Fishing equipment

The Hardcore Boilie Air Dry Bag

Drying your boilies – whether you’re on the bank or at home – has never been easier with this boilie air dry bag. 

The TF Gear boilie air dry bag gives your bait complete circulation to dry out. With its easy dry mesh construction this ingenious piece of fishing tackle can be handle-hung or stood on its base to get the very best ventilation. Once your boilies have dried off, the large or standard TF Gear boilie air dry bag will continue to keep them fresh, firm and always in peak condition.

View the TF Gear Boilie Air Dry bag here

boiliebag The Hardcore Boilie Air Dry Bag

Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary February/March 2014

8lb summer flounder out of New York Alan Yates Sea Fishing Diary February/March 2014

New York plaice like bling too!

One of the worst winters on record for weather has taken its toll on shore and boat angling, not only venues made unfishable but piers damaged and closed, charter hours lost, competitions cancelled and a general feeling of when will it end? Well so much doom and gloom, but it has its upside and that is that the commercial nets have also been hit hard and a few extra small fish may have survived the winter this year and that may improve the fishing in the spring…

I have taken some time off to sort some of my fishing equipment and generally plan ahead – the Spring IS just around the corner and although those last few weeks can drag, it will get here. OK so I have more terminal rigs that Gerry’s of Morecambe, all my reels are loaded with new line and my tackle box is pristine. All I need is to get out on the beach for a few casts, but that’s just not going to happen until the sea flattens off and clears. First up is a plaice trip but as I said, red spots don’t like coloured, rough or silty water – Chesil Beach at Cogden is a favourite venue to head for, but only when that sea settles! In the meantime the tackle box retains my attention and one of the many jobs I keep promising to do but never get around to be replacing grip wires in my lead collection. Normally when a wire or a bead on a lead goes, I dump it in the throw away bucket for fishing the Irish rocks, or Samphire Hoe. It’s essential when fishing rough ground to have plenty of spare leads and to not worry about losing them. But the throw away bucket is overloaded so its wire cutters, pliers, beads and wire time.  The tasks brings about several options, for starters you can change the shape colour of the breakout beads, I hate blue and yellow and prefer red and so replace this missing etc with round  red beads, make sure you use decent strong plastic beads because some smash just looking at the beach. You can also change the grip wire length, bend them differently or simply straighten out and upgrade the lead in general. Whatever, the result is a box of new functional leads.

Another worthwhile spring clean job, is your sea fishing rods, because if you look closely you may have a cracked ring. After the countless times my rod has been pulled off the rest this winter I will be surprised if I haven’t got a ring that need replacing. The beauty of Fuji’s, Seymo and the other top makes is that they take lots of shit, but even the best cannot survive many more than one a gale driven clatters on concrete, rocks or beach stones and can be damaged and it pays to look.

First wash the rod free of sand, weed and all the other crud it has collected with use and give the rings and the reel seat the once over with a tooth brush. This will remove most of the unwanted and reveal the ring back at its best. Reel seats really benefit from a good scrubbing and you will find them less likely to jam afterwards. Examine the rings closely under a good light, the smallest crack can skim whisks of mono almost unnoticed. Of course losing a ring is a disaster on a beachcaster – it’s like scratching the door on a new motor UUURRGHH!!! For me it’s the menders and I mean specialist rod repairs not DIY. Sometimes an on the beach a temporary repair may be required and that’s fairly simple. I cut one leg of the rig whipping off. Wriggle the other ring foot free and remove the ring. Insert a new ring in the whipping and then tape up on the other side – good as new, for some!

One economic way to re-invent a tired beachcaster is to replace the shrink wrap handle. Most tackle dealers nowadays offer a range of different types, colours, materials of shrink wrap. You can buy it to the length required and simply shrink it on. Don’t be tempted to do it over the old handle though, remove this and thoroughly wash and dry the rod section before putting on the new shrink wrap. To close down the shrink wrap tightly you can use a hair drier, whilst boiling water from a kettle spout is more dangerous, it does a better job!

Best of all the rod refurbishments are those offered by lots of the major firms – Send your rod back to them and for a fee they will replace it to its original glory, well worth the money if you are fussy about your sea fishing tackle.

Already there are rumours about plaice – the first sunny day for months and tall plaice stories have started. Now let’s get one thing clear before we start talking about plaice. They are frail, thin and pasty when they first arrive inshore in March after the vigour’s of spawning and not worth eating or retaining so please unhook carefully and return. In a matter of months they will be returned to their red spotted plumpness and then will be prized for the table.

Time now to make up a few rigs with the usual plaice bling, beads and glitter, my tendency is to make the bait stop on my clipped rigs the bling and there are lots of options ranging from pop up bead, plastic beads, luminous beads, sequins, glass beads, vanes, luminous tubing etc. Don’t skimp either plaice often respond the flashiest hook bait and the rule is anything goes!

A recent letter in Sea Angler magazine criticised me for keeping (and grinning) with a catch of small dabs and whiting (4 dabs and seven whiting) Now excuse me, but I eat a lot of fish and the number I retained that day was a small percentage of that caught and returned – You see there is not much else in the sea around the UK coast in winter and I enjoy a few dab and whiting fillets.

Tight lines

Alan Yates

 

Moment of Truth – Rene Harrop

IMG 9016 Moment of Truth   Rene Harrop

There is no time when the experience of losing a special trout carries anything but a sense of disappointment. However, the emotional pain of watching an exceptional adversary swim free when only a successful application of the landing net at the end of a spirited battle stands between the exhilaration of complete victory and total deflation is nearly indescribable.

You learn early on the Henry’s Fork that many things can go wrong when the hook is small, the tippet is fine, and the trout are often very large. Developing skills dedicated to preserving a precarious connection to a big fish is only marginally secondary to perfecting the ability to present a fly in a manner that will allow the battle to begin.

In both instances, much depends on the quality of the fishing equipment being used but mental and physical components also apply to the process of hooking and successfully bringing a meaningful trout to hand. Most who desire advancement in fly fishing understand the need for learning that comes only with experience and practice, and this is where the problem lies in gaining the ability to close the deal when finish line is clearly in sight.

From my own experience and also while watching others, it has become clear that the true drama lies at the very end of a battle between angler and trout. This means that it is not weathering a 100 yard run into the backing or surviving a series of tail walking leaps across the surface. Instead, the most intense pressure occurs when the trout is near surrender and the angler prepares to put the net into action.

Gaining the opportunity to practice netting skills is entirely dependent upon having everything go right prior to the time when the prospect of actually landing the fish becomes real. With an average tippet size of 6X and a fly usually size 16 or smaller, landing a trout in the 20 inch class is seldom greater than a 50-50 proposition. This means that even on a good day when 3 or 4 fish in this category are hooked, there may only be one or two times when the net will actually come into play.

The tendency to become almost uncontrollably excited is a difficult reaction to overcome when it becomes evident that the strength of the fish has begun to wane. In moving water, this generally occurs when it grows weary of revisiting both pressure from the rod and the force of the current.

When possible, leading the fish to shallower water of lower current velocity is preferable to allowing the fish to maintain the advantage of depth and water force. At this point, it is a mistake to allow a false sense of urgency to cancel the practicality of creating a condition that improves the likelihood for a favorable outcome. And while complete calm is seldom possible, applying patience and mental discipline are key in resisting the temptation to rush the netting process.

For a wading angler, the typical landing net features a short handle, a 20-22 inch bow, and a deep mesh bag. And while a net of these dimensions may be rejected by some as being too small, correctly applied landing techniques will usually accommodate a trout of 2 feet and even slightly longer. Carrying a larger net with the notion that its size will cancel poor decisions of technique is, in my opinion, erroneous behavior.

Through trial and error over many years of hunting big trout on the Henry’s Fork and other waters of the western U.S., I have developed preferred tactics that apply when fishing wadeable water. When organized into a systematic process, these principles incorporate proven ways to minimize disappointment at the end of an otherwise successful encounter with a hard earned trophy.

Identification of the best area to control the fish in preparation for landing should be made well before the thought of reaching for the net enters the mind. Often times, simply leading the fish close to the bank and away from the main current will create the advantage needed to overcome its ability to resist capture. Other situations may require moving some distance downstream to access water of less depth and current speed than where the main fight takes place. Trout will use leverage provided by depth and current against the resistance of the rod in an effort to become free from the restraint. This effort intensifies when the angler comes into view, and the close presence of the net can evoke a violent reaction of panic.

A tired trout in slow, shallow water can be more easily held in position while the angler closes the distance between them. Given a choice, I will always position myself upstream from the fish in preparation for landing. Reeling while moving toward the fish is often preferable to trying to bring it upstream, especially if significant distance is involved. Firm pressure with the fishing rod along with slow and careful movement work together in helping to keep the fish calm as final approach is made. Always important in any phase of playing a big trout, concentration is especially critical in the ability to react quickly to any sudden movement that can bring last minute freedom to the prize.

In general, I consider 1½ times the rod length to be the right amount of line and leader separating the rod tip from the fish, and I will not touch the net until this finishing point in the approach is reached. As resistance from the fish becomes noticeably weakened, I will begin to apply upward pressure with the rod while holding the line between the index finger and the handle. With superior control, I can begin to bring the fish into netting position by stripping the line rather than trying to use the reel. As the distance is shortened, lifting the head above the surface with the rod tip will help to negate the trout’s ability to use the current against you because it cannot swim in this condition.

IMG 5963 Moment of Truth   Rene Harrop

With the trout within an arm’s length and aligned with the current, I will free the net from its magnetic holder and position it directly upstream from the exposed head. The body of the trout should be parallel with the surface of the water before the net is lowered to allow the front rim of the bow to pass beneath the head. With the ventral fins as a guide, I will lift the net when the heaviest portion of the fish is directly over the center of the bow, and the rear half will follow into the mesh.

Attempting to chase the fish with the net fully submerged is a surrender of control needed to manage its capture. Excessive disturbance near the fish is assured to cause a forceful reaction as will careless contact with the net. Its instinct is to escape and, sadly, this is what usually happens when a trout is given the opportunity to break free.

No method of net application is guaranteed to result in a successful capture—-there are simply too many things that cannot be fully controlled. However, utilizing proper landing techniques will help to minimize crushing disappointment when complete victory over a special trout becomes the ultimate desire, and the moment of truth is at hand.

Baby names for fishing folk

Naming your child is an important job for a parent – not only do you have to choose something your baby can grow into, it’s important to put something of yourself into your choice too.

Like your love of fishing.

fishing baby Baby names for fishing folk

The perfect baby
Source: Naver Blog

So if you’re expecting, here are some suggestions to mull over next time you’re on the river bank, beach or pier. And why not? If you’re about to become a father or mother – it could be the last time in a long time that your fishing equipment gets an outing.

Sea names

sea Baby names for fishing folk

Plenty of sea inspired names out there
Source: Live Internet

If you’re a sea angler, you’re in for a treat because the briny blue has long been an inspiration for some of our most well loved names.

Boys

  • Dylan – ‘Son of the sea’, this Welsh name is much loved for it’s lyrical and literary connections.
  • Kai – Polynesian twist – it means ‘sea’.
  • Merlin – ‘Sea fortress’ another Welsh moniker and a strong name for a boy!
  • Morrissey – ‘Choice of the sea’ – also a maudlin old rocker.
  • Zale – ‘Sea strength’ from the Greek.

Girls

  • Maria – from Mary – could mean a number of things from ‘lady of the sea’, drop of the sea,’ and ‘Star of the sea’. But be warned, it also means ‘bitter’.
  • Muriel – Irish for ‘Sparkling sea’.
  • Morwenna – ‘maiden of the sea’ a lovely Welsh / Cornish name.
  • Coral – like the reef.
  • Ula – ‘Gem of the sea’.

Fresh water

fresh water Baby names for fishing folk

Fans of freshwater will have to think a little harder
Source: Elijah Prayed

For freshwater fanatics, the choices are a little less conventional in some cases – but there’s nothing wrong with exercising a little imagination.

Boys

  • River – a river. Better than calling a child ‘stream’ or ‘estuary’
  • Finn – means ‘fair’ in Irish, but a fin is part of a fish right?
  • Trent – It’s a river – and a boy’s name. Other rivers might also make good names – but maybe not ‘Thames’ or ‘Humber’.
  • Fry – a baby fish.
  • Elver – a baby eel.
  • Tad – a proper boy’s name, but also the first half of tadpole.
  • Pike – might give rise to ‘don’t tell ‘em your name…’ Dad’s Army jokes.
  • Irving - a nice one this – it’s Scottish in origin and means ‘green water’.

Girls

  • Tallulah – celtic and meaning ‘leaping water’.
  • Pearl – fresh or salt water.
  • Brooke – beware – if she turns out to be a chatterbox, she’ll be a ‘babbling Brooke’.
  • Isis – beware – her tears were believed to cause the yearly flooding of the Nile. Don’t call your child this if you live on the Somerset levels.
  • Lotus - pond plant
  • Lilly – also a pond plant

Best avoided

bigstock Closeup of a cute baby girl ma 48704051 Baby names for fishing folk

“You’ve called me WHAT?!”
Source: Nosnibor 137

  • Bob - Hmm.
  • Rod – a bit obvious don’t you think?
  • Annette – you might think its a ‘keeper’, but will she?
  • Marlow - it’s a glass half empty thing, the name means ‘drained lake’.
  • Marina – nice, but there are many berths in a marina. She won’t thank you for it.

If you know of any great fishing inspired baby names, please share them in the comments below.

Furry fishing gear

Fishing has been around for a very long time and of course in centuries past fishermen didn’t have all of today’s fantastic gear to feed their families.

Not such a big deal when they could rely on animals to assist. Here are a few of the fisherman’s best friends.

Cormorants

cormorant Furry fishing gear

Cormorant fishing has been around since 960 AD
Source: Animals and Society

For thousands of years fishermen in China have used trained cormorants to catch fish. The fisherman ties a snare around the bottom of the bird’s boat, which stops larger fish being swallowed, but the cormorant still gets a feed as smaller fishes slip through the snare. It’s a dying art, but one that has created some stunningly beautiful  images.

Otters

otter Furry fishing gear

Training these guys to fish is now illegal
Source: One More Generation

First developed in China and adopted by India and parts of Europe, otters were once used as a highly efficient means of catching fish. If otters were trained when they were young pups, they would become highly obedient and could be used to catch fish for well over a decade.

The otter would be kept on a long cord attached to it collar and be able to catch fish at a rapid rate. It was common in Sweden for a whole family to be supported by the fishing skills of one otter. The practice of training otters is now illegal due to poachers using them to steal salmon.

Dolphins

dolphins Furry fishing gear

Dolphins can act like sheepdogs for fishermen
Source: Wild Scotland

The Human Planet, BBC’s stunning nature series first highlighted the cooperation between fishermen and wild dolphins of Laguna in Brazil. The dolphins perform a role similar to a sheepdog in herding the shoals of mullet towards shallow water where the fishermen can cast their nets.

Remarkably the dolphins jump out of the water as a means of signalling to the fishermen the exact moment to cast nets and catch as many mullet as possible. The dolphins finish off any escapees.

Rodents

squirrel Furry fishing gear

We’re not a fan of this technique
Source: Pet Karia

Many of you may have heard of the Mongolian swimming mouse, which is the phrase given to a huge bundle of feathers used by fishermen to resemble a small rodent. This is due to bigger fish like the brown trout and taimen being partial to gulping down any small mammal that has the gall to swim overhead.

Taking this method to a darker extreme, fishermen have been known to attach a live squirrel to a hook and sweep it across the waterline to attract fish.

Dogs

Labrador Retriever Furry fishing gear

Man’s best friend, especially when he catches dinner
Source: Next Day Pets

The retrieving instincts of dogs have performed a useful role for fishermen for centuries. Certain breeds like Labrador retrievers and Portuguese water dogs were once commonly used to retrieve fish from the water and assist in bringing the nets back to shore. If the water is shallow enough, dogs can also actually catch fish too as seen recently with flood waters spilling into suburban areas.

Orangutans

orangutan Furry fishing gear

Check out this impressive technique
Source: Primatology

Although not a replacement for your fishing gear (as anything they catch goes down their hatch), orangutans do deserve a mention for their tool-assisted methods of catching fish.

Studies have shown that our closest living relatives watch catfish before using sticks to poke at the fish causing them to jump out of the water where they are caught by the orangutan. Unfortunately we weren’t able to interview the catfish.

World’s most expensive fish dishes

The UK doesn’t have the best cuisine in the world, but we certainly have an appetite for foody show offs.

Meaning our numerous celebrity chefs are always pushing the boundaries (or being stupid) with food. Cue the most expensive ready meal — a fish pie costing £314.

It’s creator Charlie Bigham admitted the pie was pricey, but said (pun-intended) “It is only a drop in the ocean for customers accustomed to the finer things of life”. Which leads us onto exploring what else these people might be eating — time to take a dive into the opulent ocean of seafood.

Bluefin Tuna

blue fin tuna Worlds most expensive fish dishes

Mysterious, rare and very expensive
Source: Ethical Nippon

Severely endangered, the rare and mysterious bluefin tuna is the holy grail of tuna fish. Its raw belly meat is highly prized for sushi and sashimi and its expensive too — very expensive.

One weighing 489lb recently sold for a record $1.76 million at a Tokyo auction, so that works out to $3599 per/lb. Shame it’s too large to be caught with your fishing gear else you’d become a big fish overnight.

Fish soup

The Buddha Jumps Over the Wall  Worlds most expensive fish dishes

Traditional ‘The Buddha Jumps Over the Wall’ soup
Source: Wikipedia Commons

There is nothing quite like tasty fish soup, but imagine how good it would taste if you’d paid £108 for a bowl. The Buddha Jumps Over the Wall is the name of the most expensive fish soup in the world and it can be purchased at Kai Mayfair in London.

It contains a wealth of ingredients including abalone, Japanese flower mushroom, sea cucumber and dried scallops. It also used to contain a shark’s fin (although this has been revised due to controversy). If you fancy trying it, you have to give 5 days notice.

Caviar

almas caviar Worlds most expensive fish dishes

The definition of luxury from the sea
Source: La Dolce Vitae

When it comes to the finer things in life, caviar is never far away. And the most expensive variety of them all is the highly prized Almas caviar from Iran.

The Caviar House & Prunier in Piccadilly is the only place in the world that sells it. It comes in a tin made of 24-carat gold and costs around £16,000.

Oysters

oysters Worlds most expensive fish dishes

A slightly more affordable tasty option for foodies
Source: Belly Pleasures

Not as expensive as other seafood, oysters are certainly the most decadent food from the sea and have always been considered a delicacy. Casanova allegedly ate 50 each day and Julius Caesar was rumoured to have invaded Britain in search of its oysters.

He should have headed to the Fal river estuary between Truro and Falmouth in Cornwall where some of the tastiest oysters in the world can be found. Today it’s a special area of conservation, so only boats powered by sail or oar are allowed. It’s also a public fishery, so if you have a licence you can try your luck hand-dredging for oysters.

Lobsters

lobster Worlds most expensive fish dishes

Notoriously pricey seafood nosh
Source: Angela Paige

Along with caviar, lobster has for many years been welcome on the dinner tables of the wealthy. Lobster is also the key ingredient in the world’s most expensive frittata.

Served at Norma’s restaurant in New York, the Zillion Dollar Lobster Frittata contains 1lb of lobster meat and 10 ounces of Sevruga caviar. It will set you back a cool $1000 if you mistake it for a fancy omelette (which it is).

Fish Curry

Samundari Khazana the World’s Most Expensive Curry – 3200 Worlds most expensive fish dishes

At a cool £2K, this curry includes gold coated lobster
Source: Cooking and Food

Fish curry is arguably India’s finest export after tea, but how much would you pay for a really good fish curry? Well, the most expensive in the world can be found in London (again) at the Bombay Brasserie.

The Samundari Khazana — translated as ‘seafood treasure’ — contains Devon crab, white truffle, Beluga caviar and a Scottish lobster coated in gold! £2000 is how much it will cost you to see that lobster.

Heston’s Sound of the Sea

hestons sound of the sea Worlds most expensive fish dishes

Intensify the taste with an iPod
Source: I Am Into This

Love him or hate him, Heston Blumenthal is certainly unique with his Willy Wonka approach to preparing food. So when he made his version of a fish pie it came served with an iPod. Hmm…

Yes the iPod provides the sound of crashing waves, which apparently intensifies the taste of the pie. Served in a wooden box, the pie appears to be covered in sand and seashells, but is of course completely edible.

Ingredients include tapioca, razor clams, crushed fried baby eels, cod liver oil and langoustine oil topped with abalone, shrimps and oysters and three kinds of edible seaweed. You’ll need the iPod back for when the waiter tells you how much you owe.

More about that ready meal

fish pie Worlds most expensive fish dishes

“It is only a drop in the ocean for customers accustomed to the finer things of life” – pie creator
Source: Trend Hunter

So back to the £315 ready meal. Well, you can order it online and it gets delivered to your house in an aluminium case (handcuffed to a security guard).

Inside you’ll find the usual suspects: Cornish lobster, turbot poached in Dom Perignon, white alba truffles, Beluga caviar and select oysters. Even the salt used is of the highest quality and sourced from Slovenia, so it’s really not the usual fish supper. Though some of us would still opt for a freshly caught fish supper wrapped in newspaper over all of the above.

Prehistoric fish still swimming today

Scientists recently discovered a fossilized fish face at the bottom of a Chinese reservoir that’s believed to be 419 million years old. Making it the oldest known creature with a face (after Mick Jagger).

Rather impressive you’ll agree.

However it’s not quite as impressive as the prehistoric fish that are still around and having it large today. That’s right, the deadly meteor, or whatever it was, didn’t quite wipe out everything. So keep an eye out for this lot next time you’re out with your fishing gear.

Goblin Shark

goblin shark Prehistoric fish still swimming today

Ridley Scott inspired nashers
Source: Environmental Graffiti

Anything named after a goblin is going to be a bit scary and the goblin shark doesn’t disappoint. Its translucent skin is a pinkish colour giving the shark a ghostly presence as it moves underwater.

Yet its weirdest feature is the set of teeth that are able to spring out of its mouth like some Ridley Scott sci-fi creation. The good news is that it swims at depths of over 4000 feet, so rarely comes into contact with human beings.

Hagfish

hagfish Prehistoric fish still swimming today

The hagfish eats it’s victims inside out
Source: Helablog

There is something about the name, hagfish, that suggests this could be a fictional creature. And many wished this were the case when they learn of the gruesome feeding and defence mechanisms of this fish.

Also known as slime eels, hagfish produce large amounts of slime which turns into sticky goo when mixed with water and this can choke potential predators. When it comes to eating, hagfish attach themselves to their prey like a leech and gorge on their victims from the inside out. There’s 500 million years worth of bad manners for you.

Alligator gar

Alligator Gar Prehistoric fish still swimming today

Now that’s a serious jaw!
Source: National Geographic Channel

Boasting a double-jawed arsenal of sharp teeth, thick-scaled armour and weighing in at up to 200 kilograms, the alligator gar hasn’t survived since the Cretaceous period because it looks pretty and barters well.

It’s a formidable predator and the largest freshwater fish in North America. Quite an achievement when you consider some of the big fish found around those parts.

Sturgeon

Sturgeon Prehistoric fish still swimming today

A major source of caviar
Source: Wikimedia

The magnificent sturgeon is a survivor from the early Jurassic period, which is about 190 million years ago. With 25 known species (the biggest growing up to an incredible 6 metres) sturgeons are protected with bony plates called scutes, and bottom feed in both freshwater and at sea.

These fish pose no real danger except when they decide to leap out of the water and land on something, which usually gets crushed by their weight. Unfortunately for the sturgeon, it’s the main source for caviar, so it’s done well to survive alongside human beings for so long.

Coelacanth

Coelacanth Prehistoric fish still swimming today

Coelacanth – nicknamed The Living Fossil
Source: The University of Chicago

Nicknamed the Living Fossil, as it was once considered extinct before popping up again in 1938, the coelacanth is perhaps the most famous of all living prehistoric fish. Its discovery in a fishing net in South Africa caused a worldwide sensation on par with finding a living dinosaur.

Growing up to 2 metres long, these large predators are found in deep, dark waters and feed on smaller fish, including sharks. They have very complex fin movements and almost appear to be running. No surprise then, that they’re considered by some to be the missing link between fish and amphibians.

Lancetfish

Lancetfishjpg Prehistoric fish still swimming today

A pesky nuisance to the fishing industry
Source: Fish Bio

With its abnormally large dorsal fin, which resembles a dinosaur sail, the lancetfish certainly looks prehistoric and its proper name – Alepisaurus Ferox – reinforces this as a fish with history.

Around since the Mesozoic era, this predator has a long streamlined body similar to a barracuda and six very sharp fang-like teeth. It is often caught by commercial fishermen by mistake and is regarded in this trade as being a nuisance.

Frilled Shark

frilled shark Prehistoric fish still swimming today

Eats it’s prey like a snake
Source: It’s Nature

This one is a real beauty and one of the most primitive sharks alive being from the Cretaceous period, but is rarely seen in the wild due to dwelling in deep waters where it feeds on squid.

One of the most unusual looking creatures on the planet, the frilled shark has surely inspired many sea monster myths with its almost alien appearance. Its mouth has an incredible 25 rows of razor sharp hooked teeth (that’s 300 teeth in total) and it can extend its jaws to feed on prey almost half its size. It then digests them quite similar to how a snake does.

Frightening foreign fish in the UK

For all the gripes about the cold, wet weather here in the UK, at least the British don’t have to deal with the dangerous animals, insects and fish found in hotter climates.

Err … actually the fish part needs revising.

With recent news reports revealing the Amazon pacu fish (also known as the Ball Cutter for painfully literal reasons) has been discovered in European waters, we’ve cast the net to keep tabs on how close the frightening fish are getting to the UK.

Pacu fish

pacu fish Frightening foreign fish in the UK

And the fish with the freakiest teeth award goes to…
Source: Animal Planet

We’ll start with the big news. Commonly found in the Amazon, the pacu fish, infamously nicknamed the Ball Cutter, has reportedly caused South American fishermen to bleed to death by biting off their testicles. Ouch.

The bad news is that there have been sightings this year in the River Seine in Paris and also the Øresund channel between Denmark and Sweden, which has prompted warnings for men to keep their trunks on if swimming. If that isn’t enough to freak you out, take a look at those strangely familiar teeth. Nothing a good fisherman with some quality fishing gear can’t handle.

Great white shark

great white shark Frightening foreign fish in the UK

Perpetually frightening thanks to Spielberg
Source: Regal Diving

National newspapers have this year reported sightings of a great white shark, which was spotted by experienced fishermen off the coast of Cornwall. Now experienced fishermen should know their mackerels from their muscles, so surely they know a great white shark when they see one.

What we can be sure about is that the great white shark is feared by millions of people especially after Spielberg’s terrifying movie Jaws. With its razor-sharp teeth, stealth, speed and power, the great white is the ultimate marine killing machine. Let’s hope it keeps its distance.

Moray Eel

Moray eel Frightening foreign fish in the UK

Sharp, bacteria coated teeth and a locking jaw – avoid at all costs
Source: National Aquarium

Found lurking mainly in dark crevices in sub-tropical and tropical seas, the moray eel’s razor-sharp teeth coupled with its strong, locking jaws will inflict severe injuries on humans if they get too close.

The bacteria which coats its teeth can also cause infection, so all things considered, moray eels are best avoided, which means don’t go poking fingers down dark holes when diving abroad.

Oh by the way — a 4ft-long moray was caught in the UK in 2009, so they do occasionally stray.

Weever Fish

weever fish Frightening foreign fish in the UK

Now you see it, now you don’t
Source: Sup Boarder

This small fish isn’t so frightening to look at and is becoming quite common in UK waters. However it will give you a nasty shock if you happen to stand on it, which is much easier to achieve than you might think.

This well camouflaged fish has sharp venomous spines spaced along its dorsal fins, which stick up out of the sand and can spear unsuspecting bathers and surfers. The venom injected into the soles of feet is a nerve poison, which generally causes excruciating pain in the victim.

Stingray

stingray1 Frightening foreign fish in the UK

Peaceful by nature, deadly if cornered
Source: Buried Adventures

The common stingray is found in UK waters and is a fairly placid and beautiful relation to the shark. Its first line of defence is to flee; however, if the stingray is cornered, then it has a brutal alternative to escaping.

Concealed in the stingray’s tail is a long serrated, venomous stinger, which carries a protein-based venom. This weapon can cause fatal injuries especially if it snaps off inside its victim. In 2006, the shock death of wildlife expert, Steve Irwin warned the world about the dangers of stingrays.

Snakehead fish

snakehead fish Frightening foreign fish in the UK

If a snake and a fish mated…
Source: Like Fishing

The snakehead fish is commonly found in warmer seas, but in 2008 an angler hooked one of these in an East Midland’s river, which came as quite a shock to wildlife experts, who suggest it was abandoned by somebody.

The snakehead fish originated over 50 million years ago and has evolved with all the raw brutality needed to survive crueler times. It owns a large mouth lined with sharp teeth and will devour just about anything in or around water. It breathes atmospheric air too, so it can survive on land long enough for it to crawl from pond to pool wreaking havoc on the native species.

Tiger Fish

tiger fish Frightening foreign fish in the UK

Just as ferocious as the name implies
Source: Fishing in Gambia

The tiger fish (or goliath fish as it also known) is as ferocious as it looks. It’s renowned for being a highly destructive predator able to take on prey much bigger than itself and boasts all the nasty tools required for a proper job.

Exceptionally strong, fast and well armoured, the tiger fish owns powerful jaw muscles and those frightening teeth mesh together just like a piranhas for maximum mess factor. The good news is that it’s only found in freshwater in Africa. We just thought we’d throw it in the pool to show you how lucky you are living in the UK.

Airflo Sponsors FlyCastaway!

The FlyCastaway boys testing their new fly fishing equipment!

The FlyCastaway boys have been lucky enough to produce some of the best saltwater fly fishing footage available anywhere on the internet! Chasing some amazing Tarpon and tussling with large Bonefish and, almost everything else that will take a fly! They’ve also just produced the above promotional video highlighting their new sponsors, Airflo, G.Loomis and Smith Action Optics!

These boys fish for some extreme fish and their fishing tackle needs to cope with immense amounts of pressure. When a Tarpon hits the fly and you set the hook, you need to know that the leader, fly line or rod isn’t going to break when you initiate the strike… The G.Loomis fly rods paired with our Airflo saltwater fly lines give the best casting and fish playing ability on the market today, that’s why these boys choose to use our fishing gear!

Fishtec TV Fishing tackle reviews and tips!

Fishtec TV Fishtec TV Fishing tackle reviews and tips!Fishtec TV is a new an exciting innovation that helps you choose the right fishing equipment and give specialist hints and tips from our resident experts, all to improve your fishing experience! Our team has put together a wide selection of fishing videos from tackle reviews (old and new) including great tips to get more fish on the bank. These fishing videos will help you make an informed decision on all your fishing tackle purchases.

Our fishing tips section gives you the opportunity to explore all aspects of fishing with everything from tying knots to landing your catch, for each and every discipline! With hints and tips from our resident fishing experts such as Alan Yates, Dave Lane and not forgetting previous World Fly Fishing Champion, Iain Barr for everything fly fishing. Your landing net won’t be left dry if you follow these specialist fishing tips!

The fishing tackle reviews section has been designed to help you make your own, informed decision on what fishing equipment you should be using or may need to purchase. With detailed overviews of almost every fishing tackle brand there is, TF Gear, Greys, Airflo, Nash, Chub and many more, you can review the lot and choose which tackle item is best for you. A great way of knowing exactly what your getting, with expert anglers giving their professional opinion on each piece of tackle.

You can find Fishtec TV on the Fishtec website and on YouTube!

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