android tablets -OS version 3.0 and later, screen size: mdpi-xlarge.

Deeper Smart Fishfinder application is compatible with more than 2500 different smartphone and tablet devices.

The Deeper App provides you with a detailed fishing calendar, integrated camera function, up-to-date weather reports, customized fishing log, integrated map function, and is fully integrated within social media networks Facebook, Twitter, and Google+. You can choose from different system of units, frequencies or languages. Sound alarms notifies about fish location, size or water depth. Import and export function allows to use multiple devices and to keep the data on the cloud services. This app is the perfect planning tool for outdoor activities. If you could not brag about great catches until today, with Deeper app you will always bring fish home.

  • Sonar function + 15 min data history log
  • Fish activity calendar
  • Camera
  • 5 days weather forecast
  • Used in Salt and Fresh water.
  • Fishing log
  • Online maps
  • Sharing via Facebook, Twitter, G+
  • Data backup on cloud

Available Accessoriesdeeper cover2 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

The Deeper FishFinder also features changeable skins (or covers) which allow you to change the colour of your Deeper to ensure you can see it at all times. At night, simply select ‘night fishing mode’ from the App on your device, and the Deeper will illuminate Deeper Coloured Covers/Skins, allowing you to see your Deeper wherever you’re fishing.

Available in four different eye catching colours for varied lights. deeper cover1 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Also available for the Deeper FishFinders is an additional Flexi Arm, the innovatively designed Mount Clamp grips various shapes and super slim objects (from 0.5cm; 0.2″). Quick release clamp makes it easy to move the mount between different places. A universal ¼ 20in (quarter twenty) male screw is compatible with RAM Mounts and most paddle sport track.

deeper flexi 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Your Deeper Fishfinder can be attached directly to any kind of boats, kayaks, canoes, float tubes or radio controlled floating devices with the Deeper Flexible Arm.

deeper flexi2 525x381 Deeper Fish Finder Now In Stock

Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary November 2014

The first big cod of the winter for the boats in the south east was from the Varne Boat Clubs cod open. Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary November 2014

Varne boat club angler with the first big cod of the season for the Kent dinghy group.

With codling showing all around the UK at present it looks as if we are in for a reasonable winter, although the question is will the fish survive the nets for next year when they will be considerably bigger, in fact big enough to greatly improve the quality of the UK shore fishing? That is yet to be seen, although even the most cynical will expect a few to survive to make the 6lb mark and they can really pull the string.

Back to the present and my return from a week in Portugal was greeted with the first frost of the winter, I drove back from Gatwick airport amongst the gritters and the reality of winter has arrived. For me it’s time to loose the summer garments and break out the winter sea fishing tackle including hoodies, thermals and swap the brolly for the full Hurricane shelter. Time also for those 8oz leads to go back in the tackle box for a spot of low punchy casting into the teeth of the gale – they do tow the bait well and make a great difference on the stormy beaches.

I have also given the bait pump an overhaul with new washers which always give it some extra suction and a soak in fairy Liquid makes them even better. I am a bit concerned I will not be able to hack it with my bad shoulder, but the simple fact is lugworms will be difficult to come by in the tackle shop and pumping your on is the only option. I have laid down a supply of frozen blacks in the freezer and they do work well, especially after Christmas when the dabs arrive and the constant storms means the fish are accustomed to finding dead smelly marine life unearthed by the slightest swell. In the meantime nothing beats a fresh out, juicy, black or yellowtail for those codling other than perhaps a peeler crab, although supplies of peelers too start to dwindle this month. Also watch out for those shellfish being washed up after an onshore wind – Cockles, butterfish, razor fish and the larger clams all make a hook bait, but do work best when they are being washed up. Here in Kent Dungeness can be littered with shells after a good blow and being just inside the Point at the right time you can fill a bucket. I particularly like those large red queen cockles which are great for codling, bass and dabs as well.

Another bait which comes into its own around Christmas is fresh sprat and herring, the whiting love it in strips or chunks, whilst here it’s renowned for the biggest dabs which are nicknamed “sprat dabs” because of their liking for sprat.

Reports suggest most regions of the country are reporting codling and it’s noticeable that

the bigger fish are in the estuary regions where there are lots of shrimps. The rough ground codling also seem to grow faster, whilst from the clean sandy beaches the millions of hungry whiting mean the codling are lean. Those whiting are a pest particularly after Christmas when the pin size fish invade the shoreline, but don’t dismiss fishing a live bait rig at this time because the bigger fish and a late bass are fond of those small whiting.

Looking into the New Year it’s a time when only the match anglers have fun in many regions. Once those bigger specimens of all species have left to spawn its tiddlers only, especially from the clean beaches. My advice is to head for the deeper water of the piers, rocks or the boats for the bigger fish.

Here are a few New Year shore competitions to look out for:

1st of January Holt SAC New Year Open at Kelling. Details from Mike 07858758669 / Peter 07769908480 /  holtseaanglers@gmail.com

3rd of January the Pembroke & District Angling Club. Air Ambulance Open at Amroth.

Fishing is 10:30pm until 2.30pm. £200 first prize for the heaviest bag flounders only. Reg Amroth Arms. Details: John 01437 563552

4th of January the Wyvern Open shore at Slapton Sands, South Devon.  Fishing is 1pm until 6pm. Tickets and details from Mike Spiller 01404 43397.

10th and 11th of January the Asso Two Day Open is being fished at Seabrook and Hythe in Kent. Fishing 12pm until 5pm. Pre book only. Limited to 120 Entries. Details: 07866 714497

11th January East Anglian League and open at Sizewell. Fishing 10 am until 3pm. Contact: Rob Tuck 07855 848967

25th of January the Amble Open. Fishing 9.30am until 2.30pm. Register on the day at the Radcliffe Club, Amble from 7am. Tickets local tackle shops. Entry fee £12 all classes. Contact Jimmy French on 01665 711007 or Tony Cook on 01665 602034.

25th January the Fords Sports and Social S.A.C 40th Open Beach Fishing Festival.

At Weston Shore, Southampton. Rolling Mill to Beach Lane Netley. Fishing 11am until 4pm. Entry Fee is £11, juniors £4. no pegging beach prior to signing in. Steve Eales 02380650519.

Finally, I am just back from a few days fishing in the Algarve, Portugal, my first holiday of 2014 and it was great to fish in the sunshine with the new Continental TF Gear beachcasters. Real light line fishing for some speedy gilthead bream. I was surprised by the

result and the trip lead to a feature in the New Year edition of Sea Angler magazine so look out for it.

The group of Portuguese plus mate Clive Richards I fished with on the Algarve. Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary November 2014

Tight lines,

Alan Yates

The Water Wolf Camera – Now in Stock at Fishtec!

waterwolf21 The Water Wolf Camera   Now in Stock at Fishtec!

The product we have all been waiting for! The Water Wolf Underwater Camera is now in stock here at Fishtec! But, make sure you’re quick to get these by Christmas, as many of these have already been snapped up over the weekend!

Believe it or not, the Water Wolf actually started off as a hobby, a small project among a group of dedicated anglers who wanted to know more about the happenings beneath the surface and how fish react to their lures and baits, as well as what they could see above the surface. All members of the water wolf ‘gang’ share a common love for fishing, engineering, cameras and gadgets.

After trying to get results with the existing cameras on the market, they all came to the same conclusion that the only way they’d succeed in getting the recordings they wanted was to actually build their own camera. They wanted a totally waterproof, easy to operate camera capable of capturing high quality, underwater stills and video, all of this with long battery life and a discrete presence in the water. The Water Wolf was born.

See how the Water Wolf works here.

The Water Wolf Camera is specially designed underwater fishing camera. 100% waterproof so you can film underwater in depths down to 100m. Shockproof to withstand the hardest casts, you can use this camera with confidence in any conditions.

Four hours recording when fully charged, the Water Wolf records incredible quality images and is perfect in any fishing environment. Easy to use, totally stable when moving through the water and supplied with three different add on weights to give different sink rates and filming angles. Supplied with add-on float to film in any bait fishing situation and its own EVA carry strap to mount the camera in numerous ways.

What’s in the box?

waterwolf1 The Water Wolf Camera   Now in Stock at Fishtec!

1. Water Wolf UW1.0 Underwater Camera
2. Stainless Steel Boom
3. EVA Float
4. Neoprene Pouch
5. Brass Weights (3 pcs)
6. USB Charging Cable

The Water Wolf HD camera is mounted to your line with a stainless steel boom (2), and it’s sink rate and angle can be adjusted using the three interchangeable brass weights (5) supplied. The camera operation couldn’t be more simple – On or Off – Zero technical jargon to get confused with and the internal battery which can be re-charged via the USB charging Cable (6) will last for around four hours, plenty long enough to fill a 16gb Micro SD Card (recommended) with high quality 720p 30fps fishing action!

Use the camera for casting, trolling, lure fishing or static bait fishing with or without the attachable EVA Float (3).

waterwolftechs The Water Wolf Camera   Now in Stock at Fishtec!

Much of our current stock here at Fishtec has already been snapped up by anglers looking to get the best underwater footage, with many Sea anglers and Carp Fishermen looking to add the Water Wolf Camera to their coarse fishing tackle.

And with much of the footage we’ve seen online, who wouldn’t want one! It really is this easy to use:

Arriving at Fishtec –  Just in time for Christmas! – These Water Wolf Underwater Cameras are forecast to sell extremely well, and priced at just £119.99, we’ve seen many Water Wolfs posted to their new owners already.

Also available for the Water Wolf HD Camera is the Accessories Pack, which can be purchased at the same time as ordering the camera on the Fishtec Website, featuring some useful mounts to suit almost any recording situation you’ve come across, enabling you to attach your new Water Wolf Camera to a boat hull, railings, windows, tripods, plus in the new year a special Carp Fishing Accessories pack will be available too. Ideal for all types of fishing.

What’s in the Water Wolf Accessories Pack?waterwolfaccessories The Water Wolf Camera   Now in Stock at Fishtec!

1. Locking plug
2. Camera holder
3. Tripod adapter
4. Ball joint
5. Railing/pole mount
6. Suction cup mount
7. Ball joint adhesive mount

As with any new product, we’ve had a lot of questions from interested customers, the most being the customer worried that they may loose the camera in a snag. But, with any fishing, you should always use a lighter hook length than mainline, allowing you to break your hook off, releasing the camera.

Having your fishing reels loaded with heavier line, preferably braid, will also help if you need to pull the camera free from weed and protect you from break offs when casting. Double check all of your knots and connections BEFORE you start fishing.

The Water Wolf Camera weighs just 66g on its own before adding the brass weights so be sure to use a fishing rod that can handle the casting weight of your lure PLUS the camera to get the best cast possible and to avoid rod breakages.

Taking these steps will drastically reduce the chance of you loosing your camera and if you are still worried, refrain from casting it near know snags and other dangerous situations. With everything in life there is a little risk involved but we reckon the very best videos will come from the anglers with sense of adventure! If you are concerned about losing the Water Wolf then maybe this gadget isn’t for you.

Water Wolf Underwater Camera FAQ

Q: How do I open the camera?
A: Wiggle the plug back and forth, you can then put your nail in the gap and open it. This takes a couple of times to master, but then it is easy.
You can also tie a knot in a piece of string, put it through the small hole in the plug and gently pull, until it opens.

Q: How do I close the camera?
A: Push the plug in with a turning motion. Turning the plug makes sure the o-rings are absolutely tight. This is very important when fishing deep. 

Q: Does the camera float or sink?
A: The camera floats. If the 6 gram weight is inserted, it still floats. If the 9 or 12 gram weight is inserted, it sinks.

Q: Will the housing scratch? 
A: The housing and lens is made from polycarbonate, the same material used for riot shields, so it is very though. It can be scratched, but this will not affect the function or waterproofness, only the outlook.

Q: How do I clean the camera?
A: Rinse it in lukewarm water, and dry it off with a soft cloth.

Q: How do I store/transport the camera?
A: When you are done recording, put the camera in the neoprene pouch, and secure the Velcro to close it.

Q: Why does the camera wobble at high speeds?
A: The UW 1.0 comes with three weights (6g, 9g and 12g) the 12g weight makes the camera stable in the water to about 5 knots, at higher speeds it starts to wobble.
How can I avoid that the camera tangles on the cast? Tie the line to the eye in the stick, do not use snaps or swivels. 

Q: How far should the lure be from the camera? 
A: The clearer the water is, the further away the lure can be. 40-80 cm is a good starting point.

Q: How can I tell if the water is clear enough for filming? 
A: If you can see 1 meter down into the water you should be able to record. The deeper your camera goes the clearer water you will need, in order to get enough light.

Q: How deep can I record video?
A: If the water is very clear, there is lots of light, and the sun is high in the sky you can record video at 50-100 meters. 

Q: Why is my video green?
A: Light has different wavelengths, because of this color disappears the deeper you record. Red color disappears around 5 meters, orange around 8 meters, yellow around 15 meters. This is why the recording ends up green.

Q: How can I tell if the camera is charged?
A: Connect the charger cable to the camera, and a power source. When the blue diode turns off, the camera is fully charged.

Q: Can I cast the camera?
A: Yes, the camera is shockproof, but casts longer than 40 meters may damage the camera.

Q: How far can I cast the camera?
A: 40 meters, casts longer than that may damage the camera

Q: What happens if the line snaps?
A: That depends on the setup. If the camera is setup to sink, it is most likely lost. If it floats it might surface.

Q: Can I order spare parts?
A: Please contact your local Water Wolf dealer.

Q: What micro SD card should I buy?
A: 16 or 32 GB. micro SD or SDHC card. 16 GB. will give you around 4 hours recording time, 32 GB. up to almost 5 hours, depending on water temperature.

Q: How deep does the camera go?
A: The camera is waterproof to 100 meters, if the camera is closed correctly.

Q: Can I use the camera as a web camera?
A: No.

Q: Can I film while charging the camera?
A:  No.

Q: Can I use the camera for ice fishing?
A: Yes.

Q: Does the camera record sound?
A: Yes, but through a small hole over the on/off button, so when the camera is closed you barely get any sound.

When you’re home from your first fishing trip with your Water Wolf Camera, the fun really starts! To make things easier for you, the team at Water Wolf have produced a short video showing how to download and edit your video – It’s extremely easy, and we’re looking forward to see your fishing footage! Don’t forget to upload a video to our Facebook Page, or Tag ‘Fishtec Fly’ in your video!

For more information visit www.WaterWolfHD.com!

Reflections on A Fly Line

rene harrop elite fly line5 525x349 Reflections on A Fly Line

Rene Harrop Streamer Caught Brown Trout

For nearly a decade I have enjoyed a position on the Airflo Pro Staff. Through that period I have gained tremendous respect and appreciation for the unsurpassed array of specialty fly lines that go far beyond anything I could have imagined before joining this esteemed group of remarkably talented anglers.

Like most in the sport, I enjoy many types of fly fishing. In my experience, the value of individual fly lines designed to specifically accommodate the widely diverse requirements of trout fishing’s many facets cannot be overstated, and I take full advantage of any line intended for an exclusive purpose.

As a trout fisherman living on the Henry’s Fork, however, my assigned duty has been to assist in the development of a line designated especially for refined presentation of dry flies and mostly small nymphs to large, selective, and wary trout. To this end, I am pleased and proud to have been a part in the arrival of the Airflo Super Dri Elite Trout Line. With all the requirements of the demanding Henry’s Fork covered, this line has gained the approval of some of the world’s most discriminating practitioners, and the number is growing daily.
While accomplishing the objective of creating what I consider to be a specialized line for precise presentation of mostly smaller flies on challenging water, what also has emerged is a quality of performance that may be even more important.

rene harrop elite fly line1 525x351 Reflections on A Fly Line

Trout Caught During Salmon Fly Hatch

Efficient testing of the Elite meant applying the new line in a variety of conditions and seasonal demands that by necessity could not be limited to my favorite type of fishing.
Fishing big dry flies and heavy nymphs from a drift boat on fast, bumpy water during a Salmon Fly hatch is vastly different than a delicate cast on slow, clear currents. Exchanging a 4 weight Elite for a 6 weight was all that was needed to comfortably handle the burly business of a different game.

I used the same 6 weight Elite for fishing my favorite still waters like Henry’s and Hebgen Lake when a floating line became appropriate, and the results were remarkably satisfying.
In late fall when cold weather testing became necessary, the 6 weight Elite was again put into action while fishing streamers in low water for big brown trout on the lower Henry’s Fork. Again, performance was far better than adequate and I never felt limited when fishing this line.

rene harrop elite fly line2 525x349 Reflections on A Fly Line

Rene Harrop 3 Weight Airflo Super Dri Elite

I found a 3 weight Elite to be perfect for the Fire Hole and other smaller waters in the Yellowstone region including several spring creeks.

Other examples could be easily used to demonstrate the amazing versatility of the Airflo Elite. It is difficult to imagine an angler who would not appreciate what is truly an all-around trout line.

rene harrop elite fly line3 525x349 Reflections on A Fly Line

Using the Super Dri Elite on Still-water improves accuracy

Fishy sayings debunked

Ever wondered why people say they’ve “gone fishin’” rather than “gone for a walk”? Or why carp are forever associated with complaining?

Ever stood on the riverbank and wondered why angling is called angling or why a kettle of fish is such a bad thing to be in? Wonder no more.

We’ve put our heads together to come up with solutions to some common fishing sayings – so next time you’re out fishing, all you need to think about is the fish.

Gone fishin’

Gone Fishing Fishy sayings debunked

Image source: William Scott
So have you actually gone fishing, or not?

You’d be forgiven for thinking the meaning of the term, “gone fishin” is so obvious it’s undeserving of a mention, but that’s where you’d be wrong. Because there’s a whole lot more to the popularity of the phrase than meets the eye.

Until 1951, in America, if a shop was closed and a sign in the window stated the proprietor had gone fishing, they probably meant they’d taken their fishing equipment and  – gone fishing. But then along came Bing Crosby and Louis Armstrong, and recorded a little ditty called “Gone fishin’” and hey presto, the phrase passed into the mainstream. Later re-recordings by Pat Boone and Gene Autry among others helped to cement the phrase in the public imagination so that now, if you’ve “gone fishin’”, you might have headed to the river bank, or equally, you could just be taking a break!

Kettle of fish

Kettle of fish Fishy sayings debunked

Image source: Alexpurs
The origin? Fish stew!

Two meanings in one cauldron with this one: a “fine kettle of fish” as in a bit of a pickle, and a “different kettle of fish” meaning something altogether different. But where does the phrase come from? Nobody seems to know for sure. However, like the sleuths we are, we did manage to track down a couple of possible explanations.

A kettle of fish seems to have been an 18th century innovation, possibly linked to a practice among Scottish Lairds of giving a “kettle of fish”. An outdoor picnic would be held by the banks of a river, where the nobles and their pals would wet a fly or two. To the delight of all, the catch would be cast alive into a big vessel of boiling water to be cooked and eaten.

Another explanation comes from over the pond in Newfoundland where 100 lbs of fish was called a “quintal, kintel or kental” It’s thought the word, “kettle” evolved through repeated mispronunciation.

There she blows

There she blows Fishy sayings debunked

Image source: Shane Gross
This phrase was bad news for whales.

Did you know peak oil actually occurred all the way back in 1846? Of course we’re not talking about Brent crude here, but that other oil boom of yesteryear – the sperm whale oil business. Up until the mid Victorian period, whale oil supplied lubricants and soap and was also used in the processing of textiles. But its main use was for lighting and spermaceti was the best oil money could buy. Scientists still don’t know what the oily contents of a sperm whale’s head is for, but back in the day, it was the brightest, cleanest burning oil money could buy.

A single sperm whale could supply as much as three tons of the stuff. “There she blows” was the battle cry of the whaling ship’s masthead lookout – and all too often, it spelt doom for an innocent creature. Whales were hunted to the very brink of extinction. What saved them? The invention of the light bulb.

Stop carping

Carping Fishy sayings debunked

Image source: Kletr
Poor carp have an unjustified reputation as a nag.

Ever been told (or told someone) to stop “carping”? Ever wondered what the poor old carp has done to deserve its reputation as a nag and a moaner, whilst really just trying to avoid your carp fishing tackle? The answer? Nothing. That’s because the verb “to carp” actually has nothing at all to do with the fish of the same name.

In fact, “carping” comes from Middle English – a form of English that was in use from the 12th to the 15th century. It was the lingo of Chaucer’s Canterbury tales and developed from Old English after the Norman invasion. In Middle English, the word was “carpen” or “to speak”, and this came from an even earlier old Norse word, “karpa”, which meant “to brag”. Relax – it’s not the fishes fault!

Angling

Angling Fishy sayings debunked

Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Richard III is to thank for angling.

Here’s a riddle: What has angling to do with a car park in Leicester? For the answer we need to travel back in time to the late 15th century and the very late, King Richard III. Before the murderous monarch cried, “my kingdom for a horse,” (according to Shakespeare anyway) was gruesomely killed and buried in what became a carpark, he may well have told his squire to pack some sandwiches, his fishing rod and an angle or two for a day’s fishing.

An angle is middle english for apex or tip, fishing is fishing, but fishing with a hook is angling. An angle is a fishing hook.

Cwm Hedd Fishery Report October 2014

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A couple taken for the pot

Overall it’s been a cracking week at Cwm Hedd, with a hundred per cent catch rate Thursday-Saturday. Another hundred fish were delivered by Exmoor Fisheries on Friday, including a smattering of blues so the stock levels are excellent, with another top up coming soon. For those of you in need of more good cheer, the four hour ticket is now a five hour ticket, which will give you more time to find the fish and settle in for some good fishing.

Don’t forget to check out our facebook page for photographs: https://www.facebook.com/cwmheddlakes

Poppy fish: British Legion Competition 16th November 2014.

Even if you are not fishing the comp feel free to come along to the lodge with your nearest and dearest from 10am, where tea/coffee and cakes will be available for purchase via donation, with profit going to the British Legion. Any contribution to the raffle or cake table will be gratefully received.

Please contact me if you would like to come along and help in the lodge or with the comp.

Places are still available in the comp, but you need to enter soon to be sure of a place: £30 entry fee plus sponsorship. Free bacon roll, tea/coffee on arrival for competitors. Cash prizes totalling £215.00. Entry forms at the lodge or on www.cwmhedd.co.uk or download at http://counties.britishlegion.org.uk/counties/wales/events

Top anglers this week

One of this weeks top anglers was regular Ken Bowring, back to full form, taking one and retuning nine in less than three hours on a cats whisker and an intermediate line. Ken recommends short strips or fast figure of eights. Others on catch and release and also reaching their 10 fish total limit were Kens long time friend Roger Martyn (who also hooked a fabulous blue on a cats whisker and intermediate line); Roger Jones found success on a pink blob (floating line), Luke Thomas chose an olive lure (intermediate line), Graham Davies dazzled with a black and green fritz while Ken Pascoe scooped his limit on a diawl bach.

Plenty of others on catch and release took one and returned four or more, such as Bill Williams (daddy-long-legs), Lee Ashcroft (damsel, orange blob), Russell Evans (goldhead cats whisker), Rob Collier (black buzzer) and Ian Oxley.

Ian’s comment on facebook was very welcome: ‘great sport at Cwm Hedd today most [anglers] fishing in the morning but I had a very good session in the afternoon with seven fish all taken on a floating line with 12 ft leader and using damsel nymphs and had my largest fish all over 2.75 lb on an orange hopper. Almost all the fish were no deeper than two foot down and their condition was excellent and all fought well and returned apart from the first one as fishery rules -a policy I welcome as it stops fish becoming hookshy as many people now practice c&r’

Not surprisingly Sunday was the most difficult day with the pesky wind causing problems, so most anglers chose more clement days where they could more easily fish their favourite platforms and the hotspots, mainly the far bank and the main island, but also the bay and behind the main island.

Windswept and interesting

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One Sunday afternoon angler on his second visit of the week was Wales International Kieron Jenkins. Morning anglers had struggled with the wind and opted mainly for more sheltered platforms, so there were some inevitable blanks. Kieron would probably have a go at fishing in a hurricane and at 3.15pm he headed straight for the far bank where the wind was at its worst and of course where the fish were to be found. Kieron had already taken one and released two when I rang him to ask if he could take another four for family who fancied taking a rainbow home for tea. By 5pm, Kieron had caught them all (on a black and green lure and an Airflo 40+ Intermediate fly line) and had also gutted and filleted them, so with five taken and two returned it was a great finale to the week.

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Filleted Trout for Tea

It’s all in the planning

Others have also been in the right place at the right time for some speedy catching: on Wednesday, Terry Williams took five rainbows in under 2 hours on a cats whisker, orange fritz and a black fritz.

New faces

It’s always good to see new faces alongside the regulars: Andy Gill took one and returned two on a small damsel and a slow glass. Shane Malson and David Price each took one (cats whisker and black daddy); young Kieron Martin gave dad Peter a hand to take one rainbow on a cats whisker and novice angler Gareth Neale took one on a blob on an intermediate line. Congratulations to another novice angler Dan McGhee – who took his first rainbow this week in quite tricky weather conditions. Dan was on the tip of the main island, using a cats whisker and a floating line.

Legend

It was also a pleasure to welcome legendary rod builder Owen Caudle this week, fishing Cwm Hedd for the first time. Owen took three rainbows on goldhead cats whiskers and intermediate lines, saying that the fish had obviously ‘had their Weetabix’!

Angling development

I’m hoping to get some angling development sorted out, with my thoughts being that the following might be of interest/benefit, but let me know if there is anything else, so I can plan, as it needs to come from what you anglers or budding anglers want!:

Taster/beginner sessions (juniors)
Taster/beginner sessions (adults)
Novice development for juniors
Novice development for adults
Master classes e.g casting general/casting into the wind/ fly tying

This is in the very early stages of planning, so I don’t have any details, dates or cost yet. I’m hoping to provide some free or at a minimal cost on a non-profitmaking basis though.

Opening hours: Monday and Tuesday closed; Wednesday-Sunday: 8am til sunset; last admission: 2 hours before sunset. We’ve got one of those widget things on our web site now that tells you the sunset times for Cwm Hedd; I’ll see if we can get one that does the weather and wind speed as well. By next Sunday sunset will be 4.45pm, so last admission will be 2.45pm from Wednesday-Sunday this week.