Category Archives: Coarse Fishing

Anglers have fished for coarse fish in the UK for centuries, evolving and adapting to fishing situations by altering their fishing tackle and approach. Even the most experienced anglers sometimes need a helping hand from time to time, read more below for useful hints & tips, fishing articles and coarse fishing tackle updates.

Barbel Fishing On The River Wye

The eagerly awaited coarse river fishing season began on 16th June, and several members of the Fishtec team were itching to get out there and fish for barbel on the famous River Wye, one of the best mixed game and coarse fisheries in the whole of the UK. Read on to find out how the guys did on England’s finest coarse fishing waterway, and what methods and tackle they employed.

The majestic river Wye

The majestic river Wye.

Many of the popular beats on the river were booked solid post June the 16th, but with the help of the informative and friendly people at the Wye and Usk foundation we managed to book a lovely stretch of the famous river Wye for the day, just a few miles upriver from Hereford during the second week of the new coarse fishing season.

Making a booking with the Wye and Usk foundation is a piece of cake- simply visit their website, select the beat and date you wish to fish and make payment by card online. Beat availability and recent catch reports are all very clearly shown on the website. Alternatively give the guys a call- they will be more than happy to give you advise on which beats are fishing well and swim availability. The beauty of these beats unlike some of the cheaper day ticket venues the fishing pressure itself is very light, and you either get the beat completely to yourself or share with just a handful of rods.

In our case the chosen beat was the lower canon bridge near Madely, which takes up to 4 rods – plenty of room as the stretch is over a mile long. Cannon bridge is in the beautiful rural Herefordshire countryside, situated on the opposite bank of the beautiful wear garden national trust property and was just a 40 minute drive from our Brecon HQ. A sumptuous good looking stretch of river to say the least.

The canon bridge stretch of the river Wye.

The canon bridge stretch of the river Wye.

Our plan was to take a half day off work, with fishing continuing into the late summer evening, with some of the other guys turning up after their shift in the Fishtec warehouse. Myself and marketing director Tim Hughes were the lucky ones with the afternoon off. We headed off to the river at lunch time and arrived at the bank approximately 2.30pm.

This beat is one of the longest walks to the fishing area on the Wye and Usk programme, being about 1/2 a mile stroll through a farm track and fields; so our intention was to seriously reduce the fishing tackle and travel very light to counteract the long walk. Despite this, after the trek to the river on what was one of the hottest days of the year in very humid conditions, we reached the river feeling a little hot and bothered. I was very grateful that I was wearing my breathable fishing waders, rather than the traditional neoprene or rubber types, an essential bit of fishing gear in my opinion for the warmer summer days.

The perfect barbel swim.

The perfect barbel swim.

After a quick scout up and down the banks we found two absolutely perfect swims – Tim’s at the head of a pool, where thick weed beds and a good flow faded into a deep area on a bend, and mine on the main pool itself, just 30 yards below him with a nice drop off on my side and partially submerged branches to my left side for fish cover. A bit of careful marginal wading would allow me to place a perfect cast onto where the bottom faded out of view. Initial observations indicated a lot of fish present – gold flashes in the depths and the odd fish topping and crashing about were quite evident in the swims.

The TF Gear Airlite reel - a great reel for barbel fishing in the 40 size.

The TF Gear Airlite reel – a great reel for barbel fishing in the 40 size.

Now for the fishing tackle– as I mentioned we had traveled very light, with just one rod (a beat rule) a long bank stick, and a small carryall with all of the terminal end gear and baits, plus a net with shoulder strap with unhooking mat wrapped round the handle. No chairs or any cumbersome gear were brought along whatsoever.

My fishing rod choice was the great value TF Gear banshee barbel, fitted with a 1.5 test curve avon top, matching Airlite reel  with 12lb TF Gear nantec mono mainline. On the business end was an 18 inch fluorocarbon hooklink made up of 10lb Airflo Sightfree G3, 23 gram guru cage feeder and size 10 QMI hook with 2 x robin red 8mm pre-drilled pellets hair rigged into place. I had a small tub of halibut groundbait mixed up with some pellets, some of which we had sparingly thrown or catapulted into the swims before setting up the rod’s on the bank sticks. We took some time to walk the banks to check out further suitable swims and feed in a sparing amount of bait into the most likely looking spots.

Tim catapulting some pellets into a swim.

Tim catapulting some halibut pellets into a swim.

I made my first cast at just 5 yards out – never ignore the water close to you if it looks good, fish this first rather than blasting out to the far bank. I settled back quietly and moved slightly up the bank away from the rod, eagerly awaiting a bite.  I had angled the rod as high up as possible on the bank stick, so to avoid any untoward influence from the current. Within just minutes the rod tip jagged a few times, then pulled right over with a solid take. I reeled down and felt a thumping, kiting, head-shaking weight at the end of it. This must be a barbel I thought! And indeed it was. I gave Tim a shout and after a dogged, very spirited fight we had the first barbel on the bank – these beautiful fish sure know how to hang on!

The first barbel graces the bank.

The first barbel graces the bank.

After a quick snap I took great care to rest the barbel in the net before release; it is important to do this because barbel give their all during the fight, in the summer time dissolved oxygen levels are much lower in the water so the fish may become very tired and stressed. This ensures the barbel can swim off strongly without keeling over from exhaustion later, when back in the river fighting against the flow.

Back she goes - take care to rest barbel in the net first.

Back she goes – take care to rest barbel in the net first.

Tim Hughes into a hard fighting Wye barbel.

Tim Hughes into a hard fighting Wye barbel.

The action continued for the next couple of hours for both of us – with many thumping rod wrenching takes all round, we both landed and lost several nice barbel each. At one stage the bites were frantic – it was literally every cast, and just minutes after the feeder hit the river bed in some instances. This was great fishing -what you might call a red letter day!

A golden Wye barbel, great looking fish.

A golden Wye barbel, great looking fish.

A hard fighting golden Wye barbel

Another hard fighting river Wye golden torpedo.

As well as some cracking barbel we also had some super chub, most in the 3 -4 lb bracket. Now these chub fought in a much more sneakier fashion than the barbel- what they lacked in dogged long distance stamina they made up for by heading right into every bolt hole and snag they could find, and they definitely knew them all.

A wiley river Wye chub

Some fine river Wye chub.

Some fine river Wye chub.

Fishtec’s Warehouse manger Mike Morgan showed up at around 6.00pm, and took up a promising position on a gravel bar at the very tail end of the pool. Mike made some risky long range casts close to the farthest bank into some weed bed slots- a spot where Tim has catapulted some pellets into earlier.  This strategy paid off for Mike with three hard fighting barbel being his reward.

Mike Morgan with his third Wye barbel.

Mike Morgan with his third Wye barbel.

The barbel just loved hoovering up robin red carp pellets.

The barbel just loved hoovering up robin red carp pellets.

The bites in my swim had finally slowed down as evening drew on, up until now the fishing had been so good there had been no need to move swims. If the bites dry up then don’t be afraid to make a move! So I took a walk and baited up a few likely looking spots first, then  switched swims to a few hundred yards further downstream and cast my feeder rig into a perfect looking area just opposite an old boathouse-  depth, flow and cover all combined together in this area to make a sweet looking spot.

A nice Wye chub to end the day.

A nice Wye chub to end the day.

Four decent chub came to the net in quick succession, but with absolutely no sign of any barbel in this area.  The clock had finally ticked down on us – doesn’t time fly when your catching fish? So we called it a day with a dozen barbel and eight chub landed between us, plus numerous other chances and fish lost. A productive and fun afternoons fishing on this majestic river to say the least.

 

Fishing Luggage Explained

We get asked quite regularly about the various types of fishing tackle luggage we sell. There seems to be a lot of confusion about the key differences in the various products. Perhaps the most commonly asked question is what are the differences between a quiver, holdall, a sleeve and a carryall? Take a read to find out more!

Korum 3 rod quivers

Korum 3 rod quivers

A quiver is an open ended item of luggage. Therefore they can accommodate any length of rod – the sections stick out of the top.  Most quivers are around 3 to 4 foot long. The way these work are the fishing rods are clipped into place onto the outside of the quiver. The rods are exposed and can be either kept made up or unmade. There is a central pocket inside most quivers, and usually side pockets to accommodate shelters, bank sticks,  pods and so on. Quivers are very lightweight so are ideal for carrying long distances – for example when river roving or if its a long walk to your chosen swim. They are also great if you carry made up rods and want to set up quickly. The down side is they offer very little protection for your rod and reels in transit.

A 6 rod TF Gear hardcore quiver opened up

An open 6 rod capacity TF Gear hardcore holdall

A holdall is an item of luggage that carries complete made up rods, fully enclosed and zipped up inside padded internal compartments. These often take between 3 – 6 rods, as well as extra tackle items such as banksticks and landing nets. Most holdalls are 6 foot long to accommodate 2 section carp rods, although in some cases they can be shorter, i.e for the TF Gear compact fishing rod range. They provide outstanding protection for your fishing tackle due to their padded and robust nature, and are perfect to leave your tackle in storage long term. The downside is they are heavy and cumbersome to move around.

A single Korum rod sleeve

A single Korum rod sleeve

Sleeves are basically an extremely slimmed down version of a rod holdall – designed to take just one rod with a reel fitted. They make a inexpensive way to purchase protection for rods, and come in handy for short sessions with less fishing tackle than normal. Some manufactures combine quivers with sleeves, to make a modular system such as the TF Gear hardcore quiver and sleeves.

A typical fishing carryall bag

A typical fishing carryall bag

Carryalls are your traditional fishing bags. They tend to be square or oblong in shape, with sizes varying from a quick day session size to accommodating everything for a full week – and the kitchen sink to boot! Many of them combine other features, so you can use them as a bivvy table, or have removable drop in cool bags and reel storage pouches.

 

TF Gear Compact Rods

Dave-Lane Carp Fishing

Looking for a new rod to kick start your spring campaign? Look no further than the TF gear compact range of coarse fishing rods, ideal for those starting out in the sport and the seasoned veteran alike.

What are the compact rods you ask? Well the concept is these coarse fishing rods are shorter in length than the traditional fishing rods on the market. This confers many advantages to the fisherman.

  • Easy maneuvering – in tightly spaced commercial fishery swims, or on the river bank when you have to clamber through heavy bank side foliage.
  • Greatly reduced weight – These fishing rods are also significantly lighter in the hand making your fishing more pleasurable.
  • Easy transportation – these rods are guaranteed to fit in your car!
  • Better casting accuracy – with less leverage to deal with and a quicker recovery time accurate casting becomes much easier.
  • Improved control when playing a fish – its much easier to put the pressure on a decent fish and change angle of play quickly with a shorter rod.
  • Reduced cost – shorter length equals less carbon used. This cost saving has been passed on, so higher quality blanks and components are used in manufacture. You get a better quality product for less money.
  • Fish playing fun – feel everything, and put the thrill back into a fight! While at the same time there is enough power to quickly tame large specimen fish.

TF Gear produce a compact rod for every fishing scenario you will ever encounter. There are two ranges – The original compact rods, which and have a classic brown ground matt carbon finish, and feature smooth mid-tip progressive actions. These rods are great value, but no compromise has been made on quality or finish.  Secondly the lighter weight and higher modulus carbon nantec range, which feature slimmer blanks and a slightly faster action. In addition most of the nantec rods come with a free TF gear Airlite reel, making them an incredibly competitive package.

The TF Gear nantec compact allrounder

The TF gear compact allrounders must be the best seller best in the range. These highly versatile rods offer you numerous options, you can go from a 8 to 10 foot length with a two foot extension piece. They are also supplied with 3 x push in feeder quiver tips and an avon top, allowing you to fish multiple methods – float, feeder, touch ledgering, surface fishing or even spinning.

The TF Gear compact commercial feeder rod

 

The TF Gear Compact commercial float and feeder rods are available in either 8 foot or 10 foot configurations. The feeder rods come complete with 3 push in quivers. They are ideal for small fishery work, from roach and rudd to tench and bream, these rods handle them all. The 8 footers in particular are ideal for really crowded swims, and also make superb rods for youngsters to easily use.

TF Gear Compact carp rods are 10 foot in length with a 2.5 test curve. These fantastic rods are not just ideal for carp, they can be used for barbel, large specimen tench, chub or even pike and zander fishing using a float and deadbait presentation.

Alex Bones, expert carp and match angler talk us through the nantec compact carp rod.

Top 10 Tips for successful river Pike Fishing

River caught Pike

25lb plus wild river pike

Catching a prime specimen Pike from a river can look like a daunting prospect at first glance…  However they are a relatively easy fish to catch, once you know how ! Read on for my top 10 tips on how to land yourself one of these magnificent wild predators before the coarse fishing river season ends in the next few weeks!

1. Travel light and keep your fishing tackle to a minimum. Be prepared to walk long distances – the biggest specimens won’t be in the car park swim! Waterproof breathable fishing clothing and waders are essential, and also a quiver system or fishing rucksack to carry your fishing gear effectively. Don’t bother taking a chair or a day shelter,  just use the bank to sit on!

2. Move swims every 20 minutes – if you don’t have a run within that time then there are either no fish there, or if they are they are simply not feeding in that area. The more water you can cover the greater your chances will be.

3. Tread carefully and quietly when approaching a swim– the pike are very often under your feet in the margins, and can spook easily. Many large pike have been caught just an arms length out from the bank.

4. Use fresh bait from the fishmonger’s counter – e.g herring, sprats or sardines. They smell much better and emit more oil.  Another benefit is the low cost. They are soft for casting purposes, but you won’t be casting them out far – Use sea fishing bait elastic to keep your deadbait on the hooks.

5. When roving there is a lot of physical activity, so breathable waders are a real benefit.  They stop moisture build up which in turn keeps you warm and dry. Breathable chest waders also help if you need to scramble down into the water to net a fish or retrieve your rig from that inevitable snag up !

6. Experiment with added oils and attractants – one of my favourite ploys is to add a cod liver-oil pill (the clear jelly-type ones sold by health food shops) on to the bend of one of the trebles. It leaves a tasty little slick for the pike to home in on.

7. Don’t be put off by colour in the water, or if the river is in partial flood. These conditions often push fish into slack marginal areas and actually make them easier to find.
A full bank bursting spate with trees drifting past on the other hand is a no go!

8. Set your float over depth by about a foot, and use a very long bank stick to keep your mainline up off the surface. This helps reduce drag from the current, and stops debris from building up on your line and giving false bites.

9. Once your float starts to bob under, or  starts moving steadily across the surface set the hooks! Only little jacks tend to fall off from striking too soon…. Big pike are pretty wised up and often drop the bait when they feel resistance. It also makes unhooking a much easier task.

10. Keep your best spots secret! Pike are vulnerable to heavy fishing pressure, so once you land your dream pike and get a picture keep the exact location to yourself and close fishing buddies only, or you might find your future sport declines.

River pike float fishing

Waiting for the float to disappear

The Water Wolf Camera – Now in Stock at Fishtec!

The Water Wolf Under Water Camera now in Stock at Fishtec

The product we have all been waiting for! The Water Wolf Underwater Camera is now in stock here at Fishtec! But, make sure you’re quick to get these by Christmas, as many of these have already been snapped up over the weekend!

Believe it or not, the Water Wolf actually started off as a hobby, a small project among a group of dedicated anglers who wanted to know more about the happenings beneath the surface and how fish react to their lures and baits, as well as what they could see above the surface. All members of the water wolf ‘gang’ share a common love for fishing, engineering, cameras and gadgets.

After trying to get results with the existing cameras on the market, they all came to the same conclusion that the only way they’d succeed in getting the recordings they wanted was to actually build their own camera. They wanted a totally waterproof, easy to operate camera capable of capturing high quality, underwater stills and video, all of this with long battery life and a discrete presence in the water. The Water Wolf was born.

See how the Water Wolf works here.

The Water Wolf Camera is specially designed underwater fishing camera. 100% waterproof so you can film underwater in depths down to 100m. Shockproof to withstand the hardest casts, you can use this camera with confidence in any conditions.

Four hours recording when fully charged, the Water Wolf records incredible quality images and is perfect in any fishing environment. Easy to use, totally stable when moving through the water and supplied with three different add on weights to give different sink rates and filming angles. Supplied with add-on float to film in any bait fishing situation and its own EVA carry strap to mount the camera in numerous ways.

What’s in the box?

Water Wolf Camera - What's in the box

1. Water Wolf UW1.0 Underwater Camera
2. Stainless Steel Boom
3. EVA Float
4. Neoprene Pouch
5. Brass Weights (3 pcs)
6. USB Charging Cable

The Water Wolf HD camera is mounted to your line with a stainless steel boom (2), and it’s sink rate and angle can be adjusted using the three interchangeable brass weights (5) supplied. The camera operation couldn’t be more simple – On or Off – Zero technical jargon to get confused with and the internal battery which can be re-charged via the USB charging Cable (6) will last for around four hours, plenty long enough to fill a 16gb Micro SD Card (recommended) with high quality 720p 30fps fishing action!

Use the camera for casting, trolling, lure fishing or static bait fishing with or without the attachable EVA Float (3).

Water Wolf Camera HD Technical

Much of our current stock here at Fishtec has already been snapped up by anglers looking to get the best underwater footage, with many Sea anglers and Carp Fishermen looking to add the Water Wolf Camera to their coarse fishing tackle.

And with much of the footage we’ve seen online, who wouldn’t want one! It really is this easy to use:

Arriving at Fishtec –  Just in time for Christmas! – These Water Wolf Underwater Cameras are forecast to sell extremely well, and priced at just £119.99, we’ve seen many Water Wolfs posted to their new owners already.

Also available for the Water Wolf HD Camera is the Accessories Pack, which can be purchased at the same time as ordering the camera on the Fishtec Website, featuring some useful mounts to suit almost any recording situation you’ve come across, enabling you to attach your new Water Wolf Camera to a boat hull, railings, windows, tripods, plus in the new year a special Carp Fishing Accessories pack will be available too. Ideal for all types of fishing.

What’s in the Water Wolf Accessories Pack?waterwolfaccessories

1. Locking plug
2. Camera holder
3. Tripod adapter
4. Ball joint
5. Railing/pole mount
6. Suction cup mount
7. Ball joint adhesive mount

As with any new product, we’ve had a lot of questions from interested customers, the most being the customer worried that they may lose the camera in a snag. But, with any fishing, you should always use a lighter hook length than mainline, allowing you to break your hook off, releasing the camera.

Having your fishing reels loaded with heavier line, preferably braid, will also help if you need to pull the camera free from weed and protect you from break offs when casting. Double check all of your knots and connections BEFORE you start fishing.

The Water Wolf Camera weighs just 66g on its own before adding the brass weights so be sure to use a fishing rod that can handle the casting weight of your lure PLUS the camera to get the best cast possible and to avoid rod breakages.

Taking these steps will drastically reduce the chance of you losing your camera and if you are still worried, refrain from casting it near know snags and other dangerous situations. With everything in life there is a little risk involved but we reckon the very best videos will come from the anglers with sense of adventure! If you are concerned about losing the Water Wolf then maybe this gadget isn’t for you.

Water Wolf Underwater Camera FAQ

Q: How do I open the camera?
A: Wiggle the plug back and forth, you can then put your nail in the gap and open it. This takes a couple of times to master, but then it is easy.
You can also tie a knot in a piece of string, put it through the small hole in the plug and gently pull, until it opens.

Q: How do I close the camera?
A: Push the plug in with a turning motion. Turning the plug makes sure the o-rings are absolutely tight. This is very important when fishing deep. 

Q: Does the camera float or sink?
A: The camera floats. If the 6 gram weight is inserted, it still floats. If the 9 or 12 gram weight is inserted, it sinks.

Q: Will the housing scratch? 
A: The housing and lens is made from polycarbonate, the same material used for riot shields, so it is very though. It can be scratched, but this will not affect the function or waterproofness, only the outlook.

Q: How do I clean the camera?
A: Rinse it in lukewarm water, and dry it off with a soft cloth.

Q: How do I store/transport the camera?
A: When you are done recording, put the camera in the neoprene pouch, and secure the Velcro to close it.

Q: Why does the camera wobble at high speeds?
A: The UW 1.0 comes with three weights (6g, 9g and 12g) the 12g weight makes the camera stable in the water to about 5 knots, at higher speeds it starts to wobble.
How can I avoid that the camera tangles on the cast? Tie the line to the eye in the stick, do not use snaps or swivels. 

Q: How far should the lure be from the camera? 
A: The clearer the water is, the further away the lure can be. 40-80 cm is a good starting point.

Q: How can I tell if the water is clear enough for filming? 
A: If you can see 1 meter down into the water you should be able to record. The deeper your camera goes the clearer water you will need, in order to get enough light.

Q: How deep can I record video?
A: If the water is very clear, there is lots of light, and the sun is high in the sky you can record video at 50-100 meters. 

Q: Why is my video green?
A: Light has different wavelengths, because of this color disappears the deeper you record. Red color disappears around 5 meters, orange around 8 meters, yellow around 15 meters. This is why the recording ends up green.

Q: How can I tell if the camera is charged?
A: Connect the charger cable to the camera, and a power source. When the blue diode turns off, the camera is fully charged.

Q: Can I cast the camera?
A: Yes, the camera is shockproof, but casts longer than 40 meters may damage the camera.

Q: How far can I cast the camera?
A: 40 meters, casts longer than that may damage the camera

Q: What happens if the line snaps?
A: That depends on the setup. If the camera is setup to sink, it is most likely lost. If it floats it might surface.

Q: Can I order spare parts?
A: Please contact your local Water Wolf dealer.

Q: What micro SD card should I buy?
A: 16 or 32 GB. micro SD or SDHC card. 16 GB. will give you around 4 hours recording time, 32 GB. up to almost 5 hours, depending on water temperature.

Q: How deep does the camera go?
A: The camera is waterproof to 100 meters, if the camera is closed correctly.

Q: Can I use the camera as a web camera?
A: No.

Q: Can I film while charging the camera?
A:  No.

Q: Can I use the camera for ice fishing?
A: Yes.

Q: Does the camera record sound?
A: Yes, but through a small hole over the on/off button, so when the camera is closed you barely get any sound.

When you’re home from your first fishing trip with your Water Wolf Camera, the fun really starts! To make things easier for you, the team at Water Wolf have produced a short video showing how to download and edit your video – It’s extremely easy, and we’re looking forward to see your fishing footage! Don’t forget to upload a video to our Facebook Page, or Tag ‘Fishtec Fly’ in your video!

For more information visit www.WaterWolfHD.com!

2015 TF Gear Babes Calendar

2015 tfgear babes calendar blog

It’s back! The ever impressive TF Gear Babes calendar has arrived at our warehouse and is ready for sale, along with a dozen beautiful images of our favourite babes, and carp of course!

It’s just 9 weeks until Christmas and many have started their shopping already, but what do you buy an angler who already has all the carp fishing tackle under the sun?

The 2015 TF Gear Babes calendar is the ideal stocking filler to spruce up an office, garage or fishing tackle room, with a beautiful babe holding Common and Mirror carp for every month of the year!

Price: Just £9.99!

Click here to purchase the TF Gear Babes Calendar!

2015 TF Gear Babes Calendar

The TF Gear 60” Brolly

I have written of the TF Gear Poncho, explaining the total-protection nature of its material and design. Now I feel compelled to shout about the TF Gear 60” Brolly having sheltered under my own for more than a few nights this year.

Our weather has, generally, been good for some time – although August was like a mini-winter! Up until that month, and certainly since, the climate has been kind to those of us who willingly shun our beds in favour of a sleeping bag by the river. Fortunately, I have had no need to employ the over-wrap: my nights under the stars have merely been long and damp. I cannot then, in all honesty, sing the praises of the 60” Brolly’s stability or rain-repulsion qualities, though it is clear to anyone who has erected and used this superb refuge that those criteria would be well served.

For me, the TF Gear 60” Brolly provided a roomy yet cosy sanctuary from the damp and the night generally; there was sufficient room for the largest bed-chair (though I chose to sleep on the ground-sheet) and loads of space for one man’s gear, (personally, I prefer to use a brolly over a fishing bivvy because they are easier to transport) but even with active cooking-gear, this brolly would have accommodated and shielded a stove from all but the most awkward, ‘straight-in’ winds – largely thanks to the amply-proportioned wings at either side of the brolly entrance. With the wings (or side-flaps if you prefer!) level to the ground I initially perceived the entrance to be too low, but this was an illusion brought about, I believe, by a lifetime with brollies of standard size.

On entering my ‘cave’ I found little need to bend more than was necessary to effect a stoop – loadsa room! And as for stability, the six good quality pegs and two storm-rods made it patently clear that the TF Gear 60” Brolly would be going nowhere if a gale blew up – it hugged the ground like a limpet! With no centre-pole and an abbreviated rib-boss my 60” Brolly experience was a good one, and I can easily imagine the sheer luxury within once the weather really turns and forces me to use the over-wrap – bring it on!!

TF Gear DVD Big Carp Tactics with Dave Lane

Join Dave Lane on the banks of one of the most famous carp lakes in history, the prestigious Yateley Pads lake. Dave attempts to lure the elusive Pad lakes monsters, learn how to successfully target the largest carp in the lake on methods which are no so widely used. Joined by Total Carp editor Marc Coulson who gives a master class in chod rig fishing and shows you everything you need to know about this devastating presentation.

Get an exclusive first look at the exciting new carp fishing tackle Dave has been developing for TF Gear over the past 12 months. Highlights include Laney’s new long distance carp rods and watch in amazement as he erects his new Force 8 Shelter, the fastest shelter in the world, in under 10 seconds.

He reveals the new Hardcore Brolly System with its unrivalled luxury, versatility and stability – this is surely the ultimate all season brolly system. Including many other TF Gear products which are all available from Fishtec.

Look out for part two, three and four over the next week.

 

TF Gear Chill Out Onesie

The TF Gear Onesie is a hooded, one-piece, fleece suit that will truly keep the keenest deep winter carp specialist wrapped in a thermal second skin all day and all night.

You may ask yourself is it OK to wear a onesie? But for those anglers who spend nights on end in a cold fishing bivvy waiting for that one bite, you may want to think again and get one for yourself.

tfg-chillout-onesie

Field testing of the TF Gear Chill Out Onesie illustrated its outstanding insulating properties and incredible comfort, our testers have endured the coldest weather with ease. With no belts, buckles, gaps or joins the wearer enjoys complete freedom of movement and draft-free, whole body warmth. The TF Gear Onesie is an utterly superb sleep-suit, the perfect mid layer and a rather trendy outer garment.

Don’t deprive yourself of the best piece of winterwear you could wish for – invest in a TF Gear Onesie.

Available in sizes Medium through to XXL 

 

Dave Lane New Years Carp Fishing Video Diary

What could be better than fishing your way into the new year? Follow Dave Lane in his first carp fishing video diary of 2014! In the two part diary, Dave describes (again) the advantages of moving pegs when things aren’t really going your way.

There’s some great tips in both of these carp diaries, including how to  choose the correct carp setup and also how to detect if the fish are high in the water.

Part 1

Part 2

Check out the unbelievable underwater footage from Dave’s new GoPro Hero3+ Black Edition!